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  1. Cultivating Practical Wisdom as Education.Aaron Marshall & Malcolm Thorburn - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (14):1-13.
    This article argues, from a critical realist perspective, that it would be beneficial to extend thinking on how personal and social education could become more central to students’ learning. We explore how constructive-informed arrangements which emphasize cognitive skills and affective qualities could be realized through experiential approaches to learning. Our theorizing is informed by neo-Aristotelian thinking on the importance of identifying mutually acceptable value commitments which can cultivate practical wisdom as well as generally benefit society. Thereafter, we outline how the (...)
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  • Dewey as Virtue Epistemologist: Open‐Mindedness and the Training of Thought in Democracy and Education.Ben Kotzee - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 52 (2):359-373.
  • Searching for Excellence in Education: Knowledge, Virtue and Presence?James MacAllister, Gale Macleod & Anne Pirrie - 2013 - Ethics and Education 8 (2):153-165.
    This article addresses two main questions: what is excellence and should epistemic excellence be the main purpose of education? Though references to excellence have become increasingly frequent in the UK education policy, these questions are perhaps especially important in Scotland where the curriculum is explicitly for excellence. Following Hirst and Peters, it is hypothesised that if the term ‘education’ implies possession of a certain breadth of general knowledge and understanding, then the term ‘excellence’ may imply a deep grasp of a (...)
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  • Virtue, Practical Wisdom and Character in Teaching.Sandra Cooke & David Carr - 2014 - British Journal of Educational Studies 62 (2):91-110.
    Recent reflection on the professional knowledge of teachers has been marked by a shift away from more reductive competence and skill-focused models of teaching towards a view of teacher expertise as involving complex context-sensitive deliberation and judgement. Much of this shift has been inspired by an Aristotelian conception of practical wisdom also linked by Aristotle to the development of virtue and character. This has in turn led recent educational philosophers and theorists – inspired by latter-day developments in virtue ethics and (...)
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  • Extended Virtue Epistemology.Duncan Pritchard - 2018 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 61 (5-6):632-647.
    What does it take to convert the deliverances of an extended cognitive process into knowledge? It is argued that virtue epistemology, at least of an epistemic externalist kind, offers the resources to satisfactorily answer this question, provided that one rids the view of its implicit commitment to epistemic individualism. Nonetheless, it is also claimed that while virtue reliabilism can accommodate extended cognition, there are limits to the extent to which virtuous epistemic standings can be extended. In particular, it is argued (...)
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  • Celebrating Moderate Dualism in the Philosophy of Education: A Reflection on the Hirst‐Carr Debate.Khosrow Bagheri Noaparast - 2013 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (4):564-576.
    The position of the philosophy of education in theoretical or practical philosophy was the main subject of debate between Paul Hirst and Wilfred Carr. In his support for practical philosophy, Carr argues that in order to bridge the theory/practice gap and deconstruct the illusory intactness of philosophy of education from developments in the practical realm, philosophy of education should be assumed as a branch of practical philosophy. Opposed to this argument, Hirst holds that philosophy of education is a second‐order activity (...)
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  • Celebrating Moderate Dualism in the Philosophy of Education: A Reflection on the Hirst‐Carr Debate.Khosrow Bagheri Noaparast - 2013 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (4):564-576.
    The position of the philosophy of education in theoretical or practical philosophy was the main subject of debate between Paul Hirst and Wilfred Carr. In his support for practical philosophy, Carr argues that in order to bridge the theory/practice gap and deconstruct the illusory intactness of philosophy of education from developments in the practical realm, philosophy of education should be assumed as a branch of practical philosophy. Opposed to this argument, Hirst holds that philosophy of education is a second-order activity (...)
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  • Educating for Intellectual Virtues: From Theory to Practice.Jason Baehr - 2013 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (2):248-262.
    After a brief overview of what intellectual virtues are, I offer three arguments for the claim that education should aim at fostering ‘intellectual character virtues’ like curiosity, open-mindedness, intellectual courage, and intellectual honesty. I then go on to discuss several pedagogical and related strategies for achieving this aim.
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  • Epistemic Virtue and the Epistemology of Education.Duncan Pritchard - 2013 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (2):236-247.
    A certain conception of the relevance of virtue epistemology to the philosophy of education is set out. On this conception, while the epistemic goal of education might initially be promoting the pupil's cognitive success, it should ultimately move on to the development of the pupil's cognitive agency. A continuum of cognitive agency is described, on which it is ultimately cognitive achievement, and thus understanding, which is the epistemic goal of education. This is contrasted with a view on which knowledge is (...)
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