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  1. Models of Memory: Wittgenstein and Cognitive Science.David G. Stern - 1991 - Philosophical Psychology 4 (2):203-18.
  • Truths and Processes: A Critical Approach to Truthmaker Theory.Gustavo Picazo - 2014 - Philosophia 42 (3):713-739.
    The starting point of this paper is the idea that linguistic representation is the result of a global process: a process of interaction of a community of cognitive-linguistic agents, with one another and with the environment. I maintain that the study of truth, meaning and related notions should be addressed without losing perspective of this process, and I oppose the ‘static’ or ‘analytic’ approach, which is fundamentally based on our own knowledge of the conventional meaning of words and sentences, and (...)
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  • Symbols in Wittgenstein's Tractatus.Colin Johnston - 2007 - European Journal of Philosophy 15 (3):367-394.
    This paper is concerned with the status of a symbol in Wittgenstein’s Tractatus. It is claimed in the first section that a Tractarian symbol, whilst essentially a syntactic entity to be distinguished from the mark or sound that is its sign, bears its semantic significance only inessentially. In the second and third sections I pursue this point of exegesis through the Tractarian discussions of nonsense and the context principle respectively. The final section of the paper places the forgoing work in (...)
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  • Stroud on Wittgenstein, Meaning, and Community.Claudine Verheggen - 2005 - Dialogue 44 (1):67-85.
    According to Barry Stroud, Wittgenstein thought that language is social only in this minimal way: we cannot make sense of the idea of someone having a language unless we can describe her as using signs in conformity with the linguistic practices of some community. Since a solitary person could meet this condition, Stroud concludes that, for Wittgenstein, solitary languages are possible. I argue that Wittgenstein in fact thought that language is social in a much more robust way. Solitary languages are (...)
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  • The Community View Revisited.Claudine Verheggen - 2007 - Metaphilosophy 38 (5):612-631.
    Joining a vast Wittgensteinian anti-theoretical movement, John Canfield has argued that it is possible to read the claims that (1) “language is essentially communal” and (2) “it is conceptually possible that a Crusoe isolated from birth should speak or follow rules” in such a way that they are perfectly compatible, and, indeed, that Wittgenstein held them both at once. The key to doing this is to drain them of any theoretical content or implications that would put each claim at odds (...)
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  • Recent Work on Wittgenstein, 1980–1990. [REVIEW]David G. Stern - 1994 - Synthese 98 (3):415-458.
    While Wittgenstein wrote unconventionally and denied that he was advancing philosophical theses, most of his interpreters have attributed conventional philosophical theses to him. But the best recent interpretations have taken the form of his writing and his distinctive way of doing philosophy seriously. The 1980s have also seen the emergence of a body of work on Wittgenstein that makes extensive use of the unpublished Wittgenstein papers. This work on Wittgenstein's method and his way of writing are the main themes of (...)
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  • Truth in the Tractatus.Hans Johann Glock - 2006 - Synthese 148 (2):345 - 368.
    My paper takes issue both with the standard view that the Tractatus contains a correspondence theory and with recent suggestions that it features a deflationary or semantic theory. Standard correspondence interpretations are mistaken, because they treat the isomorphism between a sentence and what it depicts as a sufficient condition of truth rather than of sense. The semantic/deflationary interpretation ignores passages that suggest some kind of correspondence theory. The official theory of truth in the Tractatus is an obtainment theory – a (...)
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  • The Philosophical Psychologism of the Tractatus.Richard McDonough - 1993 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 31 (4):425-447.
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  • ‘THIS is Produced by a Brain-Process!’ Wittgenstein, Transparency and Psychology Today.Paul Standish - 2012 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (1):60-72.
    This paper examines sections of Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations with a view to exposing trail-effects of psychology in educational and social practice today. These are seen in understandings of the relations between mind and body, and language and thought, and their influence is identified in such contemporary preoccupations as accounting transparency and the new science of happiness. A Wittgensteinian critique is offered, with attention paid to the idea that ‘nothing is hidden’. Finally a question is raised as to how far it (...)
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  • Chains of Dependency: On the Disenchantment and the Illusion of Being Free at Last (Part 1).Paul Smeyers - 2012 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (2):177-191.
    Time, space, causality, communicating and acting together set limits on our freedom. Starting from the position of Wittgenstein, who advocates neither a position of pure subjectivity nor of pure objectivity, and taking into account what is implied by initiation into the symbolic order of language and culture, it is argued that the limitations on our freedom are not to be deplored. The problems of conservatism, relativism and scepticism—which confront us often in the context of education and child rearing—are inadequately dealt (...)
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  • Putnam on Realism, Reference and Truth: The Problem with Quantum Mechanics.Christopher Norris - 2001 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 15 (1):65 – 91.
    In this essay, I offer a critical evaluation of Hilary Putnam's writings on epistemology and philosophy of science, in particular his engagement with interpretative problems in quantum mechanics. I trace the development of his thinking from the late 1960s when he adopted a strong causal-realist position on issues of meaning, reference, and truth, via the "internal realist" approach of his middle-period writings, to the various forms of pragmatist, naturalized, or "commonsense" epistemology proposed in his latest books. My contention is that (...)
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  • Thought and Language in the Tractatus.Donna M. Summerfield - 1992 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 17 (1):224-245.
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  • Making Up the Mind: How the Brain Creates Our Mental World.Richard G. T. Gipps - 2009 - Philosophical Psychology 22 (3):393-397.
  • The Power and the Limits of Wittgenstein's N Operator.James W. McGray - 2006 - History and Philosophy of Logic 27 (2):143-169.
    The power of Wittgenstein's N operator described in the Tractatus is that every proposition which can be expressed in the Russellian variant of the predicate calculus familiar to him has an equivalent proposition in an extended variant of his N operator notation. This remains true if the bound variables are understood in the usual inclusive sense or in Wittgenstein's restrictive exclusive sense. The problematic limit of Wittgenstein's N operator comes from his claim that symbols alone reveal the logical status of (...)
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  • Heidegger's Ereignis and Wittgenstein on the Genesis of Language.Richard McDonough - 2014 - Open Journal of Philosophy 4 (3):416-431.
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  • Russell’s Repsychologising of the Proposition.Graham Stevens - 2006 - Synthese 151 (1):99-124.
    Bertrand Russell's 1903 masterpiece "The Principles of Mathematics" places great emphasis on the need to separate propositions from psychological items such as thoughts. In 1919 Russell explicitly retracts this view, however, and defines propositions as "psychological occurrences". These psychological occurrences are held by Russell to be mental images. In this paper, I seek to explain this radical change of heart. I argue that Russell's re-psychologising of the proposition in 1919 can only be understood against the background of his struggle with (...)
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  • Sympathy, Empathy, and the Stream of Consciousness.Thomas Natsoulas - 1988 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 18 (June):169-195.
  • Feeling at Home in Language.Edward H. Minar - 1995 - Synthese 102 (3):413 - 452.
    What do we learn about language from reading Wittgenstein'sPhilosophical Investigations? This question gains urgency from Wittgenstein's alleged animus against philosophical theorizing and his indirectness. Section 1 argues that Wittgenstein's goal is to prevent philosophical questioning about the foundations of language from the beginning. This conception of his aim is not in tension with Wittgenstein's use of the notion of community; community interpretations of his views betray a misguided commitment to the coherence of the idea that language might need grounding. Wittgenstein's (...)
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  • Beyond the Private Language Argument.Paul K. Moser - 1992 - Metaphilosophy 23 (1-2):77-89.
  • Between Metaphysics and Nonsense: Elucidation in Wittgenstein's Tractatus.Marie McGinn - 1999 - Philosophical Quarterly 49 (197):491-513.
    There are currently two readings of Tractatus, the metaphysical and the therapeutic. I argue that neither of these is satisfactory. I develop a third reading, the elucidatory reading. This shares the therapeutic interpretation’s emphasis on the idea that Wittgenstein’s remarks are intended to work on the reader, but instead of seeing these remarks as directed (problematically) at revealing their own nonsensical status, I take the remarks to be aimed at bringing a certain order to the reader’s perception of language. The (...)
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  • "Rethinking" the Preface of the Tractatus.Bruce Howes - 2007 - Philosophical Investigations 30 (1):3–24.
    It is generally considered the case that an authorial preface is an author’s opportunity to give the reader a hand in interpreting the work he or she is about to read. It is strange then that the Preface to Wittgenstein’s Tractatus (1922) has often been overlooked. Max Black’s (1964) influential A Companion toWittgenstein’sTractatus, for example, passes over the Preface in silence. And even in the latest published edition of the so-called Prototractatus (1996), the Preface is the only part that appears (...)
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  • The Necessity for Particularity in Education and Child-Rearing: The Moral Issue.Paul Smeyers - 1992 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 26 (1):63–73.
  • Electric Brain Fields and Memory Traces: Wittgenstein and Gestalt Psychology.Michel Hark - 1995 - Philosophical Investigations 18 (2):113-138.
  • Concept Nativism and the Rule Following Considerations.M. J. Cain - 2006 - Acta Analytica 21 (38):77-101.
    In this paper I argue that the most prominent and familiar features of Wittgenstein’s rule following considerations generate a powerful argument for the thesis that most of our concepts are innate, an argument that echoes a Chomskyan poverty of the stimulus argument. This argument has a significance over and above what it tells us about Wittgenstein’s implicit commitments. For, it puts considerable pressure on widely held contemporary views of concept learning, such as the view that we learn concepts by constructing (...)
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  • A Meeting of the Conceptual and the Natural: Wittgenstein on Learning a Sensation‐Language.Hao Tang - 2015 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 91 (1):105-135.
    Since the rise of modern natural science there has been deep tension between the conceptual and the natural. Wittgenstein's discussion of how we learn a sensation-language contains important resources that can help us relieve this tension. The key here, I propose, is to focus our attention on animal nature, conceived as partially re-enchanted. To see how nature, so conceived, helps us relieve the tension in question, it is crucial to gain a firm and detailed appreciation of how the primitive-instinctive, a (...)
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  • Seeing and Seeing-AS.B. R. Tilghman - 1988 - AI and Society 2 (4):303-313.
    This paper highlights the importance of inter-relationships between language, context, practice and interpretation. These inter-relationships should be of interest to AI researchers working in multi-disciplinary fields such as knowledge based systems, speech and vision. Attention is drawn to the importance of Part II, Section II of Wittgenstein'sPhilosophical Investigations for understanding the enormous complexity of the concept of seeing and how it is woven into an understanding of language and of human relations.
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