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  1. Fashioning the Immunological Self: The Biological Individuality of F. Macfarlane Burnet. [REVIEW]Warwick Anderson & Ian R. Mackay - 2014 - Journal of the History of Biology 47 (1):147-175.
    During the 1940s and 1950s, the Australian microbiologist F. Macfarlane Burnet sought a biologically plausible explanation of antibody production. In this essay, we seek to recover the conceptual pathways that Burnet followed in his immunological theorizing. In so doing, we emphasize the influence of speculations on individuality, especially those of philosopher Alfred North Whitehead; the impact of cybernetics and information theory; and the contributions of clinical research into autoimmune disease that took place in Melbourne. We point to the influence of (...)
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  • Imagining ‘Reactivity’: Allergy Within the History of Immunology.Michelle Jamieson - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 41 (4):356-366.
  • Biotherapies of Chronic Diseases in the Inter-War Period: From Witte's Peptone to Penicillium Extract.Ilana Löwy - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 36 (4):675-695.
    In the inter-war period physicians elaborated numerous ‘biotherapies’ grounded in the complex interactions between physiology, bacteriology and immunology. The elaboration of these non-specific biological treatments was stimulated by the theory of generalized anaphylaxis that linked the violent reaction to a foreign protein to a broad array of chronic diseases, from asthma and urticaria to rheumatism or chronic colitis. Such diseases were perceived as the result of an ‘abnormal reactivity’ to a sensitisation of tissues and organs by bacteria and by foreign (...)
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  • Imagining 'Reactivity': Allergy Within the History of Immunology.Michelle Jamieson - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 41 (4):356-366.
    An allergy is commonly understood to be an overreaction of the immune system to harmless substances that are misrecognised as foreign. This concept of allergy as an abnormal, misdirected immune response—a biological fault—stems from the idea that the immune system is an inherently defensive operation designed to protect the individual through an innate capacity to discriminate between the benign and toxic, or self and nonself. However, this definition of allergy represents a radical departure from its original formulation. Literally meaning ‘altered (...)
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