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  1. If You Love the Forest, Then Do Not Kill the Trees: Health Care and a Place for the Particular.Nicholas Colgrove - 2021 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 46 (3):255-271.
    There are numerous ways in which “the particular”—particular individuals, particular ideologies, values, beliefs, and perspectives—are sometimes overlooked, ignored, or even driven out of the healthcare profession. In many such cases, this is bad for patients, practitioners, and the profession. Hence, we should seek to find a place for the particular in health care. Specific topics that I examine in this essay include distribution of health care based on the particular needs of patients, the importance of protecting physicians’ right to conscientious (...)
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  • A Genealogy of Autonomy: Freedom, Paternalism, and the Future of the Doctor–Patient Relationship.Quentin I. T. Genuis - 2021 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 46 (3):330-349.
    Although the principle of respect for personal autonomy has been the subject of debate for almost 40 years, the conversation has often suffered from lack of clarity regarding the philosophical traditions underlying this principle. In this article, I trace a genealogy of autonomy, first contrasting Kant’s autonomy as moral obligation and Mill’s teleological political liberty. I then show development from Mill’s concept to Beauchamp and Childress’ principle and to Julian Savulescu’s non-teleological autonomy sketch. I argue that, although the reach for (...)
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  • The History of Autonomy in Medicine From Antiquity to Principlism.Toni C. Saad - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (1):125-137.
    Respect for Autonomy has been a mainstay of medical ethics since its enshrinement as one of the four principles of biomedical ethics by Beauchamp and Childress’ in the late 1970s. This paper traces the development of this modern concept from Antiquity to the present day, paying attention to its Enlightenment origins in Kant and Rousseau. The rapid C20th developments of bioethics and RFA are then considered in the context of the post-war period and American socio-political thought. The validity and utility (...)
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  • The Inviolateness of Life and Equal Protection: A Defense of the ‘Dead Donor’ Rule.Adam Omelianchuk - forthcoming - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics.
    There are increasing calls for rejecting the ‘dead donor’ rule and permitting ‘organ donation euthanasia’ in organ transplantation. I argue that the fundamental problem with this proposal is that it would bestow more worth on the organs than the donor who has them. What is at stake is the basis of human equality, which, I argue, should be based on an ineliminable dignity that each of us has in virtue of having a rational nature. To allow mortal harvesting would be (...)
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  • Respect.Robin S. Dillon - 2018 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  • Supported Decision Making With People at the Margins of Autonomy.Andrew Peterson, Jason Karlawish & Emily Largent - forthcoming - American Journal of Bioethics:1-21.
    This article argues that supported decision making is ideal for people with dynamic cognitive and functional impairments that place them at the margins of autonomy. First, we argue that guardianshi...
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  • Ambiguity, Death Determination, and the Dead Donor Rule.Will Lyon - 2018 - Clinical Ethics 13 (4):165-171.
    The dead donor rule states that organ donors must be declared dead before any vital organs are removed. Recently, scholars and physicians have argued for the abandonment of the dead donor rule, based on the rule’s supposed connection with the concept of brain death, which they view as a conceptually unreliable definition of death. In this essay, I distinguish between methods of death determination and the question of whether or not the dead donor rule should be a guiding principle of (...)
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  • The Rhetoric of the ‘Passive Patient’ in Indian Medical Negligence Cases.Supriya Subramani - 2019 - Asian Bioethics Review 11 (4):349-366.
    In this paper, I examine the rhetoric employed by court judgements, with a particular emphasis on the narrative construct of the ‘passive patient’. This construction advances and reinforces paternalistic values, which have scant regard for the patients’ preferences, values, or choices within the legal context. Further, I critique the rhetoric employed and argue that the use of this rhetoric is the basis for a precedent that limits the understanding and respect of patients. Through this paper, I present the contemporary use (...)
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  • Demonstrating ‘Respect for Persons’ in Clinical Research: Findings From Qualitative Interviews with Diverse Genomics Research Participants.Stephanie A. Kraft, Erin Rothwell, Seema K. Shah, Devan M. Duenas, Hannah Lewis, Kristin Muessig, Douglas J. Opel, Katrina A. B. Goddard & Benjamin S. Wilfond - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2020-106440.
    The ethical principle of ‘respect for persons’ in clinical research has traditionally focused on protecting individuals’ autonomy rights, but respect for participants also includes broader, although less well understood, ethical obligations to regard individuals’ rights, needs, interests and feelings. However, there is little empirical evidence about how to effectively convey respect to potential and current participants. To fill this gap, we conducted exploratory, qualitative interviews with participants in a clinical genomics implementation study. We interviewed 40 participants in English or Spanish (...)
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  • Understanding Respect: Learning From Patients.N. W. Dickert & N. E. Kass - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (7):419-423.
    Background: The importance of respecting patients and participants in clinical research is widely recognised. However, what it means to respect persons beyond recognising them as autonomous is unclear, and little is known about what patients find to be respectful. Objective: To understand patients’ conceptions of respect and what it means to be respected by medical providers. Design: Qualitative study from an academic cardiology clinic, using semistructured interviews with 18 survivors of sudden cardiac death. Results: Patients believed that respecting persons incorporates (...)
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  • Respect for Persons in Bioethics: Towards a Human Rights-Based Account.Johan Brännmark - 2017 - Human Rights Review 18 (2):171-187.
    Human rights have increasingly been put forward as an important framework for bioethics. In this paper, it is argued that human rights offer a potentially fruitful approach to understanding the notion of Respect for Persons in bioethics. The idea that we are owed a certain kind of respect as persons is relatively common, but also quite often understood in terms of respecting people’s autonomous choices. Such accounts do however risk being too narrow, reducing some human beings to a second-class moral (...)
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  • Docile Bodies: Transnational Research Ethics as Biopolitics.M. T. Lysaught - 2009 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 34 (4):384-408.
    This essay explores the claim that bioethics has become a mode of biopolitics. It seeks to illuminate one of the myriad of ways that bioethics joins other institutionalized discursive practices in the task of producing, organizing, and managing the bodies—of policing and controlling populations—in order to empower larger institutional agents. The focus of this analysis is the contemporary practice of transnational biomedical research. The analysis is catalyzed by the enormous transformation in the political economy of transnational research that has occurred (...)
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  • Values and Value Conflicts in Implementation and Use of Preconception Expanded Carrier Screening - an Expert Interview Study.Amal Matar, Mats G. Hansson & Anna T. Höglund - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):25.
    Endeavors have been made to found and incorporate ethical values in most aspects of healthcare, including health technology assessment. Health technologies and their assessment are value-laden and could trigger problems with dissemination if they contradict societal norms. Per WHO definition, preconception expanded carrier screening is a new health technology that warrants assessment. It is a genetic test offered to couples who have no known risk of recessive genetic diseases and are interested pregnancy. A test may screen for carrier status of (...)
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  • Nursing Involvement in Euthanasia: How Sound is the Philosophical Support?: Original Article.Helen McCabe - 2007 - Nursing Philosophy 8 (3):167-175.
  • [Re]Considering Respect for Persons in a Globalizing World.Aasim I. Padela, Aisha Y. Malik, Farr Curlin & Raymond De Vries - 2015 - Developing World Bioethics 15 (2):98-106.
    Contemporary clinical ethics was founded on principlism, and the four principles: respect for autonomy, nonmaleficence, beneficence and justice, remain dominant in medical ethics discourse and practice. These principles are held to be expansive enough to provide the basis for the ethical practice of medicine across cultures. Although principlism remains subject to critique and revision, the four-principle model continues to be taught and applied across the world. As the practice of medicine globalizes, it remains critical to examine the extent to which (...)
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