Switch to: References

Citations of:

Philosophy in the Classroom

Temple University Press (1977)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. The Educational Role of Philosophy.Mat Lipman - 2014 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 1 (1).
    The history of the relationship between philosophy and education has been a long and troubled one. In part, this stemmed from the problematic nature of philosophy itself, but this difficulty was compounded by controversy as to the age at which training in philosophy should begin. Although Socrates seemed indifferent to whether he conversed philosophically with young or old, his pupil, Plato, was inclined to restrict philosophy to mature students, on the grounds that it made the younger ones unduly contentious. Since (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Commentary on 'Inquiry is No Mere Conversation'.Susan T. Gardner - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 2 (1).
    There is a long standing controversy in education as to whether education ought to be teacher- or student- centered. Interestingly, this controversy parallels the parent- vs. child-centered theoretical swings with regard to good parenting. One obvious difference between the two poles is the mode of communication. “Authoritarian” teaching and parenting strategies focus on the need of those who have much to learn to “do as they are told,” i.e. the authority talks, the child listens. “Non-authoritarian” strategies are anchored in the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Ethics of Narrative Art: Philosophy in Schools, Compassion and Learning From Stories.Laura D'Olimpio & Andrew Peterson - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 5 (1):92-110.
    Following neo-Aristotelians Alasdair MacIntyre and Martha Nussbaum, we claim that humans are story-telling animals who learn from the stories of diverse others. Moral agents use rational emotions, such as compassion which is our focus here, to imaginatively reconstruct others’ thoughts, feelings and goals. In turn, this imaginative reconstruction plays a crucial role in deliberating and discerning how to act. A body of literature has developed in support of the role narrative artworks (i.e. novels and films) can play in allowing us (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Enabling Identity: The Challenge of Presenting the Silenced Voices of Repressed Groups in Philosophic Communities of Inquiry.Kizel Arie - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 3 (1):16 – 39.
    This article seeks to contribute to the challenge of presenting the silenced voices of excluded groups in society by means of a philosophic community of inquiry composed primarily of children and young adults. It proposes a theoretical model named ‘enabling identity’ that presents the stages whereby, under the guiding role played by the community of philosophic inquiry, the hegemonic meta-narrative of the mainstream society makes room for the identity of members of marginalised groups. The model is based on the recognition (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Ḥikmah Pedagogy and Students’ Thinking and Reasoning Abilities.Rosnani Hashim, Suhailah Hussien & Adesile M. Imran - 2014 - Intellectual Discourse 22 (2).
    This research drew on the authors’ long experience in the implementation of the “_Hikmah_ Pedagogy” which is based on the Philosophy for Children’s teaching method. Specifically, the study examined the influence of the pedagogy on the participants’ perceptions of and feelings about their thinking and reasoning skills. The sample comprised 188 Malaysian and international students from an international secondary school in Malaysia. This consisted of students in four Grade levels, ranging from Grades 7 to 10. An instrument named “_Hikmah_ Feedback (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Practicing Philosophy of Childhood: Teaching in the Evolutionary Mode.David Kennedy - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 2 (1).
    This article explores the necessary requirements for effective teacher facilitation of community of philosophical inquiry sessions among children, and suggests that the first and most important prerequisite is the capacity to listen to children, which in turn is based on a critical and reflective interrogation of one’s own philosophy of childhood —the set of beliefs and assumptions about children and childhood which adults tend to project onto real children. It argues that the most effective way to explore these assumptions is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Promoting Human Development by Doing Philosophy at the Heart of the Family.Helena Modzelewski - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 5 (2).
    Human development requires the education of autonomous citizens, capable of critically approaching their opportunities. However, if this is left to the school alone, the children’s most important educational environment—the family—is neglected. The Community of Inquiry, developed by Matthew Lipman into an educational methodology, aims at educating students to be critical citizens by developing habits of mind through collaborative philosophical inquiry. The research reported here was targeted at introducing the COI into the family, particularly addressing the intersubjective relationships among participants. In (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Need for Philosophy in Promoting Democracy: A Case for Philosophy in the Curriculum.Gilbert Burgh - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 5 (1):38-58.
    The studies by Trickey and Topping, which provide empirical support that philosophy produces cognitive gains and social benefits, have been used to advocate the view that philosophy deserves a place in the curriculum. Arguably, the existing curriculum, built around well-established core subjects, already provides what philosophy is said to do, and, therefore, there is no case to be made for expanding it to include philosophy. However, if we take citizenship education seriously, then the development of active and informed citizens requires (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Philosophy in the (Gender and the Law) Classroom.Laura D'Olimpio - 2017 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 38 (1):1-16.
    This article reflects on the ‘Philosophy and Gender’ project, which introduced the pedagogical technique known as the ‘Community of Inquiry’ into an undergraduate Gender and the Law course at the University of Western Australia. The Community of Inquiry is a pedagogy developed by Matthew Lipman in the discipline of Philosophy that facilitates collaborative and democratic philosophical thinking in the context of teaching philosophy in schools. Our project was to see if this pedagogy could advance two objectives in Gender and the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Development of Critical Thinking of Primary School Pupils Through Literary Texts.Šarníková Gabriela - 2017 - Science and Education: Academic Journal of Ushynsky University 25 (5):112-121.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Teaching of Critical Thinking/Thinking-Promises! Promises!John Follman - 1987 - Informal Logic 9 (2).
  • Reason and Critical Thinking.Mark Weinstein - 1988 - Informal Logic 10 (1).
  • To Describe, Transmit or Inquire : Ethics and Technology in School.Gardelli Viktor - unknown
    Ethics is of vital importance to the Swedish educational system, as in many other educational systems around the world. Yet, it is unclear how ethics should be dealt with in school, and prior research and evaluations have found serious problems regarding ethics in education. The field of moral education lacks clear and widely accepted definitions of key concepts, and these ambiguities negatively impact both research and educational practice. This thesis draws a distinction between three approaches to ethics in school – (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • To Colorize a Worldview Painted in Black and White : Philosophical Dialogues to Reduce the Influence of Extremism on Youths Online.Daniella Nilsson, Viktor Gardelli, Ylva Backman & Teodor Gardelli - unknown
    A recent report by the Swedish National Council for Crime Prevention in cooperation with the Swedish Security Service shows that the Internet has been extensively used to spread propaganda by proponents of violent political extremism, characterized by a worldview painted in black and white, an anti-democratic viewpoint, and intolerance towards persons with opposing ideas. We provide five arguments suggesting that philosophical dialogue with young persons would be beneficial to their acquisition of insights, attitudes and thinking tools for encountering such propaganda. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Why Philosophical Ethics in School: Implications for Education in Technology and in General.Viktor Gardelli, Eva Alerby & Anders J. Persson - 2014 - Ethics and Education 9 (1):16-28.
    In this article, we distinguish between three approaches to ethics in school, each giving an interpretation of the expression ‘ethics in school’: the descriptive facts about ethics approach, roughly consisting of teaching empirical facts about moral matters to students; the moral fostering approach, consisting of mediating a set of given values to students; and the philosophical ethics (PE) approach, consisting of critically discussing and evaluating moral issues with students. Thereafter, three influential arguments for why there ought to be ethics in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • What is Philosophy for Children, What is Philosophy with Children—After Matthew Lipman?Nancy Vansieleghem & David Kennedy - 2011 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (2):171-182.
    Philosophy for Children arose in the 1970s in the US as an educational programme. This programme, initiated by Matthew Lipman, was devoted to exploring the relationship between the notions ‘philosophy’ and ‘childhood’, with the implicit practical goal of establishing philosophy as a full-fledged ‘content area’ in public schools. Over 40 years, the programme has spread worldwide, and the theory and practice of doing philosophy for or with children and young people appears to be of growing interest in the field of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Community of Philosophical Inquiry as a Discursive Structure, and its Role in School Curriculum Design.Nadia Kennedy & David Kennedy - 2011 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (2):265-283.
    This article traces the development of the theory and practice of what is known as ‘community of inquiry’ as an ideal of classroom praxis. The concept has ancient and uncertain origins, but was seized upon as a form of pedagogy by the originators of the Philosophy for Children program in the 1970s. Its location at the intersection of the discourses of argumentation theory, communications theory, semiotics, systems theory, dialogue theory, learning theory and group psychodynamics makes of it a rich site (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Euthanasia and the Teaching of Argumentation in Chile.Juana Teresa Marinkovich Ravena & Ana Maria Vicuna Navarro - unknown
    This paper reports on a research project about Chilean students’ argumentation competency. Our thesis is that ethical issues are an impediment for the teaching of argumentation at high school level. To prove this, we analyze students’ discussions and we compare them with standard philosophical discussions to show the breach between them. We use the pragma-dialectical approach to contrast the different kinds of argumentation.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Dialogic Practice in Primary Schools: How Primary Head Teachers Plan to Embed Philosophy for Children Into the Whole School.Sue Lyle & Junnine Thomas-Williams - 2012 - Educational Studies 38 (1):1-12.
    The Philosophy for Children in Schools Project is an ongoing research project to explore the impact of philosophy for children on classroom practice. This paper reports on the responses of head teachers, teachers and local educational authority officers in South Wales, UK, to the initial training programme in Philosophy for Children carried out by the University School of Education. Achieving change in schools through the embedding of new practices is an important challenge for head teachers. Interviews and qualitative questionnaires were (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Listening to Dialogue.Nancy Vansieleghem - 2006 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 25 (1-2):175-190.
  • The Philosophy for Children Curriculum: Resisting ‘Teacher Proof’ Texts and the Formation of the Ideal Philosopher Child.Karin Murris - 2016 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 35 (1):63-78.
    The philosophy for children curriculum was specially written by Matthew Lipman and colleagues for the teaching of philosophy by non-philosophically educated teachers from foundation phase to further education colleges. In this article I argue that such a curriculum is neither a necessary, not a sufficient condition for the teaching of philosophical thinking. The philosophical knowledge and pedagogical tact of the teacher remains salient, in that the open-ended and unpredictable nature of philosophical enquiry demands of teachers to think in the moment (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Critical Thinking and Education for Democracy.Mark Weinstein - 1991 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 23 (2):9–29.
  • Communities of Inquiry: Politics, Power and Group Dynamics.Gilbert Burgh & Mor Yorshansky - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (5):436-452.
    The notion of a community of inquiry has been treated by many of its proponents as being an exemplar of democracy in action. We argue that the assumptions underlying this view present some practical and theoretical difficulties, particularly in relation to distribution of power among the members of a community of inquiry. We identify two presuppositions in relation to distribution of power that require attention in developing an educational model that is committed to deliberative democracy: (1) openness to inquiry and (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Identity, Citizenship and Moral Education.Laurance Splitter - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (5):484-505.
    Questions of identity such as ‘Who am I?’ are often answered by appeals to one or more affiliations with a specific nation (citizenship), culture, ethnicity, religion, etc. Taking as given the idea that identity over time—including identification and re-identification—for objects of a particular kind requires that there be criteria of identity appropriate to things of that kind, I argue that citizenship, as a ‘collectivist’ concept, does not generate such criteria for individual citizens, but that the concept person—which specifies the kind (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Benefits of Collaborative Philosophical Inquiry in Schools.Stephan Millett & Alan Tapper - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (5):546-567.
    In the past decade well-designed research studies have shown that the practice of collaborative philosophical inquiry in schools can have marked cognitive and social benefits. Student academic performance improves, and so too does the social dimension of schooling. These findings are timely, as many countries in Asia and the Pacific are now contemplating introducing Philosophy into their curricula. This paper gives a brief history of collaborative philosophical inquiry before surveying the evidence as to its effectiveness. The evidence is canvassed under (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Unexamined Lives: The Case for Philosophy in Schools.M. J. Whalley - 1987 - British Journal of Educational Studies 35 (3):260-280.
  • Intuition and the Socratic Method: Two Opposed Ways of Knowing?Anthony G. Rud - 1994 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 13 (1):65-75.
    Socratic method and intuition are two ways of knowing commonly thought as opposed. The author shows how both ways of knowing can be linked in an education that has philosophy as its armature.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Philosophy, Critical Thinking and Philosophy for Children1.Marie‐France Daniel & Emmanuelle Auriac - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (5):415-435.
    For centuries, philosophy has been considered as an intellectual activity requiring complex cognitive skills and predispositions related to complex (or critical) thinking. The Philosophy for Children (P4C) approach aims at the development of critical thinking in pupils through philosophical dialogue. Some contest the introduction of P4C in the classroom, suggesting that the discussions it fosters are not philosophical in essence. In this text, we argue that P4C is philosophy.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Overcoming Relativism and Absolutism: Dewey's Ideals of Truth and Meaning in Philosophy for Children.Jennifer Bleazby - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (5):453-466.
    Different notions of truth imply and encourage different ideals of thinking, knowledge, meaning, and learning. Thus, these concepts have fundamental importance for educational theory and practice. In this paper, I intend to draw out and clarify the notions of truth, knowledge and meaning that are implied by P4C's pedagogical ideals. There is some disagreement amongst P4C theorists and practitioners about whether the community of inquiry implies either relativism or absolutism. I will argue that both relativism and absolutism are incompatible with (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Philosophy in Schools: A Catholic School Perspective.Sean Whittle - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 49 (4):590-606.
    This article builds on the recent Special Interest issue of this journal on ‘Philosophy for Children in Transition’ and the way that the debate about philosophy in schools has now shifted to whether or not it ought to be a compulsory part of the curriculum. This article puts the spotlight on Catholic schools in order to present a different argument in favour of introducing compulsory philosophy lessons into the curriculum. It is explained that in faith schools, such as Catholic ones, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Unexamined Lives: The Case for Philosophy in Schools.M. J. Whalley - 1987 - British Journal of Educational Studies 35 (3):260 - 280.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Philosophy with Children, the Stingray and the Educative Value of Disequilibrium.Karin Saskia Murris - 2008 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (3-4):667-685.
    Philosophy with children (P4C) 1 presents significant positive challenges for educators. Its 'community of enquiry' pedagogy assumes not only an epistemological shift in the role of the educator, but also a different ontology of 'child' and balance of power between educator and learner. After a brief historical sketch and an outline of the diversity among P4C practitioners, epistemological uncertainty in teaching P4C is crystallised in a succinct overview of theoretical and practical tensions that are a direct result of the implementation (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • What is Philosophy for Children? From an Educational Experiment to Experimental Education.Nancy Vansieleghem - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (11):1-11.
    Philosophy seems to have gained solid ground in the hearts and minds of educational researchers and practitioners. We critique Philosophy for Children as an experimental programme aimed at improving children’s thinking capacity, by questioning the concept of critique itself. What does it mean when an institutional framework like the school claims to question its own framework, and what is the consequence of such a claim for thinking, in education, philosophy and the child? Implications for the concept of critical thinking follow.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Community of Inquiry: Its Past and Present Future.Michael J. Pardales & Mark Girod - 2006 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 38 (3):299–309.
    The following paper outlines the historical and philosophical development of, ‘community of inquiry’ in educational discourse. The origins of community of inquiry can be found in the philosophical work of C. S. Peirce. From Peirce the notion of community of inquiry is adopted and developed by educational theorists of different orientations. Community of inquiry denotes an approach to teaching that alters the structure of the classroom in fundamental ways. With particular consideration given to the unique philosophical origins of this approach, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Philosophical Sensitivity.Jana Mohr Lone - 2013 - Metaphilosophy 44 (1-2):171-186.
    Although much has been written about the nature of philosophy and how the discipline can be defined, little attention has been paid to the ways we develop the facility to reflect philosophically or why cultivating this ability is valuable. This article develops a conception of “philosophical sensitivity,” a perceptual capacity that facilitates our awareness of the philosophical dimension of experience. Based in part on Aristotle's notion of a moral perceptual capacity, philosophical sensitivity starts with most people's natural inclinations as children (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Making Meaning: The Voices of Children Talking About a Dramatised Story.Susan Lyle - 1996 - Educational Studies 22 (1):83-97.
    This study is drawn from nine case‐studies of Years 5 and 6 children engaged in classroom discussion following a dramatised story. It examines the organisation of the discussions and the role of the teacher in facilitating them. Presentation of classroom transcripts provides an insight into the complex process of meaning‐building which children engage in through dialogue with each other. The teaching strategy used is a Community of Inquiry, which aims to help children think both critically and creatively. In describing the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Is Respecting Children's Rationality in Their Best Interest in an Authoritarian Context?Parvaneh Ghazinejad & Claudia Ruitenberg - 2014 - Ethics and Education 9 (3):317-328.
    Based on the experiences of one of the authors teaching philosophy for children in Iran, the paper asks whether respecting children's rationality, in the form of cultivating their ability and disposition to think critically, is in their best interest in an authoritarian context such as Iran. It argues that, in authoritarian contexts, respect for children's capacity for rational thought must be balanced with responsibility for their safety in their community. In other words, children's ‘best interest’ must consider children both as (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Inoculation Against Wonder: Finding an Antidote in Camus, Pragmatism and the Community of Inquiry.Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton - 2016 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 48 (9):884-898.
    In this paper, we will explore how Albert Camus has much to offer philosophers of education. Although a number of educationalists have attempted to explicate the educational implications of Camus’ literary works, these analyses have not attempted to extrapolate pedagogical guidelines towards developing an educational framework for children’s philosophical practice in the way Matthew Lipman did from John Dewey’s philosophy of education, which informed his philosophy for children curriculum and pedagogy. We focus on the phenomenology of inquiry; that is, inquiry (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Beyond Intimaphobia: Object Lessons From Foucault and Sade.Adam Joseph Greteman - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (7):1-16.
    In this study I suggest ways of thinking through issues of intimacy that have emerged in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries in the USA. I propose a state of intimaphobia in education. However, I move beyond exposing this state of intimaphobia to offer particular readings of two philosophers of intimacy: Michel Foucault and the Marquis de Sade. I argue that these two philosophers provide alternative models of thinking through the problems and potentials of and for intimacy. While Foucault (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Dialogue and the Teaching of Reasoning.Roderic A. Girle - 1991 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 23 (1):45–55.
  • Towards an Archaeology of Critical Thinking.Felicity Haynes - 1991 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 23 (1):121–140.
  • Philosophy for Children as the Wind of Thinking.Nancy Vansieleghem - 2005 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 39 (1):19–35.
    In this paper I want to analyse the meaning of education for democracy and thinking as this is generally understood by Philosophy for Children. Although we may be inclined to applaud Philosophy for Children's emphasis on children, critical thinking, autonomy and dialogue, there is reason for scepticism too. Since we are expected as a matter of course to subscribe to the basic assumptions of Philosophy for Children, we seem to become tied, as it were, to the whole package, without reservation. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Community of Infancy: Suspending the Sovereignty of the Teacher's Voice.Igor Jasinski & Tyson E. Lewis - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (4):538-553.
    While some argue that the only way to make a place for Philosophy for Children in today's strict, standardised classroom is to measure its efficacy in promoting reasoning, we believe that this must be avoided in order to safeguard what is truly unique in P4C dialogue. When P4C acquiesces to the very same quantitative measures that define the rest of learning, then the philosophical dimension drops out and P4C becomes yet another progressive curriculum and pedagogy for enhancing argumentation skills that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Science Education and Moral Education.Michael Martin - 1986 - Journal of Moral Education 15 (2):99-108.
    Abstract Science education and moral education are mutually relevant. An education in science provides the factual information necessary to apply and revise ethical principles. In addition, science education aims to achieve certain propensities, e.g. impartiality, that are identical to some of the goals of moral education. Moral education, in turn, gives potential scientists the necessary principles and propensities to make certain decisions in the context of discovery, in the acceptance of hypotheses and in the conduct of inquiry. Science education and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Can Deweyan Pragmatist Aesthetics Provide a Robust Framework for the Philosophy for Children Programme?Sevket Benhur Oral - 2013 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (4):361-377.