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  1. Citizen Science Fiction: The Potential of Situated Speculative Prototyping for Public Engagement on Emerging Technologies.Jantien W. Schuijer, Jacqueline E. W. Broerse & Frank Kupper - 2021 - NanoEthics 15 (1):1-18.
    In response to calls for a research and innovation system that is more open to public scrutiny, we have seen a growth of formal and informal public engagement activities in the past decades. Nevertheless, critiques of several persistent routines in public engagement continue to resurface, in particular the focus on expert knowledge, cognitive exchange, risk discourse, and understandings of public opinion as being static. In an attempt to break out of these routines, we experimented with an innovative engagement format that (...)
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  • Valuing Biomarker Diagnostics for Dementia Care: Enhancing the Reflection of Patients, Their Care-Givers and Members of the Wider Public.Simone van der Burg, Floris H. B. M. Schreuder, Catharina J. M. Klijn & Marcel M. Verbeek - 2019 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 22 (3):439-451.
    What is the value of an early diagnosis of dementia in the absence of effective treatment? There has been a lively scholarly debate over this question, but until now patients have not played a large role in it. Our study supplements biomedical research into innovative diagnostics with an exlporation of its meanings and values according to patients. Based on seven focusgroups with patients and their care-givers, we conclude that stakeholders evaluate early diagnostics with respect to whether and how they expect (...)
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  • Assembling Upstream Engagement: The Case of the Portuguese Deliberative Forum on Nanotechnologies.António Carvalho & João Arriscado Nunes - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (2):99-113.
    This article analyzes a deliberative forum on nanotechnologies, organized in Portugal within the scope of the research project DEEPEN—Deepening Ethical Engagement and Participation in Emerging Nanotechnologies. This event included scientists, science communicators and members of the “lay public”, and resulted in a position document which summarizes collective aspirations and concerns related to nano. Drawing upon our previous experience with focus groups on nanotechnologies—characterized by methodological innovations that aimed at suspending epistemological inequalities between participants—this paper delves into the performativity of the (...)
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  • Calibrating the Balance: The Ethics of Regulating the Production and Use of Nanotechnology Applications.Michael Vlerick - 2021 - In G. Jeswani & M. Van de Voorde (eds.), Handbook of Nanoethics. De Gruyter.
    Nanotechnology (henceforth NT) is a rapidly advancing field with the potential of revolutionizing diverse areas such as electronics, healthcare, transport and energy production. NT products and applications come with (potential) benefits and (potential) harms. The presence of potential harms calls for regulation. Both under- and overregulation – I argue – are morally undesirable. In the case of underregulation, stakeholders fall victim to the harmful effects of the technology. In the case of overregulation, stakeholders are deprived of the benefits of the (...)
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  • The Power of Analogies for Imagining and Governing Emerging Technologies.Claudia Schwarz-Plaschg - 2018 - NanoEthics 12 (2):139-153.
    The emergence of new technologies regularly involves comparisons with previous innovations. For instance, analogies with asbestos and genetically modified organisms have played a crucial role in the early societal debate about nanotechnology. This article explores the power of analogies in such debates and how they could be effectively and responsibly employed for imagining and governing emerging technologies in general and nanotechnology in particular. First, the concept of analogical imagination is developed to capture the explorative and anticipatory potential of analogies. Yet (...)
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  • The Nanotechnological Golem.Alexei Grinbaum - 2010 - NanoEthics 4 (3):191-198.
    We give reasons for the importance of old narratives, including myths, in ethical thinking about science and technology. On the example of a legend about creating artificial men we explore the side effects of having too much success and the problem of intermediate social status of bioengineered artefacts.
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  • The Narratology of Lay Ethics.Jean-Pierre Dupuy - 2010 - NanoEthics 4 (2):153-170.
    The five narratives identified by the DEEPEN-project are interpreted in terms of the ancient story of desire, evil, and the sacred, and the modern narratives of alienation and exploitation. The first three narratives of lay ethics do not take stock of what has radically changed in the modern world under the triple and joint evolution of science, religion, and philosophy. The modern narratives, in turn, are in serious need of a post-modern deconstruction. Both critiques express the limits of humanism. They (...)
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  • Narratives of Quantum Theory in the Age of Quantum Technologies.Alexei Grinbaum - 2017 - Ethics and Information Technology 19 (4):295-306.
    Quantum technologies can be presented to the public with or without introducing a strange trait of quantum theory responsible for their non-classical efficiency. Traditionally the message was centered on the superposition principle, while entanglement and properties such as contextuality have been gaining ground recently. A less theoretical approach is focused on simple protocols that enable technological applications. It results in a pragmatic narrative built with the help of the resource paradigm and principle-based reconstructions. I discuss the advantages and weaknesses of (...)
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  • A Lay Ethics Quest for Technological Futures: About Tradition, Narrative and Decision-Making.Simone van der Burg - 2016 - NanoEthics 10 (3):233-244.
    Making better choices about future technologies that are being researched or developed is an important motivator behind lay ethics interventions. However, in practice, they do not always succeed to serve that goal. Especially authors who have noted that lay ethicists sometimes take recourse to well-known themes which stem from old, even ‘archetypical’ stories, have been criticized for making too little room for agency and decision-making in their approach. This paper aims to contribute to a reflection on how lay ethics can (...)
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  • Narrative, Nanotechnology and the Accomplishment of Public Responses: A Response to Thorstensen.Matthew Kearnes, Phil Macnaghten & Sarah R. Davies - 2014 - NanoEthics 8 (3):241-250.
    In this paper, we respond to a critique by Erik Thorstensen of the ‘Deepening Ethical Engagement and Participation in Emerging Nanotechnologies’ project concerning its ‘realist’ treatment of narrative, its restricted analytical framework and resources, its apparent confusion in focus and its unjustified contextualisation and overextension of its findings. We show that these criticisms are based on fairly serious misunderstandings of the DEEPEN project, its interdisciplinary approachand its conceptual context. Having responded to Thorstensen’s criticisms, we take the opportunity to clarify and (...)
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  • Public Involvement and Narrative Fallacies of Nanotechnologies.Erik Thorstensen - 2014 - NanoEthics 8 (3):227-240.
    This paper analyzes a European research project called ‘Deepening Ethical Engagement and Participation in Emerging Nanotechnologies’ with the abbreviation DEEPEN. The DEEPEN’s findings and conclusions on the narratives, public understandings and the lay ethics of nanotechnologies are examined in a critical manner. Through a criticism of the theoretical framings of what constitutes a narrative and the application of a different theoretical framing of narratives, the paper argues that the findings and conclusion of the DEEPEN should be approached with caution as (...)
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  • Strong Will in a Messy World. Ethics and the Government of Technoscience.Luigi Pellizzoni - 2012 - NanoEthics 6 (3):257-272.
    Two features characterize new and emerging technosciences. The first one is the production of peculiar ontologies. The human agent is confronted with a biophysical world the contingent, indeterminate character of which does not hamper but expands the scope of purposeful action. Uncertainty is increasingly regarded as a resource for an expanding will rather than a drawback for a disoriented agent. The second feature is that ethics is increasingly considered as the core regulatory means of this messy, ever-changing world. The ambivalences (...)
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  • Beyond Conversation: Some Lessons for Nanoethics. [REVIEW]Alfred Nordmann - 2010 - NanoEthics 4 (2):171-181.
    One of the aims of the DEEPEN project was to deepen ethical understanding of issues related to emerging nanotechnologies through an interdisciplinary approach utilizing insights from philosophy, ethics, and the social sciences. Accordingly, part of its final report was dedicated to the question of what was accomplished with regards to this aim and what further research is required. It relates two insights: Nanotechnologies intensify the ambivalence of ongoing, long-term developments; and yet, our intuitions and received story-lines fail us as a (...)
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  • Quibbling and the Fallacy of Critical Scholarship: Response to Thorstensen.Heidrun Åm - 2014 - NanoEthics 8 (3):251-254.
    In this text, I respond to a paper by Erik Thorstensen entitled “Public Involvement and Narrative Fallacies of Nanotechnologies.” In his paper, Thorstensen critically reviews a previous ELSA project on engagement and nanotechnology known by the acronym DEEPEN. While I agree that the ELSA community could benefit from the critical examination of earlier research, I believe the approach taken by Thorstensen is not a constructive one. My response deals with three main issues: the character of the paper, narrative theory, and (...)
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