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  1. Particularizing Nonhuman Nature in Stakeholder Theory: The Recognition Approach.Teea Kortetmäki, Anna Heikkinen & Ari Jokinen - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-15.
    Stakeholder theory has grown into one of the most frequent approaches to organizational sustainability. Stakeholder research has provided considerable insight on organization–nature relations, and advanced approaches that consider the intrinsic value of nonhuman nature. However, nonhuman nature is typically approached as an ambiguous, unified entity. Taking nonhumans adequately into account requires greater detail for both grounding the status of nonhumans and particularizing nonhuman entities as a set of potential organizational stakeholders with different characteristics, vulnerabilities, and needs. We utilize the philosophical (...)
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  • The value of and in novel ecosystem.Carlos Gray Santana - 2022 - Biology and Philosophy 37 (2):1-18.
    The very idea of novel ecosystems has been controversial in ecology. Critics have complained about its imprecision, and that it illicitly smuggles problematic ethical and political values into the science. By labelling a human-modified system a ‘novel ecosystem,‘ they worry, we give policymakers a “license to trash nature.“ The critics are right to be suspicious. I show that proponents of the novel ecosystem concept have been unable to make it both value-free and precise enough to allow for applied use.Also, the (...)
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  • On the ‘Emotionality’ of Environmental Restoration: Narratives of Guilt, Restitution, Redemption and Hope.Laura Smith - 2014 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 17 (3):286-307.
    This paper presents a moral–emotional critique of environmental restoration, through discussion of narratives of redemption. The importance of ‘redemption’ vis-à-vis other environmental discourses rests with its capacity to unpack how, why and in what circumstances the idea of ‘putting something back’ for nature exerts a hold on the popular imagination. This paper thus examines the ethical and emotional experiences bound up in restoration discourses, to identify the motives deployed to confront shame and an associated guilt, and achieve restitution. In turn, (...)
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  • "Not Lawn, nor Pasture, nor Mead": Rewilding & the Cultural Landscape.Andrea R. Gammon - 2018 - Dissertation,
    This dissertation is based around conceptual conflicts introduced by the notion of rewilding and the challenges rewilding poses to place and cultural landscapes. Rewilding is a recent conservation strategy interested in the return of wilder, less human-managed environments. Often presented as an antidote to increasingly homogenized, organized, and managed environments, rewilding deliberately opens up space for the return of wild nature, typically by removing human elements that have obstructed or diminished its free reign or by reintroducing locally extinct species to (...)
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  • Exotic Invasions, Nativism, and Ecological Restoration: On the Persistence of a Contentious Debate.William O’Brien - 2006 - Ethics, Place and Environment 9 (1):63 – 77.
    Proponents of ecological restoration view the practice as a means of both repairing damage done to ecosystems by humans and creating an avenue to re-establish respectful and cooperative human-environment relationships. One debate affecting ecological restoration focuses on the place of 'exotic' species in restored ecosystems. Though popular, campaigns against exotics have been criticized for their troubling rhetorical parallels with nativism aimed at human immigrants. I point to some of the reasons why this critique of nativism persists, despite protests that no (...)
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  • Adaptive Epistemologies: Conceptualizing Adaptation to Climate Change in Environmental Science.Jerrold Long & Shana Lee Hirsch - 2021 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 46 (2):298-319.
    This article explores how scientists adapt to a changing climate. To do this, we bring examples from a case study of salmon habitat restorationists in the Columbia River Basin into conversation with concepts from previous work on change and stability in knowledge infrastructures and scientific practice. In order to adapt, ecological restorationists are increasingly relying on predictive modeling tools, as well as initiating broader changes in the interdisciplinary nature of the field of ecological restoration itself. We explore how the field (...)
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  • Symposium Introduction Eric Katz's Nature as Subject.Andrew Light - 2002 - Ethics and the Environment 7 (1):102-108.
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  • Eric Katz's Nature as Subject. Symposium.Andrew Light - 2002 - Ethics and the Environment 7 (1):102-146.
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