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  1. Representing Metarepresentations: Is There Theory of Mind-Specific Cognition?Marc Egeth - 2009 - Consciousness and Cognition 18 (1):244-254.
    What cognitive mechanisms do people use to represent other people's mental states? Do children who have difficulty processing other people's higher-level mental states such as beliefs also have difficulty processing higher-level non-mental representations such as meta-photographs? See the preprint here or find the final version in print or on the journal website.
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  • Restrictive Materialism and the Propositional Attitudes.Bennett Holman - 2011 - Philosophia 39 (1):61-70.
    It has been argued that naturalizing the mind will result in the elimination of the ontology of folk psychology (e.g. beliefs and desires). This paper draws from a wide range of empirical literature, including from developmental and cross-cultural psychology, in building an argument for a position dubbed restrictive materialism . The position holds that while the ontology of folk psychology is overextended, there is a restricted domain in which the application of the folk ontology remains secure. From the evidence of (...)
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  • Psychosis and Autism as Diametrical Disorders of the Social Brain.Bernard Crespi & Christopher Badcock - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (3):241-261.
    Autistic-spectrum conditions and psychotic-spectrum conditions (mainly schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression) represent two major suites of disorders of human cognition, affect, and behavior that involve altered development and function of the social brain. We describe evidence that a large set of phenotypic traits exhibit diametrically opposite phenotypes in autistic-spectrum versus psychotic-spectrum conditions, with a focus on schizophrenia. This suite of traits is inter-correlated, in that autism involves a general pattern of constrained overgrowth, whereas schizophrenia involves undergrowth. These disorders also (...)
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  • Autism: Beyond “Theory of Mind”.Uta Frith & Francesca Happé - 1994 - Cognition 50 (1-3):115-132.
  • Constructing a Social Subject: Autism and Human Sociality in the 1980s.Gregory Hollin - 2014 - History of the Human Sciences 27 (4):98-115.
  • Can Studies of Autism Teach Us About Consciousness of the Physical and the Mental?Simon Baron-Cohen - 1999 - Philosophical Explorations 2 (3):175-188.
    Most scientists and theorists concerned with the problem of consciousness focus on our consciousness of the physical world (our sensations, feelings, and awareness). In this paper I consider our consciousness of the mental world (our thoughts about thoughts, intentions, wishes, and emotions).The argument is made that these are two distinct forms of consciousness, the evidence for this deriving from studies of autism. Autism is a severe childhood psychiatric condition in which individuals may be conscious of the physical world but not (...)
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  • Social Phenotypes of Autism Spectrum Disorders and Williams Syndrome: Similarities and Differences.Kosuke Asada & Shoji Itakura - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology 3.
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  • Information Seeking by Rhesus Monkeys and Capuchin Monkeys.Michael J. Beran & J. David Smith - 2011 - Cognition 120 (1):90-105.
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  • Solving Belief Problems: Toward a Task Analysis.Daniel Roth & Alan M. Leslie - 1998 - Cognition 66 (1):1-31.
  • New Elements of a Theory of Mind in Wild Chimpanzees.Christophe Boesch - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):149-150.
  • Other Minds in the Brain: A Functional Imaging Study of "Theory of Mind" in Story Comprehension.P. C. Fletcher, F. Happé, U. Frith, S. C. Baker, R. J. Dolan, R. S. Frackowiak & C. D. Frith - 1995 - Cognition 57 (2):109-128.
  • An Evolutionary Theory of Schizophrenia: Cortical Connectivity, Metarepresentation, and the Social Brain.Jonathan Kenneth Burns - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):831-855.
    Schizophrenia is a worldwide, prevalent disorder with a multifactorial but highly genetic aetiology. A constant prevalence rate in the face of reduced fecundity has caused some to argue that an evolutionary advantage exists in unaffected relatives. Here, I critique this adaptationist approach, and review – and find wanting – Crow's “speciation” hypothesis. In keeping with available biological and psychological evidence, I propose an alternative theory of the origins of this disorder. Schizophrenia is a disorder of the social brain, and it (...)
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  • Characterizing the Mind of Another Species.Dorothy L. Cheney & Robert M. Seyfarth - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):172-182.
  • Mind Reading, Pretence and Imitation in Monkeys and Apes.A. Whiten - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):170-171.
  • Is Lack of Understanding of Cause-Effect Relationships a Suitable Basis for Interpreting Monkeys' Failures in Attribution?Elisabetta Visalberghi - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):169-170.
  • Cognitive Ethology Comes of Age.Michael Tomasello - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):168-169.
  • The Sounds of Silence.Charles T. Snowdon - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):167-168.
  • Knowing Thyself, Knowing the Other: They're Not the Same.Jonathan Schull & J. David Smith - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):166-167.
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  • How Do Monkeys Remember the World?R. M. Ridley - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):166-166.
  • On Attributing Mental States to Monkeys: First, Know Thyself.Daniel J. Povinelli & Sandra deBlois - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):164-166.
  • Exploring the “Boundary” Between the Minds of Monkeys and Humans.Sidney I. Perloe - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):163-164.
  • Calls as Labels: An Intriguing Theme, but One with Limitations.Donald H. Owings - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):162-163.
  • What Are Mental States?William Noble & Iain Davidson - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):162-162.
  • “How Monkeys See the World.” Why Monkeys?A. H. Harcourt - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):160-161.
  • Are Monkeys Nomothetic or Idiographic?Linda Mealey - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):161-161.
  • How Autistics See the World.Francesca Happé & Ulta Frith - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):159-160.
  • In This Best of All Possible Monkey Worlds?Harold Gouzoules - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):158-159.
  • Perception Theory and the Attribution of Mental States.Philip A. Glotzbach - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):157-158.
  • Social and Nonsocial Intelligence in Orangutans.Biruté Galdikas - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):156-157.
  • Theory of Society, Yes, Theory of Mind, No.Hans G. Furth - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):155-156.
  • Animal Mentality: Canons to the Right of Them, Canons to the Left of Them ….Aurelio J. Figueredo - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):154-155.
  • Of Monkeys, Mechanisms and the Modular Mind.Lee Alan Dugatkin & Anne Barrett Clark - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):153-154.
  • Surplusages Audience Effects and George John Romanes.Donald A. Dewsbury - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):152-152.
  • Is the Monkeys' World Scientifically Impenetrable?W. H. Dittrich - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):152-153.
  • Social Versus Ecological Intelligence.Marina Cords - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):151-151.
  • Looking Inside Monkey Minds: Milestone or Millstone.Gordon M. Burghardt - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):150-151.
  • How Monkeys Do Things with “Words”.Simon Baron-Cohen - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):148-149.
  • Monkeys and Consciousness.D. M. Armstrong - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):147-148.
  • Monkeys Mind.Colin Allen - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):147-147.
  • Précis of How Monkeys See the World.Dorothy L. Cheney & Robert M. Seyfarth - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):135-147.
  • Modality and Theory of Mind: Perspectives From Language Development and Autism.Anna Papafragou - unknown
    It is widely assumed in the developmental literature that certain classes of modal expression appear later in language acquisition than others; specifically, epistemic interpretations lag behind non-epistemic interpretations. An explanation for these findings is proposed in terms of the child’s developing theory of mind, i.e. the ability to attribute to oneself and others mental representations, and to reason inferentially about them. It is hypothesized that epistemic modality crucially implicates theory-of-mind abilities and is therefore expected to depend on prior developments in (...)
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  • Contamination in Reasoning About False Belief: An Instance of Realist Bias in Adults but Not Children.P. Mitchell, E. J. Robinson, J. E. Isaacs & R. M. Nye - 1996 - Cognition 59 (1):1-21.
  • Realism and Children's Early Grasp of Mental Representation: Belief-Based Judgements in the State Change Task.Rebecca Saltmarsh, Peter Mitchell & Elizabeth Robinson - 1995 - Cognition 57 (3):297-325.
  • Domain Specificity in Conceptual Development: Neuropsychological Evidence From Autism.Alan M. Leslie & Laila Thaiss - 1992 - Cognition 43 (3):225-251.
  • Pretending and Believing: Issues in the Theory of ToMM.Alan M. Leslie - 1994 - Cognition 50 (1-3):211-238.
  • Testing the Domain-Specificity of a Theory of Mind Deficit in Brain-Injured Patients: Evidence for Consistent Performance on Non-Verbal, “Reality-Unknown” False Belief and False Photograph Tasks.Ian A. Apperly, Dana Samson, Claudia Chiavarino, Wai-Ling Bickerton & Glyn W. Humphreys - 2007 - Cognition 103 (2):300-321.
  • When Pictures Lie: Children’s Misunderstanding of Photographs.Katherine E. Donnelly, Nathalia L. Gjersoe & Bruce Hood - 2013 - Cognition 129 (1):51-62.
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  • A Constructivist Connectionist Model of Transitions on False-Belief Tasks.Vincent G. Berthiaume, Thomas R. Shultz & Kristine H. Onishi - 2013 - Cognition 126 (3):441-458.
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  • Executive Function Plays a Role in Coordinating Different Perspectives, Particularly When One’s Own Perspective is Involved.Ella Fizke, Dana Barthel, Thomas Peters & Hannes Rakoczy - 2014 - Cognition 130 (3):315-334.
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  • Four Routes of Cognitive Evolution.Cecilia Heyes - 2003 - Psychological Review 110 (4):713-727.