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Drew Leder (1990). The Absent Body.

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  1.  44
    Framing a Phenomenological Interview: What, Why and How.Simon Høffding & Kristian Martiny - 2016 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 15 (4):539-564.
    Research in phenomenology has benefitted from using exceptional cases from pathology and expertise. But exactly how are we to generate and apply knowledge from such cases to the phenomenological domain? As researchers of cerebral palsy and musical absorption, we together answer the how question by pointing to the resource of the qualitative interview. Using the qualitative interview is a direct response to Varela’s call for better pragmatics in the methodology of phenomenology and cognitive science and Gallagher’s suggestion for phenomenology to (...)
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  2.  26
    Anticipating The Corpse or The Kingdom: Medicine and The Practice of Body/Soul Unity.Rachelle Barina - 2015 - Heythrop Journal 56 (5):778-792.
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  3.  9
    Thinking Merleau-Ponty Forward / Review of Louise Westling . The Logos of the Living World: Merleau-Ponty, Animals, and Language.W. John Coletta - 2015 - Biosemiotics 8 (1):145-151.
    A central thesis of Louise Westling’s highly accomplished and provocative The Logos of the Living World: Merleau-Ponty, Animals, and Language is that “human language and aesthetic behaviors emerge from our animality” . What is perhaps most compelling about her thesis is that she supports it by exploring how an evolutionary continuity between an always already languaged world and human being-in-the-world can be understood without having to employ the dangerous logic of social Darwinism or some schools of evolutionary psychology and without (...)
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  4.  10
    The Surprise of a Breast Reconstruction: A Longitudinal Phenomenological Study to Women’s Expectations About Reconstructive Surgery.Marjolein de Boer, René van der Hulst & Jenny Slatman - 2015 - Human Studies 38 (3):409-430.
    While having a breast reconstruction, women have certain expectations about their future breasted bodies. The aim of this paper is to describe and analyze these expectations in the process of reconstruction. By applying a qualitative, phenomenological study within a longitudinal research design, this paper acknowledges the temporarily complex, contextualized, embodied, and subjective nature of the phenomenon of expectations. The analysis identified expectations regarding three different aspects of women’s embodiment: their gazed body, their capable/practical body, and their felt body. After reconstruction, (...)
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  5.  41
    Anonymity and Personhood: Merleau-Ponty’s Account of the Subject of Perception.Sara Heinämaa - 2015 - Continental Philosophy Review 48 (2):123-142.
    Several commentators have argued that with his concept of anonymity Merleau-Ponty breaks away from classical Husserlian phenomenology that is methodologically tied to the first person perspective. Many contemporary commentators see Merleau-Ponty’s discourse on anonymity as a break away from Husserl’s framework that is seen as hopelessly subjectivistic and solipsistic. Some judge and reproach it as a disastrous misunderstanding that leads to a confusion of philosophical and empirical concerns. Both parties agree that Merleau-Ponty’s concepts of anonymity mark a divergence from classical (...)
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  6.  4
    Enhancement, Ethics and Society: Towards an Empirical Research Agenda for the Medical Humanities and Social Sciences.Martyn Pickersgill & Linda Hogle - 2015 - Medical Humanities 41 (2):136-142.
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  7.  5
    On to the ‘Rough Ground’: Introducing Doctoral Students to Philosophical Perspectives on Knowledge.Ellen Rehg & Lee SmithBattle - 2015 - Nursing Philosophy 16 (2):98-109.
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  8.  19
    Embodiment on Trial: A Phenomenological Investigation.Maxine Sheets-Johnstone - 2015 - Continental Philosophy Review 48 (1):23-39.
    This paper considers dimensions of animate life that are readily “embodied” by phenomenologists and by other philosophy and science researchers as well. The paper demonstrates how the practice of “embodying” short-circuits veritable phenomenological accounts of experience through a neglect of attention to Husserl’s basic conception of, and consistent concern with, animate organism. The paper specifies how in doing so, the practice muddies a clear distinction between the body ‘I have’ and the body ‘I am’, and a clear account of their (...)
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  9.  20
    The Phenomenology of Chronic Pain: Embodiment and Alienation.Fredrik Svenaeus - 2015 - Continental Philosophy Review 48 (2):107-122.
    This article develops a phenomenological exploration of chronic pain from a first-person perspective that can serve to enrich the medical third-person perspective. The experience of chronic pain is found to be a feeling in which we become alienated from the workings of our own bodies. The bodily-based mood of alienation is extended, however, in penetrating the whole world of the chronic pain sufferer, making her entire life unhomelike. Furthermore, the pain mood not only opens up the world as having an (...)
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  10.  92
    Flawed by Dasein? Phenomenology, Ethnomethodology, and the Personal Experience of Physiotherapy.Thomas Abrams - 2014 - Human Studies 37 (3):431-446.
    This paper applies a hybrid Heideggerian-ethnomethodological approach to physiotherapy practice. Unlike previous studies written by and for practitioners, this paper uses my personal experience receiving physical therapy as its point of departure. By combining Heidegger’s [Being and time (trans: Stambaugh J). State University of New York Press, New York 1996] notion of the ‘ontological difference’ with Garfinkel’s (Studies in ethnomethodology, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs 1967) concept of ‘accountability,’ I argue that in physical therapy practice, both client and practitioner actively shape the (...)
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  11.  6
    Is Everyone Upright? Erwin Straus’ “The Upright Posture” and Disabled Phenomenology.Thomas Abrams - 2014 - Human Affairs 24 (4).
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  12.  87
    Thinking Through the Body with Richard Shusterman.Luna Dolezal - 2014 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 22 (1):129-141.
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  13.  1
    Narrating the Brain.Edwin E. Gantt, Jeffrey R. Lacasse, Jacob Z. Hess & Nathan Vierling-Claassen - 2014 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 45 (2):168-208.
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  14.  49
    Embodied Agents, Narrative Selves.Catriona Mackenzie - 2014 - Philosophical Explorations 17 (2):154-171.
  15.  17
    Dis-Appearance and Dys-Appearance Anew: Living with Excess Skin and Intestinal Changes Following Weight Loss Surgery. [REVIEW]Karen Synne Groven, Målfrid Råheim & Gunn Engelsrud - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (3):507-523.
    The aim of this article is to explore bodily changes following weight loss surgery. Our empirical material is based on individual interviews with 22 Norwegian women. To further analyze their experiences, we build primarily on the phenomenologist Drew Leder`s distinction between bodily dis-appearance and dys-appearance. Additionally, our analysis is inspired by Simone de Beauvoir, Merleau-Ponty and Julia Kristeva. Although these scholars have not directed their attention to obesity operations, they occupy a prime framework for shedding light on different dimensions of (...)
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  16.  6
    Fictional Father?: Oliver Sacks and the Revalidation of Pathography.Andrew John Hull - 2013 - Medical Humanities 39 (2):105-114.
    This paper is a revalidation of Oliver Sacks's role in the development of medicine's narrative turn and, as such, a reinterpretation of the history of narrative in medicine. It suggests that, from the late 1960s, Sacks pioneered in his ‘Romantic Science’ a new medical mode that reunited the seemingly incommensurable art and science of medicine while also offering a way for medical humanities to shape clinical reasoning more effectively.
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  17.  12
    Wang Yangming and the Way of World Philosophy.Hwa Yol Jung - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (4):461-486.
    This essay attempts to contextualize the importance of Wang Yangming’s 王陽明 philosophy in terms of world philosophy in the manner of Goethe’s innovative plan for “world literature” (Weltliteratur). China has the long history of philosophizing rather than non-philosophy contrary to the glaring and inexcusable misunderstanding of Hegel the Eurocentric universalist or monist. In today’s globalizing world of multicultural pluralism, ethnocentric universalism has become outdated and outmoded. Transversality, which is at once intercultural, interspecific, interdisciplinary, and intersensorial, is a far more befitting (...)
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  18.  13
    Living an Unfamiliar Body: The Significance of the Long-Term Influence of Bodily Changes on the Perception of Self After Stroke. [REVIEW]Gabriele Kitzmüller, Terttu Häggström & Kenneth Asplund - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (1):19-29.
    The aim of this study is to illuminate the significance of the long-term influence of bodily changes on the perception of self after stroke by means of narrative interviews with 23 stroke survivors. A phenomenological-hermeneutic approach inspired by the philosophy of Merleau-Ponty and Ricoeur is the methodological framework. Zahavi’s understanding of the embodied self and Leder’s concept of dys-appearance along with earlier research on identity guide the comprehensive understanding of the theme. The meaning of bodily changes after stroke can be (...)
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  19.  8
    Exercise is Medicine: Some Cautionary Remarks in Principle as Well as in Practice. [REVIEW]Ross D. Neville - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (3):615-622.
    On the basis of extensive research on the relationship between physical activity, exercise and health, as well as strong support from policymakers and practitioners, the “Exercise is Medicine” initiative has become something of a linchpin in the agenda for modern healthcare reform and reflects a broader acceptance that the philosophy of health politics must shift from social engineering to performativity. However, in spite of the avowed commitment to encouraging individuals to take on a more reflexive relation to their health, it (...)
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  20.  5
    The Placebo Puzzle: Examining the Discordant Space Between Biomedical Science and Illness/Healing.Shawn Pohlman, Nancy J. Cibulka, Janice L. Palmer, Rebecca A. Lorenz & Lee SmithBattle - 2013 - Nursing Inquiry 20 (1):71-81.
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  21.  28
    Naturalistic and Phenomenological Theories of Health: Distinctions and Connections.Fredrik Svenaeus - 2013 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 72:221-238.
    In this paper I present and compare the ideas behind naturalistic theories of health on the one hand and phenomenological theories of health on the other. The basic difference between the two sets of theories is no doubt that whereas naturalistic theories claim to rest on value neutral concepts, such as normal biological function, the phenomenological suggestions for theories of health take their starting point in what is often named intentionality: meaningful stances taken by the embodied person in experiencing and (...)
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  22.  33
    A Phenomenology of Excorporation, Bodily Alienation, and Resistance: Rethinking Sexed and Racialized Embodiment.Kristin Zeiler - 2013 - Hypatia 28 (1):69-84.
    The article examines how some culturally shared and corporeally enacted beliefs and norms about sexed and racialized embodiment can form embodied agency, and this with the aid of the concepts of incorporation and excorporation. It discusses how the phenomenological concept of excorporation can help us examine painful experiences of how one's lived body breaks in the encounter with others. The article also examines how a continuous excorporation can result in bodily alienation, and what embodied resistance can mean when one has (...)
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  23.  13
    The Lived Body as a Medical Topic: An Argument for an Ethically Informed Epistemology.Anna Luise Kirkengen & Eline Thornquist - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (5):1095-1101.
  24.  10
    A Cyborg Ontology in Health Care: Traversing Into the Liminal Space Between Technology and Person-Centred Practice.Jennifer Lapum, Suzanne Fredericks, Heather Beanlands, Elizabeth McCay, Jasna Schwind & Daria Romaniuk - 2012 - Nursing Philosophy 13 (4):276-288.
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  25.  30
    Experiential Careers: The Routinization and de-Routinization of Religious Life.Iddo Tavory & Daniel Winchester - 2012 - Theory and Society 41 (4):351-373.
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  26. Varieties of Pre-Reflective Self-Awareness: Foreground and Background Bodily Feelings in Emotion Experience.Giovanna Colombetti - 2011 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 54 (3):293 - 313.
    How do we feel our body in emotion experience? In this paper I initially distinguish between foreground and background bodily feelings, and characterize them in some detail. Then I compare this distinction with the one between reflective and pre-reflective bodily self-awareness one finds in some recent philosophical phenomenological works, and conclude that both foreground and background bodily feelings can be understood as pre-reflective modes of bodily self-awareness that nevertheless differ in degree of self-presentation or self-intimation. Finally, I use the distinction (...)
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  27.  56
    Somaesthetics and the Care of the Body.Shaun Gallagher - 2011 - Metaphilosophy 42 (3):305-313.
    Abstract: This article poses a number of questions to Richard Shusterman concerning his concepts of somaesthetics and body consciousness in his book Body Consciousness: A Philosophy of Mindfulness and Somaesthetics. How do the concepts relate to the kind of forgetfulness of the body that can happen in expert performance? What is the nature of somatic reflection, and how is it different from pre-reflective awareness of the body? The article suggests that our immersed involvement and overt orientation toward things, and toward (...)
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  28.  39
    Embodied Domestics, Embodied Politics: Women, Home, and Agoraphobia.Kirsten Jacobson - 2011 - Human Studies 34 (1):1-21.
    Agoraphobia is commonly considered to be a fear of outside, open, or crowded spaces, and is treated with therapies that work on acclimating the agoraphobic to external places she would otherwise avoid. I argue, however, that existential phenomenology provides the resources for an alternative interpretation and treatment of agoraphobia that locates the problem of the disorder not in something lying beyond home, but rather in a flawed relationship with home itself. More specifically, I demonstrate that agoraphobia is the lived body (...)
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  29.  27
    Classical Liberalism and American Landscape Representation: The Imperial Self in Nature.Frank M. Coleman - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (1):75 – 96.
    Here it is shown that 'vacant nature' is deployed as sign in Anglo-American landscape representation of the seventeenth to nineteenth centuries to support a Cartesian imaginary of spatial extension. The referent of this imaginary is variously denoted as 'America' (John Locke), the 'north west' (Jefferson), the 'wilderness' (Ralph Waldo Emerson), and the 'frontier' (Frederick Jackson Turner) but throughout it is essentially the same 'vacant' landscape; its function is to produce a site and space of appearance for an imperial self, an (...)
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  30. The (In) Visible Body: Feminism, Phenomenology, and the Case of Cosmetic Surgery.Luna Dolezal - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (2):357-375.
    This paper will examine the experience of and drive for boaly invisibility in women through the theoretical approaches of phenomenology and social constructionism. An examination of the social disruptions of bodily invisibility and the compulsive avoidance of such instances, particuhrly with respect to the fastidious maintenance of body comportment and appearance within the narrow parameters afforded by social norms, will lead to an exploration of the conflation of biomedicine with the beauty industry.
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  31.  26
    Polanyi's Tacit Knowing and the Relevance of Epistemology to Clinical Medicine.Stephen G. Henry - 2010 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (2):292-297.
  32.  16
    'Inter~Place'—Phenomenology of Embodied Space and Place as Basis for a Relational Understanding of Leader- and Followship in Organisations.Wendelin Küpers - 2010 - Environment, Space, Place 2 (1):81-121.
    Based on insights of phenomenology, this article aims to contribute to a comprehensive understanding of embodied space and place of and for leader- and followership in organisations. From an interrelational perspective, the “spacing” and implacement of leadership and followership will be interpreted as local-historical and as local-cultural processes. Linked to questions of distance of leadership, embodied face-to-face interaction will be critically compared with distant, non-localised, displaced relationships and tele-presence mediated by information and communication technology. In addition to outlining some links (...)
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  33.  26
    Sartre and the Doctors.Sarah Richmond - 2010 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 18 (4):517-538.
    This paper considers how the experience of illness fits within Sartre?s account of embodiment in Being and Nothingness. Sartre makes some remarks about illness, but does not develop a full account. I show that the anti?naturalistic ontological framework in which Sartre?s discussion of the body is placed, which opposes my ?being?for?Others? to my ?being?for?myself?, imposes a revisionary account of illness, and how Sartre?s model of interpersonal relations affects his view of doctors, and their role in the illness experience. I note (...)
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  34. The Body as Gift, Resource or Commodity? Heidegger and the Ethics of Organ Transplantation.Fredrik Svenaeus - 2010 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (2):163-172.
    Three metaphors appear to guide contemporary thinking about organ transplantation. Although the gift is the sanctioned metaphor for donating organs, the underlying perspective from the side of the state, authorities and the medical establishment often seems to be that the body shall rather be understood as a resource . The acute scarcity of organs, which generates a desperate demand in relation to a group of potential suppliers who are desperate to an equal extent, leads easily to the gift’s becoming, in (...)
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  35.  84
    What is an Organ? Heidegger and the Phenomenology of Organ Transplantation.Fredrik Svenaeus - 2010 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (3):179-196.
    This paper investigates the question of what an organ is from a phenomenological perspective. Proceeding from the phenomenology of being-in-the-world developed by Heidegger in Being and Time and subsequent works, it compares the being of the organ with the being of the tool. It attempts to display similarities and differences between the embodied nature of the organs and the way tools of the world are handled. It explicates the way tools belong to the totalities of things of the world that (...)
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  36.  12
    Embodiment and Chronic Pain: Implications for Rehabilitation Practice. [REVIEW]Jennifer Bullington - 2009 - Health Care Analysis 17 (2):100-109.
    Throughout the Western world people turn towards the health care system seeking help for a variety of psychosomatic/psychosocial health problems. They become “patients” and find themselves within a system of practises that conceptualizes their bodies as “objective” bodies, treats their ill health in terms of the malfunctioning machine, and compartmentalizes their lived experiences into medically interpreted symptoms and signs of underlying biological dysfunction. The aim of this article is to present an alternative way of describing ill health and rehabilitation using (...)
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  37.  74
    Are We Our Brains?Stephen Burwood - 2009 - Philosophical Investigations 32 (2):113-133.
    My aim in this paper is to destabilise the brain-is-self thesis, something that is now regarded in some quarters as philosophical commonsense. My contention is that it is the epithelial body that enters into the formation of our sense of self and that largely bears the burden of personal identity as well as playing the key role in grounding our psychological ascriptions. Lacking any sensorimotor or social presence of its own, the brain by itself cannot "underlie" selfhood, but only as (...)
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  38.  19
    Continuity of Nursing and the Time of Sickness.Ingunn Elstad & Kirsti Torjuul - 2009 - Nursing Philosophy 10 (2):91-102.
    This paper explores the relationship between temporal continuity in nursing and temporal features of sickness. It is based on phenomenological and hermeneutical philosophy, empirical studies of sickness time, and the nursing theories of Nightingale, of Benner and of Benner and Wrubel. In the first part, temporal continuity is defined as distinct from interpersonal continuity. Tensions between temporal continuity and discontinuity are discussed in the contexts of care management, of conceptualisations of disease and of time itself. Temporal limitations to the methodological (...)
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  39.  33
    The Issue of Life: Aristotle in Nursing Perspective.Ingunn Elstad & Kirsti Torjuul - 2009 - Nursing Philosophy 10 (4):275-286.
    This paper explores the issue of life and its relevance to nursing, through Aristotle's philosophy and an Aristotelian interpretation of Nightingale's Notes on Nursing . Life as process and becoming has ontological status in Aristotle's philosophy and this dynamism is particularly relevant for nursing. The paper presents aspects of Aristotle's philosophy of life: his account of life as inherent powers of the individual, his analysis of change and time, and his understanding of sickness and health as qualitative states of living (...)
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  40. Enactive Intersubjectivity: Participatory Sense-Making and Mutual Incorporation. [REVIEW]Thomas Fuchs & Hanne de Jaegher - 2009 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (4):465-486.
    Current theories of social cognition are mainly based on a representationalist view. Moreover, they focus on a rather sophisticated and limited aspect of understanding others, i.e. on how we predict and explain others’ behaviours through representing their mental states. Research into the ‘social brain’ has also favoured a third-person paradigm of social cognition as a passive observation of others’ behaviour, attributing it to an inferential, simulative or projective process in the individual brain. In this paper, we present a concept of (...)
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  41.  95
    A Developed Nature: A Phenomenological Account of the Experience of Home.Kirsten Jacobson - 2009 - Continental Philosophy Review 42 (3):355-373.
    Though “dwelling” is more commonly associated with Heidegger’s philosophy than with that of Merleau-Ponty, “being-at-home” is in fact integral to Merleau-Ponty’s thinking. I consider the notion of home as it relates to Merleau-Ponty’s more familiar notions of the “lived body” and the “level,” and, in particular, I consider how the unique intertwining of activity and passivity that characterizes our being-at-home is essential to our nature as free beings. I argue that while being-at-home is essentially an experience of passivity—i.e., one that (...)
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  42. Perceiving Subjectivity in Bodily Movement: The Case of Dancers. [REVIEW]Dorothée Legrand & Susanne Ravn - 2009 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (3):389-408.
    This paper is about one of the puzzles of bodily self-consciousness: can an experience be both and at the same time an experience of one′s physicality and of one′s subjectivity ? We will answer this question positively by determining a form of experience where the body′s physicality is experienced in a non-reifying manner. We will consider a form of experience of oneself as bodily which is different from both “prenoetic embodiment” and “pre-reflective bodily consciousness” and rather corresponds to a form (...)
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  43.  28
    Towards an Ontological Theory of Wellness: A Discussion of Conceptual Foundations and Implications for Nursing.Sandra Mackey - 2009 - Nursing Philosophy 10 (2):103-112.
    In this article a discussion of the phenomenon of wellness and its relevance to contemporary nursing practice is developed. Drawing on phenomenology, the research literature and the author's own wellness research, an exposition of the concept of wellness is presented. It is proposed that the experience of being well is lived as a continuity of time and that it involves both a taking-for-granted of the body and containment of the horizon of concern. The state of actually being well is also (...)
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  44.  24
    Giving From Our Bodily Belongings: Is Donation an Appropriate Paradigm for the Giving of Bodies and Body Parts? [REVIEW]Fiona K. O’Neill - 2009 - HEC Forum 21 (2):151-174.
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  45. The Phenomenology of Falling Ill: An Explication, Critique and Improvement of Sartre's Theory of Embodiment and Alienation. [REVIEW]Fredrik Svenaeus - 2009 - Human Studies 32 (1):53 - 66.
    In this paper I develop a phenomenology of falling ill by presenting, interpreting and developing the basic model we find in Jean-Paul Sartre’s Being and Nothingness ( 1956 ). The three steps identified by Sartre in this process are analysed, developed further and brought to a five-step model: (1) pre-reflective experience of discomfort, (2) lived, bodily discomfort, (3) suffered illness, (4) disease pondering, and (5) disease state. To fall ill is to fall victim to a gradual process of alienation, and (...)
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  46.  1
    The Phenomenology of Falling Ill: An Explication, Critique and Improvement of Sartre’s Theory of Embodiment and Alienation.Fredrik Svenaeus - 2009 - Human Studies 32 (1):53-66.
    In this paper I develop a phenomenology of falling ill by presenting, interpreting and developing the basic model we find in Jean-Paul Sartre's Being and Nothingness. The three steps identified by Sartre in this process are analysed, developed further and brought to a five- step model: pre-reflective experience of discomfort, lived, bodily discomfort, suffered illness, disease pondering, and disease state. To fall ill is to fall victim to a gradual process of alienation, and with each step this alienating process is (...)
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  47.  42
    Anthropological and Sociological Critiques of Bioethics.Leigh Turner - 2009 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (1):83-98.
    Anthropologists and sociologists offer numerous critiques of bioethics. Social scientists criticize bioethicists for their arm-chair philosophizing and socially ungrounded pontificating, offering philosophical abstractions in response to particular instances of suffering, making all-encompassing universalistic claims that fail to acknowledge cultural differences, fostering individualism and neglecting the importance of families and communities, and insinuating themselves within the “belly” of biomedicine. Although numerous aspects of bioethics warrant critique and reform, all too frequently social scientists offer ungrounded, exaggerated criticisms of bioethics. Anthropological and sociological (...)
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  48.  5
    Ethics and Organ Transfer: A Merleau-Pontean Perspective. [REVIEW]Kristin Zeiler - 2009 - Health Care Analysis 17 (2):110-122.
    The article’s aim is to explore human hand allograft recipients’ postoperative experience of disownership and their gradual experience of their new hand as theirs, with the aid of the work of the French phenomenologist Maurice Merleau-Ponty. Many have used a Merleau-Pontinian perspective in the analysis of embodiment. Far fewer have used it in medico-ethical analysis. Drew Leder’s phenomenologically based ethics of organ donation and organ sale is an exception to this tendency. The article’s second aim is to examine Leder’s phenomenologically (...)
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  49.  10
    Self, Identities and Medicine.Kristin Zeiler - 2009 - Health Care Analysis 17 (2):95-99.
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  50.  64
    Bodily Movement - the Fundamental Dimensions.Gunnar Breivik - 2008 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 2 (3):337 – 352.
    Bodily movement has become an interesting topic in recent philosophy, both in analytic and phenomenological versions. Philosophy from Descartes to Kant defined the human being as a mental subject in a material body. This mechanistic attitude toward the body still lingers on in many studies of motor learning and control. The article shows how alternative philosophical views can give a better understanding of bodily movement. The article starts with Heidegger's contribution to overcoming the subject-object dichotomy and his new understanding of (...)
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