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  1. The Conditions of Our Freedom: Foucault, Organization, and Ethics.Andrew Crane, David Knights & Ken Starkey - 2008 - Business Ethics Quarterly 18 (3):299-320.
    The paper examines the contribution of the French philosopher Michel Foucault to the subject of ethics in organizations. The paper combines an analysis of Foucault’s work on discipline and control, with an examination of his later work on the ethical subject and technologies of the self. Our paper argues that the work of the later Foucault provides an important contribution to business ethics theory, practice and pedagogy. We discuss how it offers an alternative avenue to traditional normative ethical theory that (...)
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  • Embedding Corporate Social Responsibility in Corporate Governance: A Stakeholder Systems Approach.Chris Mason & John Simmons - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 119 (1):77-86.
    Current research on corporate social responsibility (CSR) illustrates the growing sense of discord surrounding the ‘business of doing good’ (Dobers and Springett, Corp Soc Responsib Environ Manage 17(2):63–69, 2010). Central to these concerns is that CSR risks becoming an over-simplified and peripheral part of corporate strategy. Rather than transforming the dominant corporate discourse, it is argued that CSR and related concepts are limited to “emancipatory rhetoric…defined by narrow business interests and serve to curtail interests of external stakeholders.” (Banerjee, Crit Sociol (...)
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  • Focusing on Individuals' Ethical Judgement in Corporate Social Responsibility Curricula.Patrick Maclagan & Tim Campbell - 2011 - Business Ethics 20 (4):392-404.
    Adequate discussion of individuals' moral deliberation is notably absent from much of the literature on corporate social responsibility (CSR). We argue for a refocusing on the role of the individual in that context. In particular we regard this as important in CSR course design, for practical, pedagogical and moral reasons. After addressing some of the theoretical background to our argument, and noting some respects in which individual action features in the context of CSR, we consider the usefulness (or otherwise) of (...)
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  • An Enquiry Into the Ethical Efficacy of the Use of Radio Frequency Identification Technology.David M. Wasieleski & Mordechai Gal-Or - 2008 - Ethics and Information Technology 10 (1):27-40.
    This paper provides an in-depth analysis of the privacy rights dilemma surrounding radio frequency identification (RFID) technology. As one example of ubiquitous information system, RFID has multitudinous applications in various industries and businesses across society. The use of this technology will have to lead to a policy setting dilemma in that a balance between individuals’ privacy concerns and the benefits that they derive from it must be drawn. After describing the basic RFID technology some of its most prevalent uses, a (...)
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  • How Can Mindfulness Enhance Moral Reasoning? An Examination Using Business School Students.Ashish Pandey, Rajesh Chandwani & Ajinkya Navare - 2018 - Business Ethics: A European Review 27 (1):56-71.
    Given the comprehensive influence of mindfulness on human thought and behavior, and the importance of moral reasoning in business decisions, we examine the role of mindfulness as an antecedent to moral reasoning through two studies. In Study 1, we propose and test a theoretically derived model that links mindfulness and moral reasoning, mediated by compassion and egocentric bias using a survey design. In Study 2, we examine whether mindfulness training enhances moral reasoning using an experimental design with graduate students of (...)
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  • Leadership and the Deified/Demonic: A Cultural Examination of CEO Sanctification.Edward Wray-Bliss - 2012 - Business Ethics 21 (4):434-449.
    I examine in this paper deification and demonisation – the social attribution of absolute ‘Good’ and ‘Evil’ to individuals or individual entities. Specifically, I unpack ways that evilness and goodness have become personified in the figure of the chief executive officer in contemporary, particularly US, business culture. Showing both the readily accessible and widely used nature of these religious tropes, I nevertheless argue that both deification and demonisation have ethically and politically disempowering effects for organisational members, the wider citizenry, and (...)
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  • Forward Looking or Looking Unaffordable? Utilising Academic Perspectives on Corporate Social Responsibility to Assess the Factors Influencing its Adoption by Business.Chris Mason & John Simmons - 2011 - Business Ethics: A European Review 20 (2):159-176.
    The paper demonstrates its ‘CSR at a tipping point’ thesis by juxtaposing views of corporate social responsibility (CSR) as essential for business and societal sustainability against those that see CSR as unaffordable or irrelevant in the current economic climate. Drawing from Kohlberg's seminal theory of moral development, CSR is conceptualised as the development of organisation moral reasoning, and the proposition is illustrated by demonstrating inter-disciplinary similarities in levels of ethical concern within different approaches to the practice of marketing, human resource (...)
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  • Codes of Ethics in the Light of Fairness and Harm.Dan Munter - 2013 - Business Ethics: A European Review 22 (2):174-188.
    Nine codes of ethics from companies in the Swedish financial sector were subjected to a content analysis to determine how they address and treat employees. The codes say a great deal about employee conduct and misconduct but next to nothing about employee rights, their rightful expectations or their value to the firm. The normative analysis – echoing some of the value-based HRM literature – draws on the foundational values of respect, equality, reciprocity and care. The analysis shows that most of (...)
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  • Focusing on Individuals' Ethical Judgement in Corporate Social Responsibility Curricula.Patrick Maclagan & Tim Campbell - 2011 - Business Ethics: A European Review 20 (4):392-404.
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