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  1. Canguilhem’s Concepts.David Marcelo Peña-Guzmán - 2018 - Transversal: International Journal for the Historiography of Science 4:27.
    In the 1950s, George Canguilhem became known in France as a vocal exponent of the philosophy of the concept, an approach to epistemology that treated science as the highest expression of human rationality and scientific concepts as the necessary preconditions for the manifestation of scientific truth. Philosophers of the concept, Canguilhem included, viewed concepts as the key to the study of science; and science, in turn, as the key to a substantive theory of reason. This article explains what concepts are (...)
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  • The Janus Head of Bachelard’s Phenomenotechnique: From Purification to Proliferation and Back.Massimiliano Simons - 2018 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 8 (3):689-707.
    The work of Gaston Bachelard is known for two crucial concepts, that of the epistemological rupture and that of phenomenotechnique. A crucial question is, however, how these two concepts relate to one another. Are they in fact essentially connected or must they be seen as two separate elements of Bachelard’s thinking? This paper aims to analyse the relation between these two Bachelardian moments and the significance of the concept of phenomenotechnique for today. This will be done by examining how the (...)
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  • What (Good) is Historical Epistemology? Editors' Introduction.Uljana Feest & Thomas Sturm - 2011 - Erkenntnis 75 (3):285-302.
    We provide an overview of three ways in which the expression “Historical epistemology” (HE) is often understood: (1) HE as a study of the history of higher-order epistemic concepts such as objectivity, observation, experimentation, or probability; (2) HE as a study of the historical trajectories of the objects of research, such as the electron, DNA, or phlogiston; (3) HE as the long-term study of scientific developments. After laying out various ways in which these agendas touch on current debates within both (...)
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  • I. Rising Up From Downunder: Comments on Feyerabend's 'Marxist Fairytales From Australia'.W. Suchting - 1978 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 21 (1-4):337 – 347.
    These notes comment on two claims in Paul Feyerabend's reply to a critique of his Against Method published in Inquiry, Vol. 20 (1977), Nos. 2?3. One of these is that this critique did not adequately deal with scepticism. The other is that it contained a radical misunderstanding of his basic argument regarding critical rationalism/ Methodism. Some mainly elucidatory remarks are offered on the first point, and the original position maintained on the second, making use of what Feyerabend says in his (...)
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  • Feyerabend's Discourse Against Method: A Marxist Critique.J. Curthoys & W. Suchting - 1977 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 20 (1-4):243 – 371.
  • Philosophy and the Sciences in the Work of Gilles Deleuze, 1953-1968.David James Allen - unknown
    This thesis seeks to understand the nature of and relation between science and philosophy articulated in the early work of the French philosopher Gilles Deleuze. It seeks to challenge the view that Deleuze’s metaphysical and metaphilosophical position is in important part an attempt to respond to twentieth century developments in the natural sciences, claiming that this is not a plausible interpretation of Deleuze’s early thought. The central problem identified with such readings is that they provide an insufficient explanation of the (...)
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  • Domains of Applicability of Social-Scientific Theories: Problems in the Empirical Falsifiability of Bounded Generalizations.Peter Knapp - 1984 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 14 (1):25–41.
  • Sociology and Common Sense.David Thomas - 1978 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 21 (1-4):1 – 32.
    After a definition of ?common sense? it is argued that sociology and common sense both do and ought to interact with one another. Four positions on the sociology?common sense relation in the light of the interaction thesis are then critically discussed: sociology must break with common sense; sociology must be based on common sense; sociology and common sense are incomparable; and sociology and common sense are identical. The first two of these positions are further sub?divided in terms of whether the (...)
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  • French Philosophy of Science, Structuralist Epistemology, and the Problem of the Subject.Tom Eyers - 2014 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 52 (2):267-285.
    This article examines the multiple relations between the rationalist tradition of French philosophy of science exemplified by the work of Gaston Bachelard, and the rethinking of the relation between science and ideology undertaken by Louis Althusser and a young Alain Badiou in the 1960s. Both Bachelard and Althusser are interrogated for the philosophy of language that underpins their respective visions of scientificity; in turn, the problem of the subject is posed, in part through an investigation of Althusser's inheritance and transformation (...)
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