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  1. What Makes Neuroethics Possible?Fernando Vidal - 2019 - History of the Human Sciences 32 (2):32-58.
    Since its emergence in the early 2000s, neuroethics has become a recognized, institutionalized and professionalized field. A central strategy for its successful development has been the claim that it must be an autonomous discipline, distinct in particular from bioethics. Such claim has been justified by the conviction, sustained since the 1990s by the capabilities attributed to neuroimaging technologies, that somehow ‘the mind is the brain’, that the brain sciences can illuminate the full range of human experience and behavior, and that (...)
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  • Body –to-Head Transplant; a "Caputal" Crime? Examining the Corpus of Ethical and Legal Issues.Zaev D. Suskin & James J. Giordano - 2018 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 13 (1):10.
    Neurosurgeon Sergio Canavero proposed the HEAVEN procedure – i.e. head anastomosis venture – several years ago, and has recently received approval from the relevant regulatory bodies to perform this body-head transplant in China. The BHT procedure involves attaching the donor body to the head of the recipient, and discarding the body of R and head of D. Canavero’s proposed procedure will be incredibly difficult from a medical standpoint. Aside from medical doubt, the BHT has been met with great resistance from (...)
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  • The Shield and Sword of Biosecurity: Balancing the Ethics of Public Safety and Global Preparedness.Diane DiEuliis & James Giordano - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (7):142-144.
    Volume 20, Issue 7, July 2020, Page 142-144.
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  • A Meta-Science for a Global Bioethics and Biomedicine.David S. Basser - 2017 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 12:9.
    BackgroundAs suggested by Shook and Giordano, understanding and therefore addressing the urgent international governance issues around globalizing bio-medical/technology research and applications is limited by the perception of the underlying science.MethodsA philosophical methodology is used, based on novel and classical philosophical reflection upon existent literature, clinical wisdoms and narrative theory to discover a meta-science and telos of humankind for the development of a relevant and defendable global biomedical bioethics.ResultsIn this article, through pondering an integrative systems approach, I propose a biomedical model (...)
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  • A Four-Part Working Bibliography of Neuroethics: Part 2 – Neuroscientific Studies of Morality and Ethics.Martina Darragh, Liana Buniak & James Giordano - 2015 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 10:2.
    Moral philosophy and psychology have sought to define the nature of right and wrong, and good and evil. The industrial turn of the twentieth century fostered increasingly technological approaches that conjoined philosophy to psychology, and psychology to the natural sciences. Thus, moral philosophy and psychology became ever more vested to investigations of the anatomic structures and physiologic processes involved in cognition, emotion and behavior - ultimately falling under the rubric of the neurosciences. Since 2002, neuroscientific studies of moral thought, emotions (...)
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  • A Four-Part Working Bibliography of Neuroethics: Part 3 – “Second Tradition Neuroethics” – Ethical Issues in Neuroscience.Amanda Martin, Kira Becker, Martina Darragh & James Giordano - 2016 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 11:7.
    BackgroundNeuroethics describes several interdisciplinary topics exploring the application and implications of engaging neuroscience in societal contexts. To explore this topic, we present Part 3 of a four-part bibliography of neuroethics’ literature focusing on the “ethics of neuroscience.”MethodsTo complete a systematic survey of the neuroethics literature, 19 databases and 4 individual open-access journals were employed. Searches were conducted using the indexing language of the U.S. National Library of Medicine. A Python code was used to eliminate duplications in the final bibliography.ResultsThis bibliography (...)
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  • Deliver Us From Evil? The Temptation, Realities, and Neuroethico-Legal Issues of Employing Assessment Neurotechnologies in Public Safety Initiatives.James Giordano, Anvita Kulkarni & James Farwell - 2014 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 35 (1):73-89.
    In light of the recent events of terrorism and publicized cases of mass slayings and serial killings, there have been calls from the public and policy-makers alike for neuroscience and neurotechnology (neuroS/T) to be employed to intervene in ways that define and assess, if not prevent, such wanton acts of aggression and violence. Ongoing advancements in assessment neuroS/T have enabled heretofore unparalleled capabilities to evaluate the structure and function of the brain, yet each and all are constrained by certain technical (...)
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  • Neuroethics Beyond Normal.John R. Shook & James Giordano - 2016 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25 (1):121-140.
    :An integrated and principled neuroethics offers ethical guidelines able to transcend conventional and medical reliance on normality standards. Elsewhere we have proposed four principles for wise guidance on human transformations. Principles like these are already urgently needed, as bio- and cyberenhancements are rapidly emerging. Context matters. Neither “treatments” nor “enhancements” are objectively identifiable apart from performance expectations, social contexts, and civic orders. Lessons learned from disability studies about enablement and inclusion suggest a fresh way to categorize modifications to the body (...)
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  • Ethical Contexts for the Future of Neuroethics.John R. Shook & James Giordano - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 10 (3):134-136.
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  • Neuroscience Fiction as Eidolá: Social Reflection and Neuroethical Obligations in Depictions of Neuroscience in Film.Rachel Wurzman, David Yaden & James Giordano - 2017 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 26 (2):292-312.
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  • From the Editors.Thomasine Kushner & James Giordano - 2016 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25 (4):570-572.
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  • Monkey Business? Development, Influence, and Ethics of Potentially Dual-Use Brain Science on the World Stage.Guillermo Palchik, Celeste Chen & James Giordano - 2018 - Neuroethics 11 (1):111-114.
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  • Looking Ahead: The Importance of Views, Values, and Voices in Neuroethics—Now.James Giordano - 2018 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 27 (4):728-731.
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  • Ethics Transplants? Addressing the Risks and Benefits of Guiding International Biomedicine.John R. Shook & James Giordano - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 8 (4):230-232.
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  • Head Transplants, Personal Identity and Neuroethics.Assya Pascalev, Mario Pascalev & James Giordano - 2016 - Neuroethics 9 (1):15-22.
    The possibility of a human head transplant poses unprecedented philosophical and neuroethical questions. Principal among them are the personal identity of the resultant individual, her metaphysical and social status: Who will she be and how should the “new” person be treated - morally, legally and socially - given that she incorporates characteristics of two distinct, previously unrelated individuals, and possess both old and new physical, psychological, and social experiences that would not have been available without the transplant? We contend that (...)
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