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  1. East–West Differences in Perception of Brain Death.Qing Yang & Geoffrey Miller - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (2):211-225.
    The concept of brain death as equivalent to cardiopulmonary death was initially conceived following developments in neuroscience, critical care, and transplant technology. It is now a routine part of medicine in Western countries, including the United States. In contrast, Eastern countries have been reluctant to incorporate brain death into legislation and medical practice. Several countries, most notably China, still lack laws recognizing brain death and national medical standards for making the diagnosis. The perception is that Asians are less likely to (...)
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  • The History of Autonomy in Medicine From Antiquity to Principlism.Toni C. Saad - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (1):125-137.
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  • Acceptance in Theory but Not Practice – Chinese Medical Providers’ Perception of Brain Death.Qing Yang, Yi Fan, Qian Cheng, Xin Li, Kaveh Khoshnood & Geoffrey Miller - 2015 - Neuroethics 8 (3):299-313.
    BackgroundThe brain death standard allowing a declaration of death based on neurological criteria is legally endorsed and routinely practiced in the West but not in Asia. In China, attempts to legalize the brain death standard have occurred several times without success. Cultural, religious, and philosophical factors have been proposed to explain this difference, but there is a lack of empirical studies to support this hypothesis.Methods476 medical providers from three academic hospitals in Hunan, China, completed a selfadministered survey including a 12-question (...)
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