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The Lyotard Reader

Blackwell (1989)

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  1. Phrasing, Linking, Judging: Communication and Critical Phenomenology. [REVIEW]Andrew R. Smith - 1994 - Human Studies 17 (1):139 - 161.
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  • The Diogenes Complex: Sublime Living in Irrational Times.Daniel Rubinstein - manuscript
    From Kant to postmodernism the idea of the sublime was always tied with questions of ethics and politics. Kant saw the sublime as a proof that rationality triumphs over nature, validating law and judgement through the subjective experience of pleasure and pain. Lyotard saw in the sublime a symptom of a crisis at which rationality reaches its limit, and subjectivity is confronted with its own collapse. As this chapter will show, both these approaches are inadequate to account for the sublime (...)
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  • Democracy and Pornography: On Speech, Rights, Privacies, and Pleasures in Conflict.Margret Grebowicz - 2011 - Hypatia 26 (1):150 - 165.
    This article investigates the intersections of secrecy/interiority, the state, and speech/ expression, and their implications for the rights of women. I propose a critique of commercial pornography that reanimates MacKinnon's claim that pornography and American democracy are in a relationship of mutual reinforcement, and incorporates poststructuralist (Lyotard, Baudrillard, and Butler) commitments to secrecy and unintelligibility, as well as their role in the production of pleasure.
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  • The ‘Cosmopolitan’ Self Does Her Homework.Marianna Papastephanou - 2011 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (4):597-612.
    Cosmopolitan concern for the whole world is often treated as oppositional to particular collectivities, to corresponding sensibilities and to the obligations that follow from them. Tensions revolve around demands made upon the self and infuse educational discourse accordingly. Culturalism approaches the self as a culturally or multiculturally shaped identity, monopolises the terrain of cosmopolitan debate and narrows the scope of cosmopolitan education only to encouraging hybridity of selfhood and to cultivating respect and tolerance of global diversity. In this article, I (...)
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  • Time and the Event.Andrew Quick - 1998 - Cultural Values 2 (2-3):223-242.
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