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  1. Wittgenstein on the Gulf Between Believers and Non-Believers.Paolo Tripodi - 2013 - Philosophia 41 (1):63-79.
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  • Religie, fragmentering en rationaliteit.André Cloots - 1999 - Bijdragen 60 (1):3-24.
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  • Conservatism and Common-Sense Realism.Kristóf Nyíri - 2016 - The Monist 99 (4):441-456.
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  • Freedom and Fatalism in Wittgenstein's “Lectures on Freedom of the Will”.Alexander David Carter - unknown
    This thesis seeks to demonstrate the continuing relevance of Wittgenstein’s approach to the problem of freedom of the will, primarily as expounded in his “Lectures on Freedom of the Will”. My overall aim is to show how Wittgenstein works to reconfigure the debates about freedom of the will so that it can be confronted as the kind of problem he thinks it ultimately is: an ethical and existential problem. Not published until 1989, the LFW have received scant critical attention. I (...)
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  • After Religion?: Reflections on Nielsen’s Wittgenstein.Béla Szabados - 2004 - Dialogue 43 (4):747-770.
  • Projective Geometry in Logical Space: Rethinking Tractarian Thoughts.Pablo Acuña - 2018 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 26 (1):1-23.
    Customary interpretations state that Tractarian thoughts are pictures, and, a fortiori, facts. I argue that important difficulties are unavoidable if we assume this standard view, and I propose a reading of the concept taking advantage of an analogy that Wittgenstein introduces, namely, the analogy between thoughts and projective geometry. I claim that thoughts should be understood neither as pictures nor as facts, but as acts of geometric projection in logical space. The interpretation I propose thus removes the root of the (...)
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  • Dōgen and Wittgenstein: Transcending Language Through Ethical Practice.Laura Specker Sullivan - 2013 - Asian Philosophy 23 (3):1-15.
    While there have been numerous claims of a resemblance between the philosophy of Ludwig Wittgenstein and Zen Buddhism, few studies of the philosophy of Wittgenstein in detailed comparison with specific Zen thinkers have emerged. This paper attempts to fill this gap by considering Wittgenstein’s philosophy in relation to that of Eihei Dōgen, founder of the Sōtō school of Zen. Points of particular confluence are found in both thinkers’ approaches to language, experience, and practice. Through an elucidation of these points, this (...)
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  • Religion, Relativism, and Wittgenstein’s Naturalism.Bob Plant - 2011 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 19 (2):177 - 209.
    Abstract Wittgenstein?s remarks on religious and magical practices are often thought to harbour troubling fideistic and relativistic views. Unsurprisingly, commentators are generally resistant to the idea that religious belief constitutes a ?language?game? governed by its own peculiar ?rules?, and is thereby insulated from the critical assessment of non?participants. Indeed, on this fideist?relativist reading, it is unclear how mutual understanding between believers and non?believers (even between different sorts of believers) would be possible. In this paper I do three things: (i) show (...)
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  • Toleration, Multiculturalism and Mistaken Belief.Paul Standish - 2006 - Ethics and Education 1 (1):79-100.
    Doubts have been expressed about the virtue of toleration, especially in view of what some have seen as its complicity with a morality of anything goes. More rigorous arguments have been provided by Peter Gardner and Harvey Siegel against the relativism evident in certain versions of multiculturalism and in the new religious studies. This article examines their arguments. While it recognises the cogency of these arguments, it suggests that their concentration on matters of belief and mistaken belief is apt to (...)
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  • Imaginary Naturalism: The Natural and Primitive in Wittgenstein’s Later Thought.Keith Dromm - 2003 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (4):673 – 690.
  • The Epistemological Argument Against Socialism: A Wittgensteinian Critique of Hayek and Giddens.Nigel Pleasants - 1997 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 40 (1):23 – 45.
    Hayek's and Mises's argument for the impossibility of socialist planning is once again popular. Their case against socialism is predicated on an account of the nature of knowledge and social interaction. Hayek refined Mises's original argument by developing a philosophical anthropology which depicts individuals as tacitly knowledgeable rule-followers embedded in a 'spontaneous order' of systems of rules. Giddens, whose social theory is informed by his reading of Wittgenstein, has recently added his sociological support to Hayek's 'epistemological argument' against socialism. With (...)
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  • Belief or 'Belief': Rush Rhees on Religious Belief Language.Todd R. Long - unknown
    The recent book Rush Rhees on Religion and Philosophy contains a stimulating collection of writin~s by Rush Rhees on a variety of topics in the philosophy of religion. Comprising accounts of personal, religious and moral struggles, these essays provide a refreshing change from the often dry, overly technical approach to philosophy writing. Despite spanning more than thirty years, Rhees' s essays disclose a fairly consistent philosophy.of religion with a clear emphasis. Since he was Wittgenstein's student and long-time friend as well (...)
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  • Wittgenstein's Anti-Scientistic Worldview.Jonathan Beale - 2017 - In Jonathan Beale & Ian James Kidd (eds.), Wittgenstein and Scientism. London: Routledge. pp. 59-80.
    This chapter outlines ways in which Wittgenstein’s opposition to scientism is manifest in his later conception of philosophy and the negative attitude he held toward his times. The chapter tries to make clear how these two areas of Wittgenstein’s thought are connected and reflect an anti-scientistic worldview he held, one intimated in Philosophical Investigations §122. -/- It is argued that the later Wittgenstein’s metaphilosophy is marked out against two scientistic claims in particular. First, the view that the scientific method is (...)
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  • Wittgenstein on Meaning and Life.David Kishik - 2008 - Philosophia 36 (1):111-128.
    This is a paper about the way language meshes with life. It focuses on Ludwig Wittgenstein’s later work, and compares it with Leo Tolstoy and Saint Augustine’s confessions. My aim is to better understand in this way what it means to have meaning in language, as well as meaning in life.
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  • The Wretchedness of Belief: Wittgenstein on Guilt, Religion, and Recompense.Bob Plant - 2004 - Journal of Religious Ethics 32 (3):449 - 476.
    In "Culture and Value" Wittgenstein remarks that the truly "religious man" thinks himself to be, not merely "imperfect" or "ill," but wholly "wretched." While such sentiments are of obvious biographical interest, in this paper I show why they are also worthy of serious philosophical attention. Although the influence of Wittgenstein's thinking on the philosophy of religion is often judged negatively (as, for example, leading to quietist and/or fideist-relativist conclusions) I argue that the distinctly ethical conception of religion (specifically Christianity) that (...)
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  • Reviews & Discussions.Winifred Wing Han Lamb, Stan van Hooft, Patrick Hutchings, Marcel Sarot & Marion Maddox - 1996 - Sophia 35 (2):99-118.
  • Educating Ethically: Culture, Commitment and Integrity.Paul Smeyers - 1996 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 15 (1-2):147-157.
  • The Supernatural as Language Game.Terrance W. Klein - 2006 - Zygon 41 (2):365-380.
  • Religie, Fragmentering En Rationaliteit.André Cloots - 1999 - Bijdragen 60 (1):3-24.
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  • Living in a Wittgensteinian World: Beyond Theory to a Poetics of Practices.John Shotter - 1996 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 26 (3):293–311.
    As human beings, we share many historically developed, language-game interwoven, public forms of life. Due to the joint, dialogically responsive nature of all social life within such forms, we cannot as individuals just act as we please; our forms of life exert a normative influence on what we can say and do. They act as a backdrop against which all our claims to knowledge are judged as acceptable or not. As a result, it is not easy to articulate their inadequacies (...)
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  • A Meeting of the Conceptual and the Natural: Wittgenstein on Learning a Sensation‐Language.Hao Tang - 2015 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 91 (1):105-135.
    Since the rise of modern natural science there has been deep tension between the conceptual and the natural. Wittgenstein's discussion of how we learn a sensation-language contains important resources that can help us relieve this tension. The key here, I propose, is to focus our attention on animal nature, conceived as partially re-enchanted. To see how nature, so conceived, helps us relieve the tension in question, it is crucial to gain a firm and detailed appreciation of how the primitive-instinctive, a (...)
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  • Discourse and the Possibility of Religious Truth.William Sweet - 1998 - Sophia 37 (1):72-102.