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  1. The Veil of Philanthropy: Kant on the Political Benefits of Dissimulation and Simulation.Jeffrey Church - 2018 - European Journal of Political Theory.
    Kant has traditionally been read as an excessively moralistic critic of lying in his ethics and politics. In response, recent scholars have noted that for Kant we have an ethical duty not to be com...
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  • Making the Ideal Real: Publicity and Morality in Kant.Melissa Zinkin - 2016 - Kantian Review 21 (2):237-259.
    This article discusses the concept of publicity in Kant’s moral philosophy. Insofar as the concepts of ‘public’ and ‘private’ can describe our relations with others, they can be considered to be moral concepts. I argue that we can find in Kant a moral duty not to keep our maxims of action private, or secret. Whereas Korsgaard argues that sometimes in the face of evil it is permissible to sidestep the moral law, I argue that it is rather through publicity that (...)
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  • Skyrms on the Possibility of Universal Deception.Don Fallis - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (2):375-397.
    In the Groundwork, Immanuel Kant famously argued that it would be self-defeating for everyone to follow a maxim of lying whenever it is to his or her advantage. In his recent book Signals, Brian Skyrms claims that Kant was wrong about the impossibility of universal deception. Skyrms argues that there are Lewisian signaling games in which the sender always sends a signal that deceives the receiver. I show here that these purportedly deceptive signals simply fail to make the receiver as (...)
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  • Avoiding Vice and Pursuing Virtue: Kant on Perfect Duties and ‘Prudential Latitude’.Mavis Biss - 2017 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 98 (4):618-635.
    To fulfill a perfect duty an agent must avoid vice, yet when an agent refrains from acting on a prohibited maxim she still must do something. I argue that the setting of morally required ends ought to consistently inform an agent's judgment regarding what is to be done beyond compliance with perfect, negative duties. Kant's assertion of a puzzling version of latitude of choice within his discussion of perfect duties motivates and complicates the case I make for a more expansive (...)
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  • Langton on Duty and Desolation.Rolf George - 2009 - Kantian Review 14 (1):123-128.