Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. The Internet as Friend or Foe of Intellectual Freedom.Elizabeth Buchanan - 2004 - International Review of Information Ethics 2.
    What a long strange trip the Internet has had. From its inception and use by the American military to the billions of users world-wide who log on daily, the Internet is both the promise of access to information and the peril of surveillance and a means of curtailing intellectual freedom. This paper will review this continuum, paying close attention to recent developments in the United States that fuel the dichotomous debate surrounding intellectual freedom.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Women in Conflict: On the Moral Knowledge of Daughters‐in‐Law and Mothers‐in‐Law.R. Linn & S. Breslerman - 1996 - Journal of Moral Education 25 (3):291-307.
    Abstract Little is known about the family setting and the role of family education in a setting where ?intimacy and justice are intertwined? (Okin, 1989). Most intriguing is the unique moral and complex relationship between mother?in?law and daughter?in?law: what is the nature of these two women's failure to maintain harmony between themselves even though the literature suggests that they are predominantly care?orientated? The following paper questions whether there is a problematic relationship between Israeli mothers?in?law and their daughters?in?law. It further attempts (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Ethical Decisions at the Heart of Teaching: Making Sense From a Constructivist Perspective.Deborah J. Tippins, Kenneth G. Tobin & Karl Hook - 1993 - Journal of Moral Education 22 (3):221-240.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Gilligan on Justice and Care: Two Interpretations.G. J. Vreeke - 1991 - Journal of Moral Education 20 (1):33-46.
    Abstract This article illustrates that Gilligan's distinction between an ethic of justice and an ethic of care is interpreted in two ways. Some authors conceive this distinction in terms of content (different rules and values); while others regard the distinction as one of form (different ways of thinking). It is argued that Gilligan's views allow for both interpretations. Finally, a way to an inclusive interpretation is shown.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations