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  1. How Effective is Philosophy for Children in Contributing to the Affective Engagement of Pupils in the Context of Secondary Religious Education?Asha Lancaster-Thomas - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 4 (1).
    This paper reports the findings of a predominantly qualitative study that explored the effects of the practice of Philosophy for Children on pupils’ affective engagement.[1] From its conception, the practice of P4C has been linked to the development of caring and collaborative thinking and the study aimed to closely consider that relationship. An appropriate self-designed P4C program was implemented with 75 Year 9 pupils of Religious Education at an independent secondary school in the United Kingdom. An interpretive research approach was (...)
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  • A Handy Account of Philosophy in Schools.Clinton Golding - 2014 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 1 (1).
    Philosophy in Schools is a complex educational practice, unfamiliar to most teachers and philosophers, subtly different to similar forms of education, and so easy to misunderstand and mishandle. Because of this, a common worry for practitioners is whether they are doing it properly. Given this slipperiness of Philosophy in Schools, one of my main concerns has been to give an account that would be useful; that could guide practitioners to teach well. I presented my first account in a 2006 article (...)
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  • Minima Pedagogica: Education, Thinking and Experience in Adorno.Snir Itay - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education (1):1-15.
    This article attempts to think of thinking as the essence of critical education. While contemporary education tends to stress the conveying of knowledge and skills needed to succeed in present-day information society, the present article turns to the work of Theodor W. Adorno to develop alternative thinking about education, thinking, and the political significance of education for thinking. Adorno touched upon educational questions throughout his writings, with growing interest in the last ten years of his life. Education, he argues following (...)
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  • Community of Enquiry and Ethics of Responsibility.Roberto Franzini Tibaldeo - 2009 - Philosophical Practice 4 (1):407-418.
    The article assumes that Lipman’s paradigm of ‘Philosophy for Children’ as a ‘Community of Inquiry’ is very useful in extending the range of philosophical practices and the benefits of philosophical community reflection to collective life as such. In particular, it examines the possible contribution of philosophy to the practical and ethical dynamics which, nowadays, seem to characterise many deliberative public contexts. Lipman’s idea of CI is an interesting interpretative key for such contexts. As a result, the article highlights the possibility (...)
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  • Kizel, A. (2016). “Pedagogy Out of Fear of Philosophy as a Way of Pathologizing Children”. Journal of Unschooling and Alternative Learning, Vol. 10, No. 20, Pp. 28 – 47.Kizel Arie - 2016 - Journal of Unschooling and Alternative Learning 10 (20):28 – 47.
    The article conceptualizes the term Pedagogy of Fear as the master narrative of educational systems around the world. Pedagogy of Fear stunts the active and vital educational growth of the young person, making him/her passive and dependent upon external disciplinary sources. It is motivated by fear that prevents young students—as well as teachers—from dealing with the great existential questions that relate to the essence of human beings. One of the techniques of the Pedagogy of Fear is the internalization of the (...)
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  • Cultivating Creativity and Self-Reflective Thinking Through Dialogic Teacher Education.Arie Kizel - 2012 - US-China Education Review 2 (2):237 – 249.
    A new program of teacher training in a dialogical spirit in order to prepare them towards working in the field of philosophy with children combines cultivating creativity and self-reflective thinking had been operated as a part of cooperation between the academia and the education system in Israel. This article describes the program that is a part of their practice towards co-operation between academia and schools as a part of PDS (Professional Development Schools) partnership. The program fosters creativity and self-reflective thinking (...)
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  • Philosophic Communities of Inquiry: The Search for and Finding of Meaning as the Basis for Developing a Sense of Responsibility.Arie Kizel - 2017 - Childhood and Philosophy 13 (26):87 - 103.
    The attempt to define meaning arouses numerous questions, such as whether life can be meaningful without actions devoted to a central purpose or whether the latter guarantee a meaningful life. Communities of inquiry are relevant in this context because they create relationships within and between people and the environment. The more they address relations—social, cognitive, emotional, etc.—that tie-in with the children’s world even if not in a concrete fashion, the more they enable young people to search for and find meaning. (...)
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  • Philosophy for Children Meets the Art of Living: A Holistic Approach to an Education for Life.L. D'Olimpio & C. Teschers - 2016 - Philosophical Inquiry in Education 23 (2):114-124.
    This article explores the meeting of two approaches towards philosophy and education: the philosophy for children approach advocated by Lipman and others, and Schmid’s philosophical concept of Lebenskunst. Schmid explores the concept of the beautiful or good life by asking what is necessary for each individual to be able to develop their own art of living and which aspects of life are significant when shaping a good and beautiful life. One element of Schmid’s theory is the practical application of philosophy (...)
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  • Trust, Well-Being and the Community of Philosophical Inquiry.Laura D'Olimpio - 2015 - He Kupu 4 (2):45-57.
    Trust is vital for individuals to flourish and have a sense of well-being in their community. A trusting society allows people to feel safe, communicate with each other and engage with those who are different to themselves without feeling fearful. In this paper I employ an Aristotelian framework in order to identify trust as a virtue and I defend the need to cultivate trust in children. I discuss the case study of Buranda State School in Queensland, Australia as an instance (...)
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  • Dialogic Teaching: Discussing Theoretical Contexts and Reviewing Evidence From Classroom Practice.Sue Lyle - 2008 - Language and Education 22 (3):222-240.
    Drawing on recent developments in dialogic approaches to learning and teaching, I examine the roots of dialogic meaning-making as a concept in classroom practices. Developments in the field of dialogic pedagogy are reviewed and the case for dialogic engagement as an approach to classroom interaction is considered. The implications of dialogic classroom approaches are discussed in the context of educational research and classroom practice. Dialogic practice is contrasted with monologic practices as evidenced by the resilient of the IRF as the (...)
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  • ‘Do Not Block the Way of Inquiry’: Cultivating Collective Doubt Through Sustained Deep Reflective Thinking.Gilbert Burgh, Simone Thornton & Liz Fynes-Clinton - 2018 - In Ellen Duthie, Félix García Moriyón & Rafael Robles Loro (eds.), Parecidos de familia. Propuestas actuales en Filosofía para Niños / Family Resemblances: Current trends in philosophy for children. Madrid, Spain: pp. 47-61.
    We provide a Camusian/Peircean notion of inquiry that emphasises an attitude of fallibilism and sustained epistemic dissonance as a conceptual framework for a theory of classroom practice founded on Deep Reflective Thinking (DTR), in which the cultivation of collective doubt, reflective evaluation and how these relate to the phenomenological aspects of inquiry are central to communities of inquiry. In a study by Fynes-Clinton, preliminary evidence demonstrates that if students engage in DRT, they more frequently experience cognitive dissonance and as a (...)
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  • Philosophy with Children : Moral Argumentation and the Role of Pictures.Ylva Backman, Liza Haglund, Viktor Gardelli & Anders Persson - unknown
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  • Coherentism as a Foundation for Ethical Dialog and Evaluation in School : Value Communication, Assessment and Mediation.Viktor Gardelli, Anders Persson, Liza Haglund & Ylva Backman - unknown
    In this paper, we are mainly concerned with coherentism as an approach to ethical dialog in school. We have two different but connected aims with the paper. The first aim is to say something about general philosophical questions relating to coherentism as a theory in metaethics, and especially in relation to value education; the second aim is to explore some possible implications of coherentism as a method in studying the enterprise of discussing ethical issues and questions with children as well (...)
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  • Ethics in School : A Study of the Foundation and Methods for Value Communication.Viktor Gardelli, Anders Persson, Liza Haglund & Ylva Backman - unknown
    This article is about a coming project concerning a coherentist approach to ethics in school. The project has two main parts; one theoretical and one empirical. The former focuses on philosophical problems and issues concerning coherentism as a metaethical position in general, and particularly when applied to the field of value education, and the latter aims to study some consequences of a coherentist approach to the study of discussing ethical matters with children.Metaethical coherentism is a position in the discussion about (...)
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  • To Colorize a Worldview Painted in Black and White : Philosophical Dialogues to Reduce the Influence of Extremism on Youths Online.Daniella Nilsson, Viktor Gardelli, Ylva Backman & Teodor Gardelli - unknown
    A recent report by the Swedish National Council for Crime Prevention in cooperation with the Swedish Security Service shows that the Internet has been extensively used to spread propaganda by proponents of violent political extremism, characterized by a worldview painted in black and white, an anti-democratic viewpoint, and intolerance towards persons with opposing ideas. We provide five arguments suggesting that philosophical dialogue with young persons would be beneficial to their acquisition of insights, attitudes and thinking tools for encountering such propaganda. (...)
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  • Ethics in School : From Moral Development to Children's Conceptions of Justice.Backman Ylva, Haglund Liza, Persson Anders & Viktor Gardelli - manuscript
    A main issue in Swedish school debate is the question of how to teach the student a common value system based on democracy and western humanism. The debate is rather intense, to say the least. Not only is the premise that there exists one value system that we share a target for critique, but there is also the question of what value education is or could be. There is, as well, quite a body of research on children's moral development, where (...)
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  • Playing with Philosophy: Gestures, Performance, P4C and an Art of Living.Laura D’Olimpio & Christoph Teschers - 2017 - Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-10.
    It can hardly be denied that play is an important tool for the development and socialisation of children. In this article we argue that, through dramaturgical play in combination with pedagogical tools such as the Community of Inquiry (CoI), in the tradition of Philosophy for Children (P4C), students can creatively think, reflect and be more aware of the impact their gestures (Schmid 2000b) have on others. One of the most fundamental aspects of the embodied human life is human interaction that (...)
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  • Critical Thinking Instruction.Donald Hatcher - 2015 - Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 30 (3):4-19.
    Since the 80s, educators have supported instruction in critical thinking as “an Educational Ideal.” This should not be a surprise given some of the more common conceptions, e.g., Ennis’s “reasonable reflective thinking on what to believe or do,” or Siegel’s “being appropriately moved by reasons,” as opposed to bias, emotion or wishful thinking. Who would want a doctor, lawyer, or mechanic who could not skillfully evaluate arguments, causes, and cures? So, educators endorsed the dream that, through proper CT instruction, students’ (...)
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  • On the Seam: Philosophy with Palestinian Girls in an East Jerusalem Village as a Pedagogy of Searching.Arie Kizel & Marlene Abdallah - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 4 (1):27 - 49.
    The ‘Marwa’ elementary school (pseudonym) – an Israeli public school on the border between Israel and the Palestinian Authority – is a unique educational institution in that, despite being not religious, it only accepts from Grade 1 through to Grade 6 girls. Several years ago, the principal decided to implement a Philosophy with Children (PwC) programme as an alternative pedagogy. This paper surveys how the educational faculty regarded the introduction of this curriculum and how it contributed towards the development of (...)
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  • The Social Construction of Learning and Teaching in a Classroom Community of Inquiry.M. Kovalainen - unknown
    This thesis concentrates on investigating the social construction of learning and teaching in a classroom that was encultured into working and acting as a community of inquiry across the curriculum. The theoretical and methodological premises of the study draw on sociocultural and sociolinguistic views on learning and instruction. Through this framework, the study aims at investigating the development, implementation and evaluation of the processes and conditions for communal inquiry across different pedagogical situations and across the curriculum in the case study (...)
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  • The Case for Philosophy For Children In The English Primary Curriculum.Rhiannon Love - 2016 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 36 (1):8-25.
    The introduction of the new National Curriculum in England, was initially viewed with suspicion by practitioners, uneasy about the radical departure from the previous National Curriculum, in both breadth and scope of the content. However, this paper will suggest that upon further reflection the brevity of the content could lend itself to a total re-evaluation of the approach to curriculum planning in individual schools. This paper will explore how, far from creating a burden of extra curriculum content, Philosophy for Children (...)
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  • Sharing Space with Other Animals: Early Childhood Education, Engaged Philosophical Inquiry, and Sustainability.Warren Bowen - 2016 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 37 (1):20-29.
    Collaborative research between UniverCity Child Care at Simon Fraser University and a philosopher in residence has yielded promising research in an understudied interdisciplinary undertaking: early childhood education, engaged philosophical inquiry, and sustainability. The goal of our work has been to better understand how Engaged Philosophical Inquiry can be used with young children on topics related to our local forest environment as part our centre's foundation curriculum on sustainability. Our guiding research questions include: What are children’s beliefs, ideas and concepts related (...)
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  • From Learning Outcomes to Educational Possibilities—What Happens When Philosophical Community Inquiry “Works Wonders” with University Students in Taiwan.Jessica Ching-Sze Wang - 2016 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 36 (1):26-42.
    There have been concerns in higher education circles in Taiwan regarding students’ reluctance to participate in class discussion and their lack of ability to think independently about major societal issues. A government-funded study found that the main cause is students’ fear of “losing face,” and suggests a number of practical, culturally appropriate strategies for tackling this deep-seated problem, such as making student opinions anonymous and having students present group ideas instead of individual claims.
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  • Body Talk, Body Taunt – Corporeal Dialogue Within a Community of Philosophical Inquiry.Natalie M. Fletcher - 2014 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 35 (1):10-25.
    This essay explores Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s notion of flesh as it applies within the Community of Philosophical Inquiry, the pedagogical method developed by philosopher Matthew Lipman to foster young people’s multidimensional thinking—critical, creative and caring—through collaborative dialogue. Using a phenomenological framework, the essay aims to extend Merleau-Ponty’s conception of chiasmatic relations between self and other by appealing to the account of intersubjective dialogue presented in the work of phenomenologist and CPI scholar David Kennedy. The guiding question focuses on hostility expressed corporeally (...)
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  • Philosophizing with Children in the Course of Solving Modeling Problems in a Sixth Grade Mathematics Classroom.Diana Meerwaldt, Rita Borromeo Ferri & Patricia Nevers - 2013 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 34 (1):80-92.
    While the concept of a community of inquiry based on dialogue is an integral part of philosophy for children, this concept is less prevalent in mathematics and science classes. In these subjects emphasis is usually placed on transmitting factual information as accurately and completely as possible. Children expect the teacher to tell them what the “right” answer to a question is, and teachers expect children to reproduce that answer. There is little opportunity for uncertainty, query and dialog. Discussions are often (...)
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  • Engaging in Critical Dialogue About Mathematics.Marie-France Daniel - 2013 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 34 (1):58-68.
    The goal of this paper is to highlight the fact that the Philosophy for Children Approach can be used to stimulate pupil’s reflection within the framework of school subjects such as mathematics. First we situate P4C within the field of socio-constructivist epistemology. Then, P4C as adapted to mathematics is introduced. Finally, we describe an experiment linked to five types of exchanges, manifested between the beginning and the end of a school year while the pupils were learning to philosophize about mathematics. (...)
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  • Expanding the Parameters of Exploratory Talk.Monica B. Glina - 2012 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 33 (2):16-32.
    In this paper, I define exploratory talk and explore a number of examples that were analyzed using the dataanalytic coding rules delineated by Soter et al.. Then, I propose expanding the rules for exploratory talk outlined by Soter et al. and suggest coding facilitator utterances as substantive contributions to the dialogue not intrusive interjections to the discourse. I argue that this approach recognizes the facilitator as an equal participant in the dialogue who is positioned to model good inquiry, cultivate shared (...)
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  • The Principle of a Problem-Based Approach and Its Consequences for Teaching Philosophy and ‘Ethik’.Markus Tiedemann - 2012 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 33 (1):54-64.
    The problem-based approach in teaching is a central concept of general didactics and technical didactics. It is a substantial principle and not one of those fashionable terms in didactics that are unjustifiably overrated. The discipline of didactics of philosophy can claim that it developed the problem-based approach first. Early in dialogic-pragmatic didactics of philosophy, Ekkehard Martens already understood philosophy as a “problembased process of communication.”1 In the following, I would like to discuss the problem-based approach in teaching regarding three aspects.
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  • The Dialogical Path to Wisdom Education.Maya J. Levanon - 2011 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 31 (1):64-69.
    In the following pages, I make an argument on behalf of “wisdom education,” i.e., an approach to education that emphasizes the development of better thinking skills as well as socialization and the development of students’ sense-of-self. Wisdom education can best be facilitated through dialogical interactions that encourage critical reflection and modification of one’s presuppositions. This account presupposes that wisdom is given to dialectical forces. While the paper is primarily theoretical, it touches upon my work as a teachers’ educator, which almost (...)
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  • Democracy as Morality: Using Philosophical Dialogue to Cultivate Safe Learning Communities.Monica B. Glina - 2009 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 29 (1).
    In order to begin to cultivate safe learning communities, serious social problems that manifest themselves in school settings and threaten its constituents need to be addressed. One such problem is bullying. Bullying is a type of peer aggression defined as unrelenting, willful and malicious physical or psychological abuse that results in physical or psychological harm to the victim, the bully and the bystander. Approximately 160,000 students stay home from school each day because they are afraid of being bullied, and an (...)
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  • Thinking Together with Philip Cam: Theories for Practitioners and Assessing Thinking.Clinton Golding - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 5 (2).
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  • Philosophy for Children with Learners of English as a Foreign Language.Shiauping Tian & Pei-Fen Liao - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 3 (1).
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  • The Philosophical Classroom:Balancing Educational Purposes.R. Välitalo - 2018 - Dissertation, University of Oulu
    The practice of teaching links long-standing philosophical questions about the building blocks of a good life to daily judgments in the classroom; in the journey to becoming a person who teaches, we must seek different ways of understanding what “good” means in the context of different social practices and communities. This doctoral thesis examines the educational innovation known as Philosophy for Children as a platform for teachers and students to address such questions within a community of philosophical inquiry. Advocates of (...)
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  • Confronting a Culture of Silence in an African Classroom: An Exercise in Philosophical Practice.Ibanga Ikpe - 2017 - Journal of Humanities Therapy 1 (8):1-24.
    Can Philosophy perform a useful function in contemporary society? This question is usually answered in the affirmative by philosophy teachers who point to the development of the mind as its most important tool, claiming thereby that this prepares students for entry into any profession. Over the years this answer has become less persuasive as students and academic administrators become more and more interested in courses which either train students for entry into a profession or add value to such training. The (...)
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  • Analyzing Argumentation In Rich, Natural Contexts.Anita Reznitskaya & Richard C. Anderson - 2006 - Informal Logic 26 (2):175-198.
    The paper presents the theoretical and methodological aspects of research on the development of argument- ation in elementary school children. It presents a theoretical framework detailing psychological mechanisms responsible for the acquisition and transfer of argumentative discourse and demonstrates several applications of the framework, described in sufficient detail to guide future empirical investigations of oral, written, individual, or group argumentation performance. Software programs capable of facilitating data analysis are identified and their uses illustrated. The analytic schemes can be used to (...)
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  • Is Argument for Conservatives? Or Where Do Sparkling New Ideas Come From?Sharon Bailin - 2003 - Informal Logic 23 (1).
    Rorty claims argument is inherently conservative and philosophical progress comes from "sparkling new ideas," not argument. This assumes an untenable opposition between the generation and the evaluation of ideas, with argument relegated to evaluation. New ideas that contribute to progress arise from critical reflection on problems posed by the tradition, and constrained by the criteria governing evaluation. Thinking directed toward the criticism and evaluation of ideas or products is not algorithmic; it has a generative, creative component. An overall assessment in (...)
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  • The Community of Philosophical Inquiry as a Regulative Ideal.Magda Costa Carvalho & Dina Mendonça - 2017 - In Felix Moryion, Elen Duthie & R. Robles (eds.), Parecidos de familia. Propuestas actuales en Filosofía para Niños / Family ressemblances. Current proposals in Philosophy for Children. Madrid: Anaya. pp. 36-46.
    The paper proposes that taking the notion of “community of inquiry” as a regulative ideal is a valuable working tool for the refinement and improvement of the practice of Philosophy for Children (P4C). Reed (1996) and Sprod (1997) have already drawn attention to this, stating that the community of inquiry is more a regulative idea than a typical occurrence. Building on these claims, we will show that taking the notion of community of inquiry as such gives new light to many (...)
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  • Childhood, Philosophy and Play: Friedrich Schiller and the Interface Between Reason, Passion and Sensation.Barbara Weber - 2011 - Philosophy of Education 45 (2):235-250.
    Philosophy for Children claims to foster not only critical thinking, but also creative and caring thinking. However, its theoretical foundations draw mainly on the analytic and pragmatist philosophical tradition. Consequently, and made evident by the choice of the terms ‘caring thinking’ and ‘creative thinking’, it seem to reduce these concepts mostly to ‘thinking skills’. In this article I will first briefly explicate the difficulties of such a reduction. Secondly I will try to resolve this problem by embedding rationality, creativity and (...)
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  • Philosophy for Children as the Wind of Thinking.Nancy Vansieleghem - 2005 - Philosophy of Education 39 (1):19-35.
    In this paper I want to analyse the meaning of education for democracy and thinking as this is generally understood by Philosophy for Children. Although we may be inclined to applaud Philosophy for Children's emphasis on children, critical thinking, autonomy and dialogue, there is reason for scepticism too. Since we are expected as a matter of course to subscribe to the basic assumptions of Philosophy for Children, we seem to become tied, as it were, to the whole package, without reservation. (...)
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  • Multidimensional Thinking in a Digimodernist World.Chi-Ming Lam - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (14):1525-1526.
  • The Teacher as Guide: A Conception of the Inquiry Teacher.Clinton Golding - 2013 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (1):91-110.
    This article explains how teachers might navigate inquiry learning despite the experience of a constant tension between abandoning their students and controlling them. They do this by conceiving of themselves as guides who decide the path with students, not for them. I build on a conception of teaching as guiding from Burbules, and argue that inquiry teachers should take the particular stance of an expedition-educator (rather than the stance of either a tour-leader or an expedition-leader). They should guide students to (...)
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  • Discussing Controversial Issues in the Classroom.Michael Hand & Ralph Levinson - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (6):614-629.
    Discussion is widely held to be the pedagogical approach most appropriate to the exploration of controversial issues in the classroom, but surprisingly little attention has been given to the questions of why it is the preferred approach and how best to facilitate it. Here we address ourselves to both questions. We begin by clarifying the concept of discussion and justifying it as an approach to the teaching of controversial issues. We then report on a recent empirical study of the Perspectives (...)
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  • Philosophy, Critical Thinking and Philosophy for Children1.Marie‐France Daniel & Emmanuelle Auriac - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (5):415-435.
    For centuries, philosophy has been considered as an intellectual activity requiring complex cognitive skills and predispositions related to complex (or critical) thinking. The Philosophy for Children (P4C) approach aims at the development of critical thinking in pupils through philosophical dialogue. Some contest the introduction of P4C in the classroom, suggesting that the discussions it fosters are not philosophical in essence. In this text, we argue that P4C is philosophy.
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  • The Many Faces of Constructivist Discussion.Clinton Golding - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (5):467-483.
    Although constructivist discussions in the classroom are often treated as if they were all of the same kind, in this paper I argue that there are subtle but important distinctions that need to be made. An analysis of these distinctions shows that there is a continuum of different constructivist discussions. At one extreme are teacher-directed discussions where students are led to construct the ‘correct’ understanding of a pre-decided conclusion; at the other extreme are unstructured discussions where students are free to (...)
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  • Overcoming Relativism and Absolutism: Dewey's Ideals of Truth and Meaning in Philosophy for Children.Jennifer Bleazby - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (5):453-466.
    Different notions of truth imply and encourage different ideals of thinking, knowledge, meaning, and learning. Thus, these concepts have fundamental importance for educational theory and practice. In this paper, I intend to draw out and clarify the notions of truth, knowledge and meaning that are implied by P4C's pedagogical ideals. There is some disagreement amongst P4C theorists and practitioners about whether the community of inquiry implies either relativism or absolutism. I will argue that both relativism and absolutism are incompatible with (...)
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  • Making Sense in Education: Deleuze on Thinking Against Common Sense.Itay Snir - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (3):299-311.
    According to a widespread view, one of the most important roles of education is the nurturing of common sense. In this article I turn to Gilles Deleuze’s concept of sense to develop a contrary view of education—one that views education as a radical challenge to common sense. The discussion will centre on the relation of sense and common sense to thinking. Although adherents of common sense refer to it as the basis of all thought and appeal to critical thinking as (...)
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  • Trust and Schooling.Bruce Haynes - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (2):119-122.
  • Trust and the Community of Inquiry.Haynes Felicity - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (2):144-151.
    This article investigates the place of trust in learning relations in the classroom, not only between teacher and student, but also between student and student. To do this, it will first examine a pedagogy called community of inquiry, espoused by John Dewey and used in most Philosophy for Children courses in Australia. It will then consider what different forms of trust are involved in other power relations in the classroom, particularly the rational structuralism of R.S Peters, or the experiential philosophy (...)
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  • Opening Teachers' Minds to Philosophy: The Crucial Role of Teacher Education.Sue Knight & Carol Collins - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (11):1-10.
    Why has the ‘Philosophy for Children’ movement failed to make significant educational inroads in Australia, given the commitment and ongoing efforts of philosophers and educators alike who have worked hard in recent decades to bring philosophy to our schools? In this article we single out one factor as having particular importance, namely, that, on the whole, teachers consider philosophical inquiry to be futile. We argue that the explanation rests with teachers’ underlying epistemological beliefs and that openness to philosophy depends upon (...)
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  • What is Philosophy for Children? From an Educational Experiment to Experimental Education.Nancy Vansieleghem - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (11):1-11.
    Philosophy seems to have gained solid ground in the hearts and minds of educational researchers and practitioners. We critique Philosophy for Children as an experimental programme aimed at improving children’s thinking capacity, by questioning the concept of critique itself. What does it mean when an institutional framework like the school claims to question its own framework, and what is the consequence of such a claim for thinking, in education, philosophy and the child? Implications for the concept of critical thinking follow.
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