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  1. The Ethos of Excellence.Adam Berg - 2015 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 42 (2):233-249.
    The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to the normative role of conventions in sports. However, the approach I have in mind does not dispatch the theory of interpretivism. What I offer is a synthesis that aims to show how interpretivism works in concert with – and relies heavily on – conventions. To make this point, I will argue that historical, cultural, and even simple preferential needs and desires help to determine what counts as athletic ‘excellence’ in sports.
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  • Are the Current World Anti-Doping Agency Guidelines Morally Justifiable? An Overview of Ethical Considerations and Possible Alternatives.Roxanne Caron - unknown
    The World Anti-Doping Agency was created in 1999 with the goal of making elite competitive sports free of doping practices. Since then, it has grown into a powerful organization that oversees national anti-doping institutions and a majority of international sports federations. Anti-doping regulations means that the use of performance enhancement drugs or methods is prohibited in elite sports competition, and athletes who do not comply are sanctioned through a ban from competition and loss of titles and prizes link to them. (...)
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  • Coping with Doping.J. Angelo Corlett, Vincent Brown & Kiersten Kirkland - 2013 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 40 (1):41-64.
    We provide a new wrinkle to the Argument from Unfair Advantage, a rather popular one in the ethics of doping in sports discussions. But we add a new argument that we believe places the moral burden on those who favor doping in sports. We also defend our position against some important concerns that might be raised against it. In the end, we argue that for the time being, doping in sports ought to be banned until it can be demonstrated that (...)
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  • What’s Wrong With J.S. Mill’s “Harm-to-Others”-Principle?Claudio Tamburrini - 2011 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 38 (1):1-26.
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  • Beware of Greeks Bearing Gifts: A Foucauldian Response to Holowchak.Michael Burke - 2004 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 31 (2):226-244.
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  • The Paradox of Bad Faith and Elite Competitive Sport.Leon Culbertson - 2005 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 32 (1):65-86.
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  • Fairness and Performance Enhancement in Sport.Craig L. Carr - 2008 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 35 (2):193-207.
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  • On Treating Athletes with Banned Substances: The Relationship Between Mild Traumatic Brain Injury, Hypopituitarism, and Hormone Replacement Therapy.Sarah Malanowski & Nicholas Baima - 2015 - Neuroethics 8 (1):27-38.
    Until recently, the problem of traumatic brain injury in sports and the problem of performance enhancement via hormone replacement have not been seen as related issues. However, recent evidence suggests that these two problems may actually interact in complex and previously underappreciated ways. A body of recent research has shown that traumatic brain injuries, at all ranges of severity, have a negative effect upon pituitary function, which results in diminished levels of several endogenous hormones, such as growth hormone and gonadotropin. (...)
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  • Drugs in Sport: An Issue of Morality or Sentimentality?Michael D. Burke & Terence J. Roberts - 1997 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 24 (1):99-113.
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  • Drugs in Sport: Have They Practiced Too Hard? A Response to Schneider and Butcher.Michael D. Burke - 1997 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 24 (1):47-66.
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  • Sport Abjection: Steroids and the Uglification of the Athlete.David L. Fairchild - 1989 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 16 (1):74-88.
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  • A Response to Contributors.Robert L. Simon - 2016 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 43 (1):129-141.
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  • Aristotle’s Golden Mean: Its Implications for the Doping Debate.Jung Hyun Hwang & R. Scott Kretchmar - 2010 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 37 (1):102-121.
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  • Judgments of the Fairness of Using Performance Enhancing Drugs.John Sabini & John Monterosso - 2005 - Ethics and Behavior 15 (1):81 – 94.
    Undergraduates (total N = 185) were asked about performance-affecting drugs. Some drugs supposedly affected athletic performance, others memory, and others attention. Some improved performance for anyone who took them, others for the top 10% of performers, others for the bottom 10%, and finally, yet other drugs worked only on the bottom 10% who also showed physical abnormalities. Participants were asked about the fairness of allowing the drug to be used, about banning it, and about whether predictions of future performance based (...)
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  • No Harm, No Foul? Justifying Bans On Safe Performance-Enhancing Drugs.John Gleaves - 2010 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 4 (3):269-283.
    Scholars such as Simon and Loland as well as the authors of the World Anti-Doping Code argue that using performance-enhancing substances is unhealthy and unfairly coercive for other athletes. Critics of the anti-doping position such as Hoberman, Miah et al. and Tamburrini are quick to argue that such prohibitions, even though well-intended, constitute an unjustifiable form of paternalism. However, advocates for both of these positions assume that preserving good health and, conversely, avoiding health-related harms, lie at the centre of the (...)
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  • “Aretism” and Pharmacological Ergogenic Aids in Sport: Taking a Shot at the Use of Steroids.M. Andrew Holowchak - 2000 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 27 (1):35-50.
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  • Genetic Technologies and Sport: The New Ethical Issue.Andy Miah - 2001 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 28 (1):32-52.
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  • Before the Rules Are Written: Navigating Moral Ambiguity in Performance Enhancement.John Gleaves, Matthew P. Llewellyn & Tim Lehrbach - 2014 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 8 (1):85-99.
    In 1984, a number of US cyclists used blood transfusions to boost their performance at the Los Angeles Olympic Games. The cyclists broke no rules and dominated the Games, yet were later maligned as cheaters and dopers?they had, it seemed, violated some important norm, albeit one which was neither an official rule nor otherwise easily identifiable. Their case illustrates the moral ambiguity that arises when a performance enhancement is employed in a sport that has not addressed it. This article takes (...)
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