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  1. The Future of Value Sensitive Design.Batya Friedman, David Hendry, Steven Umbrello, Jeroen Van Den Hoven & Daisy Yoo - 2020 - Paradigm Shifts in ICT Ethics: Proceedings of the 18th International Conference ETHICOMP 2020.
    In this panel, we explore the future of value sensitive design (VSD). The stakes are high. Many in public and private sectors and in civil society are gradually realizing that taking our values seriously implies that we have to ensure that values effectively inform the design of technology which, in turn, shapes people’s lives. Value sensitive design offers a highly developed set of theory, tools, and methods to systematically do so.
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  • Creative Anticipatory Ethical Reasoning with Scenario Analysis and Design Fiction.Emily York & Shannon N. Conley - forthcoming - Science and Engineering Ethics:1-32.
    This paper presents an experimental approach for engaging undergraduate STEM students in anticipatory ethical reasoning, or ethical reasoning applied to the analysis of potential mid- to long-term implications and outcomes of technological innovation. The authors implemented two variations of an approach that integrates three key components—scenario analysis, design fiction, and ethical frameworks—into five sections of an introductory course on the social contexts of science and technology that is required of STEM majors. The authors dub this approach Creative Anticipatory Ethical Reasoning, (...)
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  • Gaming, Texting, Learning? Teaching Engineering Ethics Through Students' Lived Experiences With Technology.Georgina Voss - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):1375-1393.
    This paper examines how young peoples’ lived experiences with personal technologies can be used to teach engineering ethics in a way which facilitates greater engagement with the subject. Engineering ethics can be challenging to teach: as a form of practical ethics, it is framed around future workplace experience in a professional setting which students are assumed to have no prior experience of. Yet the current generations of engineering students, who have been described as ‘digital natives’, do however have immersive personal (...)
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  • Virtues in Participatory Design: Cooperation, Curiosity, Creativity, Empowerment and Reflexivity. [REVIEW]Marc Steen - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):945-962.
    In this essay several virtues are discussed that are needed in people who work in participatory design (PD). The term PD is used here to refer specifically to an approach in designing information systems with its roots in Scandinavia in the 1970s and 1980s. Through the lens of virtue ethics and based on key texts in PD, the virtues of cooperation, curiosity, creativity, empowerment and reflexivity are discussed. Cooperation helps people in PD projects to engage in cooperative curiosity and cooperative (...)
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  • Teaching Engineering Ethics Using BLOCKS Game.Shiew Wei Lau, Terence Peng Lian Tan & Suk Meng Goh - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):1357-1373.
    The aim of this study was to investigate the use of a newly developed design game called BLOCKS to stimulate awareness of ethical responsibilities amongst engineering students. The design game was played by seventeen teams of chemical engineering students, with each team having to arrange pieces of colored paper to produce two letters each. Before the end of the game, additional constraints were introduced to the teams such that they faced similar ambiguity in the technical facts that the engineers involved (...)
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  • Using and Developing Role Plays in Teaching Aimed at Preparing for Social Responsibility.Neelke Doorn & J. Otto Kroesen - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (4):1513-1527.
    In this paper, we discuss the use of role plays in ethics education for engineering students. After presenting a rough taxonomy of different objectives, we illustrate how role plays can be used to broaden students’ perspectives. We do this on the basis of our experiences with a newly developed role play about a Dutch political controversy concerning pig transport. The role play is special in that the discussion is about setting up an institutional framework for responsible action that goes beyond (...)
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  • Teaching Engineering Ethics by Conceptual Design: The Somatic Marker Hypothesis.Brad J. Kallenberg - 2009 - Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (4):563-576.
    In 1998, a lead researcher at a Midwestern university submitted as his own a document that had 64 instances of strings of 10 or more words that were identical to a consultant’s masters thesis and replicated a data chart, all of whose 16 entries were identical to three and four significant figures. He was fired because his actions were wrong. Curiously, he was completely unable to see that his actions were wrong. This phenomenon is discussed in light of recent advances (...)
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  • It's All in the Game: A 3D Learning Model for Business Ethics.Suzy Jagger, Haytham Siala & Diane Sloan - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 137 (2):383-403.
    How can we improve business ethics education for the twenty first century? This study evaluates the effectiveness of a visual case exercise in the form of a 3D immersive game given to undergraduate students at two UK Universities as part of a mandatory business ethics module. We propose that due to evolving learning styles, the immersive nature of interactive games lends itself as a vehicle to make the learning of ethics more ‘concrete’ and ‘personal’ and therefore more engaging. To achieve (...)
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  • Teaching Ethics to Engineers: A Socratic Experience.Gonzalo Génova & M. Rosario González - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (2):567-580.
    In this paper we present the authors’ experience of teaching a course in Ethics for Engineers, which has been delivered four times in three different universities in Spain and Chile. We begin by presenting the material context of the course, and especially the intellectual background of the participating students, in terms of their previous understanding of philosophy in general, and of ethics in particular. Next we set out the objectives of the course and the main topics addressed, as well as (...)
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  • Beyond Ethical Frameworks: Using Moral Experimentation in the Engineering Ethics Classroom.Olivia Walling - 2015 - Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (6):1637-1656.
    Although undergraduate engineering ethics courses often include the development of moral sensitivity as a learning objective and the use of active learning techniques, teaching centers on the transmission of cognitive knowledge. This article describes a complementary assignment asking students to perform an ethics “experiment” on themselves that has a potential to enhance affective learning and moral imagination. The article argues that the focus on cognitive learning may not promote, and may even impair, our efforts to foster moral sensitivity. In contrast, (...)
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