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  1. Geographic Location and Moral Arbitrariness in the Allocation of Donated Livers.Douglas MacKay & Samuel Fitz - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (2):308-319.
    The federal system for allocating donated livers in the United States is often criticized for allowing geographic disparities in access to livers. Critics argue that such disparities are unfair on the grounds that where one lives is morally arbitrary and so should not influence one's access to donated livers. They argue instead that livers should be allocated in accordance with the equal opportunity principle, according to which US residents who are equally sick should have the same opportunity to receive a (...)
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  • Nudging and the Ecological and Social Roots of Human Agency.Nicolae Morar & Daniel Kelly - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (11):15-17.
  • Nudges in a Post-Truth World.Neil Levy - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (8):495-500.
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  • Nudges, Autonomy, and Organ Donor Registration Policies: Response to Critics.Douglas MacKay - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (2):W4 - W8.
  • Organ Donor Registration Reconsidered: How Current Practices Strain Autonomy.Johan Christiaan Bester & Jed Adam Gross - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (11):33-35.
  • Issues With Tissues.Emily Largent - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (11):37-39.
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  • Organ Donor Registration Policies and the Wrongness of Forcing People to Think of Their Own Death.Tomasz Żuradzki & Katarzyna Marchewka - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (11):35-37.
    MacKay and Robinson (2016) claim that some legal procedures that regulate organ donations (VAC, opt-in, opt-out) bypass people's rational capacities and thus are “potentially morally worse than MAC”, which only employs a very mild form of coercion. We provide a critique of their argumentation and defend the opposite thesis: MAC is potentially morally worse than the three other options.
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  • Beyond Influence and Autonomy: Expanding the Scope of Ethical Considerations in Organ Donation Registration.Jeffrey Kirby - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (11):31-33.
  • Getting Degrees of Wrongness Right: Nudges and Value of Agency.Philip Robichaud - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (11):28-30.
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  • “Nudging” Deceased Donation Through an Opt-Out System: A Libertarian Approach or Manipulation?David Rodrıguez-Arias & Myfanwy Morgan - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (11):25-28.
  • On Blind Spots, Moral Obligations, and Collective Action Problems.Gil Siegal - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (11):20-22.
  • Autonomy Means Having to Make a Choice.Michael Shapiro & Frances Ward - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (11):19-20.
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  • Nudge This: It is a Rational Fact That Donors Can Save the 22 People Who Die Daily Awaiting Organ Transplantation.Michael C. Freed - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (11):22-25.
  • Rights, Nudging, and the Good of Others.Luke Gelinas - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (11):17-19.
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  • Gunmen and Ice Cream Cones: Harm to Autonomy and Harm to Persons.J. S. Blumenthal-Barby & Peter A. Ubel - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (11):13-14.
  • Autonomy by Default.Cass R. Sunstein - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (11):1-2.
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