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  1. Interdisciplinary Workshop Report: Methodology and 'Personhood and Identity in Medicine'.Elselijn Kingma & Mary Margaret McCabe - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (5):1057-1063.
  • Not a Philosophy of Clinical Medicine: A Commentary on 'The Philosophy of Evidence‐Based Medicine' Howick, J. Ed. (2001).Mark R. Tonelli - 2011 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):1013-1017.
  • Interdisciplinary Workshop on Concepts of Health and Disease: Report.Elselijn Kingma, Ben Chisnall & M. M. McCabe - 2011 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):1018-1022.
  • Criticizing the Data: Some Concerns About Empirical Approaches to Ethics.Michael Loughlin - 2011 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):970-975.
  • Reason and Value: Making Reasoning Fit for Practice.Michael Loughlin, Robyn Bluhm, Stephen Buetow, Ross E. G. Upshur, Maya J. Goldenberg, Kirstin Borgerson, Vikki Entwistle & Elselijn Kingma - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (5):929-937.
    Editors' introduction to 3rd thematic issue on philosophy of medicine.
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  • Explanation, Understanding, Objectivity and Experience.Michael Loughlin, Robyn Bluhm, Drozdstoj S. Stoyanov, Stephen Buetow, Ross E. G. Upshur, Kirstin Borgerson, Maya J. Goldenberg & Elselijn Kingma - 2013 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (3):415-421.
  • Medical Humanities' Challenge to Medicine.Jane Macnaughton - 2011 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):927-932.
  • Virtue, Progress and Practice.Michael Loughlin, Robyn Bluhm, Stephen Buetow, Ross E. G. Upshur, Maya J. Goldenberg, Kirstin Borgerson & Vikki Entwistle - 2011 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):839-846.
  • Science, Practice and Mythology: A Definition and Examination of the Implications of Scientism in Medicine. [REVIEW]Michael Loughlin, George Lewith & Torkel Falkenberg - 2013 - Health Care Analysis 21 (2):130-145.
    Scientism is a philosophy which purports to define what the world ‘really is’. It adopts what the philosopher Thomas Nagel called ‘an epistemological criterion of reality’, defining what is real as that which can be discovered by certain quite specific methods of investigation. As a consequence all features of experience not revealed by those methods are deemed ‘subjective’ in a way that suggests they are either not real, or lie beyond the scope of meaningful rational inquiry. This devalues capacities that (...)
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  • Theory, Experience and Practice.Michael Loughlin, Jonathan Fuller, Robyn Bluhm, Stephen Buetow & Kirstin Borgerson - 2016 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 22 (4):459-465.
    Despite its potential hazards, the activity of questioning theoretical frameworks and and proposing solutions is necessary if progress is even to be possible. Intellectual history has by no means ended so we cannot expect to have all the answers, and from time to time the activity of critical questioning will be frustrating. But intellectual progress requires us to continue the process of asking fundamental questions. The alternative to thinking in this way is indeed unthinkable.
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  • Philosophy, Medicine and Health Care – Where We Have Come From and Where We Are Going.Michael Loughlin, Robyn Bluhm, Jonathan Fuller, Stephen Buetow, Ross E. G. Upshur, Kirstin Borgerson, Maya J. Goldenberg & Elselijn Kingma - 2014 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 20 (6):902-907.
  • Diseases, Patients and the Epistemology of Practice: Mapping the Borders of Health, Medicine and Care.Michael Loughlin, Robyn Bluhm, Jonathan Fuller, Stephen Buetow, Benjamin R. Lewis & Brent M. Kious - 2015 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 21 (3):357-364.
    Last year saw the 20th anniversary edition of JECP, and in the introduction to the philosophy section of that landmark edition, we posed the question: apart from ethics, what is the role of philosophy ‘at the bedside’? The purpose of this question was not to downplay the significance of ethics to clinical practice. Rather, we raised it as part of a broader argument to the effect that ethical questions – about what we should do in any given situation – are (...)
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  • Teaching by (Bad) Example: What a Confused Attempt to “Advance” EBM Reveals About its Underlying Problems: Commentary on Jenicek, M. (2015) Do We Need Another Discipline in Medicine? From Epidemiology and Evidence Based Medicine to Cognitive Medicine and Medical Thinking.Michael Loughlin, Peter Wyer & Sandra Tanenbaum - 2016 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 22 (4):628-633.
    Professor Jenicek's paper is confused, in that his proposal to “integrate” what he means by “evidence-based scientific theory and cognitive approaches to medical thinking” actually embodies a contradiction. But, although confused, he succeeds in teaching us more about the EBM debate than those who seem keen to forge ahead without addressing the underlying epistemological problems that Jenicek brings to our attention. Fundamental questions about the relationship between evidence, knowledge and reason still require resolution if we are to see a genuine (...)
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  • Reasoning, Evidence, and Clinical Decision-Making: The Great Debate Moves Forward.Michael Loughlin, Robyn Bluhm, Stephen Buetow, Kirstin Borgerson & Jonathan Fuller - 2017 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 23 (5):905-914.
    When the editorial to the first philosophy thematic edition of this journal was published in 2010, critical questioning of underlying assumptions, regarding such crucial issues as clinical decision making, practical reasoning, and the nature of evidence in health care, was still derided by some prominent contributors to the literature on medical practice. Things have changed dramatically. Far from being derided or dismissed as a distraction from practical concerns, the discussion of such fundamental questions, and their implications for matters of practical (...)
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  • Mapping the Territory of Person-Centred Care: Ordinary Language and Philosophical Methodology.Michael Loughlin - unknown
    Fulford’s chapter discusses the conceptual challenges facing person-centred care and the role of philosophy in addressing these challenges. He is right that this role - to investigate underlying meanings and reveal assumptions - need not and should not be restricted to the search for definitions of key terminology. The methods of “ordinary language philosophy” enable us to understand the meanings of terms by systematically examining their use in context, with a view to mapping a term's “logical geography”. He makes effective (...)
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