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  1. To Change or Not to Change - Translating and Culturally Adapting the Paediatric Version of the Moral Distress Scale-Revised.Margareta af Sandeberg, Marika Wenemark, Cecilia Bartholdson, Kim Lützén & Pernilla Pergert - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):14.
    Paediatric cancer care poses ethically difficult situations that can lead to value conflicts about what is best for the child, possibly resulting in moral distress. Research on moral distress is lacking in paediatric cancer care in Sweden and most questionnaires are developed in English. The Moral Distress Scale-Revised is a questionnaire that measures moral distress in specific situations; respondents are asked to indicate both the frequency and the level of disturbance when the situation arises. The aims of this study were (...)
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  • Phronesis of Nurses: A Response to Moral Distress.Hsun-Kuei Ko, Hui-Chen Tseng, Chi-Chun Chin & Min-Tao Hsu - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics:096973301983312.
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  • Conceptualising Moral Resilience for Nursing Practice.Tiziana M. L. Sala Defilippis, Katherine Curtis & Ann Gallagher - forthcoming - Nursing Inquiry:e12291.
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  • Moral Distress Reexamined: A Feminist Interpretation of Nurses' Identities, Relationships, and Responsibilites. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Peter & Joan Liaschenko - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (3):337-345.
    Moral distress has been written about extensively in nursing and other fields. Often, however, it has not been used with much theoretical depth. This paper focuses on theorizing moral distress using feminist ethics, particularly the work of Margaret Urban Walker and Hilde Lindemann. Incorporating empirical findings, we argue that moral distress is the response to constraints experienced by nurses to their moral identities, responsibilities, and relationships. We recommend that health professionals get assistance in accounting for and communicating their values and (...)
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  • Organizational Influences on Health Professionals’ Experiences of Moral Distress in PICUs.Sarah Wall, Wendy J. Austin & Daniel Garros - 2016 - HEC Forum 28 (1):53-67.
    This article reports the findings of a qualitative study that explored the organizational influences on moral distress for health professionals working in pediatric intensive care units across Canada. Participants were recruited to the study from PICUs across Canada. The PICU is a high-tech, fast-paced, high-pressure environment where caregivers frequently face conflict and ethical tension in the care of critically ill children. A number of themes including relationships with management, organizational structure and processes, workload and resources, and team dynamics were identified. (...)
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  • Can the Ethical Best Practice of Shared Decision-Making Lead to Moral Distress?Trisha M. Prentice & Lynn Gillam - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (2):259-268.
    When healthcare professionals feel constrained from acting in a patient’s best interests, moral distress ensues. The resulting negative sequelae of burnout, poor retention rates, and ultimately poor patient care are well recognized across healthcare providers. Yet an appreciation of how particular disciplines, including physicians, come to be “constrained” in their actions is still lacking. This paper will examine how the application of shared decision-making may contribute to the experience of moral distress for physicians and why such distress may go under-recognized. (...)
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  • Identification of Risk Factors for Moral Distress in Nurses: Basis for the Development of a New Assessment Tool.Rafaela Schaefer, Elma Lourdes Campos Pavone Zoboli & Margarida Vieira - 2016 - Nursing Inquiry 23 (4):346-357.
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  • Moral Distress and its Interconnection with Moral Sensitivity and Moral Resilience: Viewed From the Philosophy of Viktor E. Frankl. [REVIEW]Kim Lützén & Béatrice Ewalds-Kvist - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (3):317-324.
    The interconnection between moral distress, moral sensitivity, and moral resilience was explored by constructing two hypothetical scenarios based on a recent Swedish newspaper report. In the first scenario, a 77-year-old man, rational and awake, was coded as “do not resuscitate” (DNR) against his daughter’s wishes. The patient died in the presence of nurses who were not permitted to resuscitate him. The second scenario concerned a 41-year-old man, who had been in a coma for three weeks. He was also coded as (...)
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  • Nurses' Dilemmas Concerning Support of Relatives in Mental Health Care.B. M. Weimand, C. Sallstrom, M. -L. Hall-Lord & B. Hedelin - 2013 - Nursing Ethics 20 (3):285-299.
    Relatives of persons with severe mental illness face a straining life situation and need support. Exclusion of relatives in mental health care has long been reported. The aim of this study was to describe conceptions of nurses in mental health care about supporting relatives of persons with severe mental illness. Focus group interviews with nurses from all levels of mental health care in Norway were performed. A phenomenographic approach was used. The nurses found that their responsibility first and foremost was (...)
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  • Clear Conscience Grounded in Relations: Expressions of Persian-Speaking Nurses in Sweden.Monir Mazaheri, Eva Ericson-Lidman, Ali Zargham-Boroujeni, Joakim Öhlén & Astrid Norberg - 2017 - Nursing Ethics 24 (3):349-361.
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  • Impact of Moral Sensitivity on Moral Distress Among Psychiatric Nurses.Kayoko Ohnishi, Kazuyo Kitaoka, Jun Nakahara, Maritta Välimäki, Raija Kontio & Minna Anttila - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics:096973301775126.
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  • Demographic Factors Associated with Moral Sensitivity Among Nursing Students.Hanna Tuvesson & Kim Lützén - 2017 - Nursing Ethics 24 (7):847-855.