Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Temporal Dynamics of Emotional Processing in the Brain.C. E. Waugh, E. Z. Shing & B. M. Avery - 2015 - Emotion Review 7 (4):323-329.
    Emotion theorists have long held that a fundamental characteristic of an emotion is how its constituent processes change and interact over time. Assessing these temporal dynamics of emotion in the brain is critical for understanding the neural representation of emotions as well as advancing theories of emotional processing. We review the neuroimaging research on three temporal dynamic features of emotion: time of onset, duration, and resurgence and show how assessing these temporal dynamics in the brain have led to improved understanding (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • It’s About Time: A Special Section on Affect Dynamics.Peter Kuppens - 2015 - Emotion Review 7 (4):297-300.
    The study of affect dynamics aims to discover the patterns and regularities with which emotions and affective experiences and components change across time, the underlying mechanisms involved, and their potential relevance for healthy psychological functioning. The intention of this special section is to serve as a mini handbook covering the contemporary state of research into affect dynamics. Contributions address theoretical viewpoints on the origins and functions of emotional change, methodological and modeling approaches, biological and social perspectives on affect dynamics, and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Neuroscience Findings Are Consistent with Appraisal Theories of Emotion; but Does the Brain “Respect” Constructionism?Klaus R. Scherer - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):163-164.
    I reject Lindquist et al.'s implicit claim that all emotion theories other than constructionist ones subscribe to a approach. The neural mechanisms underlying relevance detection, reward, attention, conceptualization, or language use are consistent with many theories of emotion, in particular componential appraisal theories. I also question the authors' claim that the meta-analysis they report provides support for the specific assumptions of constructionist theories.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Role of the Amygdala in the Appraising Brain.David Sander, Kristen A. Lindquist, Tor D. Wager, Hedy Kober, Eliza Bliss-Moreau & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):161.
    Lindquist et al. convincingly argue that the brain implements psychological operations that are constitutive of emotion rather than modules subserving discrete emotions. However, the nature of such psychological operations is open to debate. I argue that considering appraisal theories may provide alternative interpretations of the neuroimaging data with respect to the psychological operations involved.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • The Sleeping Brain and the Neural Basis of Emotions.Roumen Kirov, Serge Brand, Vasil Kolev & Juliana Yordanova - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):155-156.
    In addition to active wake, emotions are generated and experienced in a variety of functionally different states such as those of sleep, during which external stimulation and cognitive control are lacking. The neural basis of emotions can be specified by regarding the multitude of emotion-related brain states, as well as the distinct neuro- and psychodynamic stages (generation and regulation) of emotional experience.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Timing: A Missing Key Ingredient in Typical fMRI Studies of Emotion.Christian E. Waugh & James A. Schirillo - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):170-171.
    Lindquist et al. provide a compelling summary of the brain bases of the onset of emotion. Their conclusions, however, are constrained by typical fMRI techniques that do not assess a key ingredient in emotional experience – timing. We discuss the importance of timing in theories of emotion as well as the implications of neural temporal dynamics for psychological constructionism.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Emotions, Individual Differences and Time Course: Reflections.Nico H. Frijda - 2009 - Cognition and Emotion 23 (7):1444-1461.
  • Intensity Profiles of Emotional Experience Over Time.Philippe Verduyn, Iven Van Mechelen, Francis Tuerlinckx, Kristof Meers & Hermina Van Coillie - 2009 - Cognition and Emotion 23 (7):1427-1443.