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  1. Workplace Surveillance, Privacy and Distributive Justice.Lucas D. Introna - 2000 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 30 (4):33-39.
    Modern technologies are providing unprecedented opportunities for surveillance. In the workplace surveillance technology is being built into the very infrastructure of work. Can the employee legitimately resist this increasingly pervasive net of surveillance? The employers argue that workplace surveillance is essential for security, safety, and productivity in increasingly competitive markets. They argue that they have a right to ensure that they 'get what they pay for', furthermore, that the workplace is a place of 'work' which by its very definition excludes (...)
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  • Privacy Self-Management and the Issue of Privacy Externalities: Of Thwarted Expectations, and Harmful Exploitation.Simeon de Brouwer - 2020 - Internet Policy Review 9 (4).
    This article argues that the self-management of one’s privacy is impossible due to privacy externalities. Privacy externalities are the negative by-product of the services offered by some data controllers, whereby the price to ‘pay’ for a service includes not just the provision of the user’s own personal data, but also that of others. This term, related to similar concepts from the literature on privacy such as ‘networked privacy’ or ‘data pollution’, is used here to bring to light the incentives and (...)
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  • Four Challenges for a Theory of Informational Privacy.Luciano Floridi - 2006 - Ethics and Information Technology 8 (3):109-119.
    In this article, I summarise the ontological theory of informational privacy (an approach based on information ethics) and then discuss four types of interesting challenges confronting any theory of informational privacy: (1) parochial ontologies and non-Western approaches to informational privacy; (2) individualism and the anthropology of informational privacy; (3) the scope and limits of informational privacy; and (4) public, passive and active informational privacy. I argue that the ontological theory of informational privacy can cope with such challenges fairly successfully. In (...)
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  • Privacy Concerns in Integrating Big Data in “E-Oman”.Stuti Saxena - 2017 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 15 (4):385-396.
    Purpose Whereas integration of big data in “e-Oman” – the e-government face of Oman – is a significant prospect, this paper aims to underscore the challenges of privacy concerns in effecting such integration. Design/methodology/approach Providing a brief description about the concepts of e-government and big data, the paper follows a discussion on “e-Oman”. While drawing a framework for integration of big data in “e-Oman”, the paper throws light on the privacy concerns in effecting such an integration following a qualitative approach. (...)
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  • Privacy in the Information Age: Stakeholders, Interests and Values. [REVIEW]Lucas Introna & Athanasia Pouloudi - 1999 - Journal of Business Ethics 22 (1):27 - 38.
    Privacy is a relational and relative concept that has been defined in a variety of ways. In this paper we offer a systematic discussion of potentially different notions of privacy. We conclude that privacy as the freedom or immunity from the judgement of others is an extremely useful concept to develop ways in which to understand privacy claims and associated risks. To this end, we develop a framework of principles that explores the interrelations of interests and values for various stakeholders (...)
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  • Employer’s Use of Social Networking Sites: A Socially Irresponsible Practice.Leigh A. Clark & Sherry J. Roberts - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (4):507-525.
    The Internet has drastically changed how people interact, communicate, conduct business, seek jobs, find partners, and shop. Millions of people are using social networking sites to connect with others, and employers are using these sites as a source of background information on job applicants. Employers report making decisions not to hire people based on the information posted on social networking sites. Few employers have policies in place to govern when and how these online character checks should be used and how (...)
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  • Online Diaries: Reflections on Trust, Privacy, and Exhibitionism. [REVIEW]Paul B. de Laat - 2008 - Ethics and Information Technology 10 (1):57-69.
    Trust between transaction partners in cyberspace has come to be considered a distinct possibility. In this article the focus is on the conditions for its creation by way of assuming, not inferring trust. After a survey of its development over the years (in the writings of authors like Luhmann, Baier, Gambetta, and Pettit), this mechanism of trust is explored in a study of personal journal blogs. After a brief presentation of some technicalities of blogging and authors’ motives for writing their (...)
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  • Employer’s Use of Social Networking Sites: A Socially Irresponsible Practice. [REVIEW]Leigh A. Clark & Sherry J. Roberts - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (4):507 - 525.
    The Internet has drastically changed how people interact, communicate, conduct business, seek jobs, find partners, and shop. Millions of people are using social networking sites to connect with others, and employers are using these sites as a source of background information on jobapplicants.Employers report making decisions not to hire people based on the information posted on social networking sites. Few employers have policies in place to govern when and how these online character checks should be used and how to ensure (...)
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  • Locating a Space for Ethics to Appear in Decision-Making: Privacy as an Exemplar. [REVIEW]William Bonner - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 70 (3):221 - 234.
    Using concepts from Ulrich Beck’s Risk Society, this paper argues that as expertise proliferates questions of ethics in decision-making fall through gaps between domains of expertise. As a consequence, unethical outcomes are unattached to actions taken with no one accountable or responsible for these outcomes. Using Actor-Network Theory (ANT), a case study is presented showing how the sale of students’ personal information by the Calgary Board of Education (CBE) escaped questions of ethics. The sale of student information was the product (...)
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  • The Counter‐Control Revolution: “Silent Control” of Individuals Through Dataveillance Systems.Yohko Orito - 2011 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 9 (1):5-19.
  • A Critical Contribution to Theoretical Foundations of Privacy Studies.Thomas Allmer - 2011 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 9 (2):83-101.
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  • Rethinking the Concept of the Right to Information Privacy: A Japanese Perspective.Kiyoshi Murata & Yohko Orito - 2008 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 6 (3):233-245.
  • Locating a Space for Ethics to Appear in Decision-Making: Privacy as an Exemplar.William Bonner - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 70 (3):221-234.
    Using concepts from Ulrich Beck's Risk Society, this paper argues that as expertise proliferates questions of ethics in decision-making fall through gaps between domains of expertise. As a consequence, unethical outcomes are unattached to actions taken with no one accountable or responsible for these outcomes. Using Actor-Network Theory, a case study is presented showing how the sale of students' personal information by the Calgary Board of Education escaped questions of ethics. The sale of student information was the product of the (...)
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  • Philosophy, Privacy, and Pervasive Computing.Diane P. Michelfelder - 2010 - AI and Society 25 (1):61-70.
    Philosophers and others concerned with the moral good of personal privacy most often see threats to privacy raised by the development of pervasive computing as primarily being threats to the loss of control over personal information. Two reasons in particular lend this approach plausibility. One reason is that the parallels between pervasive computing and ordinary networked computing, where everyday transactions over the Internet raise concerns about personal information privacy, appear stronger than their differences. Another reason is that the individual devices (...)
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