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  1. Of Beavers and Tables: The Role of Animacy in the Processing of Grammatical Gender Within a Picture-Word Interference Task.Ana Rita Sá-Leite, Juan Haro, Montserrat Comesaña & Isabel Fraga - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Grammatical gender processing during language production has classically been studied using the so-called picture-word interference task. In this procedure, participants are presented with pictures they must name using target nouns while ignoring superimposed written distractor nouns. Variations in response times are expected depending on the congruency between the gender values of targets and distractors. However, there have been disparate results in terms of the mandatory character of an agreement context to observe competitive gender effects and the interpretation of the direction (...)
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  • L’accès au lexique mental dans une langue étrangère : le cas des francophones apprenant l’anglais.Heather Hilton - 2003 - Corela. Cognition, Représentation, Langage 1 (2).
    La recherche en acquisition du vocabulaire en L2 a tendance à investiguer les connaissances lexicales que les apprenants ont stockées en mémoire ; certains spécialistes considèrent que l’accès à ces connaissances constitue un facteur déterminant de la compétence communicative. Des francophones apprenant l’anglais pourraient accéder de façon efficace à la forme écrite des mots anglais, puisqu’une grande partie du vocabulaire anglais est dérivée du français. Les différences des systèmes phonologiques des deux langues rendraient le traitement de ces mêmes mots plus (...)
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  • Stop Talking! Inhibition of Speech is Affected by Word Frequency and Dysfunctional Impulsivity.Wery P. M. Van den Wildenberg & Ingrid K. Christoffels - 2010 - Frontiers in Psychology 1.
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  • Language Control in Bilingual Language Comprehension: Evidence From the Maze Task.Xin Wang - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • A Review on Grammatical Gender Agreement in Speech Production.Man Wang & Niels O. Schiller - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • A Principled Relation Between Reading and Naming in Acquired and Developmental Anomia: Surface Dyslexia Following Impairment in the Phonological Output Lexicon.Aviah Gvion & Naama Friedmann - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • Cumulative Semantic Interference for Associative Relations in Language Production.Sebastian Benjamin Rose & Rasha Abdel Rahman - 2016 - Cognition 152:20-31.
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  • Do Speakers Have Access to a Mental Syllabary?Willem J. M. Levelt & Linda Wheeldon - 1994 - Cognition 50 (1-3):239-269.
  • Effects of Syllable Frequency in Speech Production.J. Cholin, W. Levelt & N. Schiller - 2006 - Cognition 99 (2):205-235.
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  • The Epigenesis of Regional Specificity.Ralph-Axel Müller - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):650-675.
    Chomskyian claims of a genetically hard-wired and cognitively autonomous “universal grammar” are being promoted by generative linguistics as facts about language to the present day. The related doctrine of an evolutionary discontinuity in language emergence, however, is based on misconceptions about the notions of homology and preadaptation. The obvious lack of equivalence between symbolic communicative capacities in existing nonhuman primates and human language does not preclude common roots. Normal and disordered language development is strongly influenced by the genome, but there (...)
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  • Innateness, Autonomy, Universality? Neurobiological Approaches to Language.Ralph-Axel Müller - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):611-631.
    The concepts of the innateness, universality, species-specificity, and autonomy of the human language capacity have had an extreme impact on the psycholinguistic debate for over thirty years. These concepts are evaluated from several neurobiological perspectives, with an emphasis on the emergence of language and its decay due to brain lesion and progressive brain disease.Evidence of perceptuomotor homologies and preadaptations for human language in nonhuman primates suggests a gradual emergence of language during hominid evolution. Regarding ontogeny, the innate component of language (...)
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  • Language Production and Serial Order: A Functional Analysis and a Model.Gary S. Dell, Lisa K. Burger & William R. Svec - 1997 - Psychological Review 104 (1):123-147.
  • Speaking of Language: Thoughts on Associations.Susan Graham & Diane Poulin-Dubois - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):636-636.
    Müller attempts to downplay cases of dissociation between language and cognition as evidence against the modularity of language. We review cases of associations between verbal and nonverbal abilities as further evidence against the notion of language as an autonomous subsystem. We also point out a discrepancy between his proposal of homologies between nonhuman primates' communication and human language and recent proposals on the evolution of language.
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  • Is Human Language Just Another Neurobiological Specialization?Stephen F. Walker - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):649-650.
    One can disagree with Müller that it is neurobiologically questionable to suppose that human language is innate, specialized, and species-specific, yet agree that the precise brain mechanisms controlling language in any individual will be influenced by epigenesis and genetic variability, and that the interplay between inherited and acquired aspects of linguistic capacity deserves to be investigated.
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  • Genes, Specificity, and the Lexical/Functional Distinction in Language Acquisition.Karin Stromswold - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):648-649.
    Contrary to Müller's claims, and in support of modular theories, genetic factors play a substantial and significant role in language. The finding that some children with specific language impairment have nonlinguistic impairments may reflect improper diagnosis of SLI or impairments that are secondary to linguistic impairments. Thus, such findings do not argue against the modularity thesis. The lexical/functional distinction appears to be innate and specifically linguistic and could be instantiated in either symbolic or connectionist systems.
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  • A Polyglot Perspective on Dissociation.Neil Smith - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):648-648.
    Evidence is presented from a polyglot savant to suggest that double dissociations between linguistic and nonverbal abilities are more important than Müller's target article implies. It is also argued that the special nature of syntax makes its assimilation to other aspects of language or to nonhuman communication systems radically implausible.
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  • Autonomy and its Discontents.Chris Sinha - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):647-648.
    Müller's review of the neuroscientific evidence undermines nativist claims for autonomous syntax and the argument from the poverty of the stimulus. Generativists will appeal to data from language acquisition, but here too there is growing evidence against the nativist position. Epigenetic naturalism, the developmental alternative to nativism, can be extended to epigenetic socionaturalism, acknowledging the importance of sociocultural processes in language and cognitive development.
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  • Evolutionary Principles and the Emergence of Syntax.P. Thomas Schoenemann & William S.-Y. Wang - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):646-647.
    The belief that syntax is an innate, autonomous, species-specific module is highly questionable. Syntax demonstrates the mosaic nature of evolutionary change, in that it made use of numerous preexisting neurocognitive features. It is best understood as an emergent characteristic of the explosion of semantic complexity that occurred during hominid evolution.
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  • It's a Far Cry From Speech to Language.Maritza Rivera-Gaxiola & Annette Karmiloff-Smith - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):645-646.
    We agree with Müller's epigenetic view of evolution and ontogeny and applaud his multilevel perspective. With him, we stress the importance in ontogeny of progressive specialisation rather than prewired structures. However, we argue that he slips from “speech” to “language” and that, in seeking homologies, these two levels need to be kept separate in the analysis of evolution and ontogeny.
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  • Biology of Language: Principle Predictions and Evidence.Friedemann Pulvermüller, Bettina Mohr & Hubert Preissl - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):643-645.
    Müller's target article aims to summarize approaches to the question of how language elements and rules are laid down in the brain. However, it suffers from being too vague about basic assumptions and empirical predictions of neurobiological models, and the empirical evidence available to test the models is not appropriately evaluated. In a neuroscientific model of language, different cortical localizations of words can only be based on biological principles. These need to be made explicit. Evidence for and against word class (...)
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  • Neurobiology and Linguistics Are Not yet Unifiable.David Poeppel - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):642-643.
    Neurobiological models of language need a level of analysis that can account for the typical range of language phenomena. Because linguistically motivated models have been successful in explaining numerous language properties, it is premature to dismiss them as biologically irrelevant. Models attempting to unify neurobiology and linguistics need to be sensitive to both sources of evidence.
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  • Müller's Conclusions and Linguistic Research.Frederick J. Newmeyer - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):641-642.
    Because Müiller fails to distinguish between two senses of the term “autonomy,” there is a danger that his results will be misinterpreted by both linguists and neuroscientists. Although he may very well have been successful in refuting one sense of autonomy, he may actually have helped to provide an explanation for the correctness of autonomy in its other sense.
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  • Neuroanatomical Structures and Segregated Circuits.Philip Lieberman - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):641-641.
    Segregated neural circuits that effect particular domain-specific behaviors can be differentiated from neuroanatomical structures implicated in many different aspects of behavior. The basal ganglionic components of circuits regulating nonlinguistic motor behavior, speech, and syntax all function in a similar manner. Hence, it is unlikely that special properties and evolutionary mechanisms are associated with the neural bases of human language.
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  • Innateness, Autonomy, Universality, and the Neurobiology of Regular and Irregular Inflectional Morphology.David Kemmerer - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):639-641.
    Müller's goal of bringing neuroscience to bear on controversies in linguistics is laudable. However, some of his specific proposals about innateness and autonomy are misguided. Recent studies on the neurobiology of regular and irregular inflectional morphology indicate that these two linguistic processes are subserved by anatomically and physiologically distinct neural subsystems, whose functional organization is likely to be under direct genetic control rather than assembled by strictly epigenetic factors.
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  • Pluripotentiality, Epigenesis, and Language Acquisition.Bob Jacobs & Lori Larsen - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):639-639.
    Müller provides a valuable synthesis of neurobiological evidence on the epigenetic development of neural structures involved in language acquisition. The pluripotentiality of developing neural tissue crucially constrains linguistic/cognitive theorizing about supposedly innate neural mechanisms and contributes significantly to our understanding of experience–dependent processes involved in language acquisition. Without this understanding, any proposed explanation of language acquisition is suspect.
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  • A Worthy Enterprise Injured by Overinterpretation and Misrepresentation.Marc D. Hauser & Jon Sakata - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):638-638.
    The synthetic position adopted by Müller is weakened by a large number of overinterpretations and misrepresentations, together with a caricatured view of innateness and modularity.
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  • Neurobiological Approaches to Language: Falsehoods and Fallacies.Yosef Grodzinsky - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):637-637.
    The conclusion that language is not really innate or modular is based on several fallacies. I show that the target article confuses communicative skills with linguistic abilities, and that its discussion of brain/language relations is replete with factual errors. I also criticize its attempt to contrast biological and linguistic principles. Finally, I argue that no case is made for the “alternative” approach proposed here.
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  • Familial Language Impairment: The Evidence.Myrna Gopnik - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):635-636.
    Müller argues that general cognitive skills and linguistic skills are not necessarily independent. However, cross-linguistic evidence from an inherited specific language disorder affecting productive rules suggests significant degrees of modularity, innateness, and universality of language. Confident claims about the overall nature of such a complex system still await more interdisciplinary research.
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  • Autonomy of Syntactic Processing and the Role of Broca's Area.Angela D. Friederici - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):634-635.
    Both autonomy and local specificity are compatible with observed interconnectivity at the cell level when considering two different levels: cell assemblies and brain systems. Early syntactic structuring processes in particular are likely to representan autonomous module in the language/brain system.
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  • Sign Language and the Brain: Apes, Apraxia, and Aphasia.David Corina - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):633-634.
    The study of signed languages has inspired scientific' speculation regarding foundations of human language. Relationships between the acquisition of sign language in apes and man are discounted on logical grounds. Evidence from the differential hreakdown of sign language and manual pantomime places limits on the degree of overlap between language and nonlanguage motor systems. Evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging reveals neural areas of convergence and divergence underlying signed and spoken languages.
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  • How to Grow a Human.Michael C. Corballis - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):632-633.
    I enlarge on the theme that the brain mechanisms required for languageand other aspects of the human mind evolved through selective changes in the regulatory genes governing growth. Extension of the period of postnatal growth increases the role of the environment in structuring the brain, and spatiotemporal programming ofgrowth might explain hierarchical representation, hemispheric specialization, and perhaps sex differences.
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  • Double Dissociation, Modularity, and Distributed Organization.John A. Bullinaria & Nick Chater - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):632-632.
    Müller argues that double dissociations do not imply underlying modularity of the cognitive system, citing neural networks as examples of fully distributed systems that can give rise to double dissociations. We challenge this claim, noting that suchdouble dissociations typically do not “scale-up,” and that even some singledissociations can be difficult to account for in a distributed system.
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  • An Innate Language Faculty Needs Neither Modularity nor Localization.Derek Bickerton - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):631-632.
    Müller misconstrues autonomy to mean strict locality of brain function, something quite different from the functional autonomy that linguists claim. Similarly, he misperceives the interaction of learned and innate components hypothesized in current generative models. Evidence from sign languages, Creole languages, and neurological studies of rare forms of aphasia also argues against his conclusions.
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  • The Frame/Content Theory of Evolution of Speech Production.Peter F. MacNeilage - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):499-511.
    The species-specific organizational property of speech is a continual mouth open-close alternation, the two phases of which are subject to continual articulatory modulation. The cycle constitutes the syllable, and the open and closed phases are segments framescontent displays that are prominent in many nonhuman primates. The new role of Broca's area and its surround in human vocal communication may have derived from its evolutionary history as the main cortical center for the control of ingestive processes. The frame and content components (...)
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  • High Level Processing Scope in Spoken Sentence Production.Mark Smith & Linda Wheeldon - 1999 - Cognition 73 (3):205-246.
  • Lexical Access in the Production of Pronouns.Bernadette M. Schmitt, Antje S. Meyer & Willem J. M. Levelt - 1999 - Cognition 69 (3):313-335.
  • Neural Representation of the Sensorimotor Speech–Action-Repository.Cornelia Eckers, Bernd J. Kröger, Katharina Sass & Stefan Heim - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  • Goal-Referenced Selection of Verbal Action: Modeling Attentional Control in the Stroop Task.Ardi Roelofs - 2003 - Psychological Review 110 (1):88-125.
  • Lexical Access in Aphasic and Nonaphasic Speakers.Gary S. Dell, Myrna F. Schwartz, Nadine Martin, Eleanor M. Saffran & Deborah A. Gagnon - 1997 - Psychological Review 104 (4):801-838.
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  • The WEAVER Model of Word-Form Encoding in Speech Production.Ardi Roelofs - 1997 - Cognition 64 (3):249-284.
  • Syntactic Priming in Spoken Sentence Production – an Online Study.Mark Smith & Linda Wheeldon - 2001 - Cognition 78 (2):123-164.
  • Serial Order in Phonological Encoding: An Exploration of the 'Word Onset Effect' Using Laboratory-Induced Errors.C. Wilshire - 1998 - Cognition 68 (2):143-166.
  • An Intellectual Entertainment: Thought and Thinking.P. M. S. Hacker - 2017 - Philosophy 92 (1):97-128.
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  • Testing a Non-Decompositional Theory of Lemma Retrieval in Speaking: Retrieval of Verbs.Ardi Roelofs - 1993 - Cognition 47 (1):59-87.
  • The Minimal Unit of Phonological Encoding: Prosodic or Lexical Word.Linda R. Wheeldon & Aditi Lahiri - 2002 - Cognition 85 (2):B31-B41.
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