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  1. Reciprocity and the Guaranteed Income.Karl Widerquist - 1999 - Politics and Society 27 (3):387-402.
    This paper argues that a guaranteed income is not only consistent with the principle of reciprocity but is required for reciprocity. This conclusion follows from a three-part argument. First, if a guaranteed income is in place, all individuals have the same opportunity to live without working. Therefore, those who choose not to work do not take advantage of a privilege that is unavailable to everyone else. Second, in the absence of an unconditional income, society is, in effect, applying the principle, (...)
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  • Free-Splitting Revisited: Concealing Surplus Value in the Temporary Employment Relationship.George Gonos - 2001 - Politics and Society 29 (4):589-611.
    Based on a historical study of fee regulation in the employment agency business, the claim that temporary help agencies charge “no fees” to workers is challenged. It is found that the claim rests on technical changes in the statutory definitions of fee and employment agency won through industry lobbying efforts, changes that simply mask traditional fee-charging methods. The article traces the evolution of fee-charging practices in the post-World War II period and points to a new version of “fee splitting” as (...)
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  • Swimming Against the Current: The Rise of a Hidden Developmental State in the United States.Fred Block - 2008 - Politics and Society 36 (2):169-206.
    Despite the dominant role of market fundamentalist ideas in U.S. politics over the last thirty years, the Federal government has dramatically expanded its capacity to finance and support efforts of the private sector to commercialize new technologies. But the partisan logic of U.S. politics has worked to make these efforts invisible to mainstream public debate. The consequence is that while this “hidden developmental state” has had a major impact on the structure of the U.S. national innovation system, its ability to (...)
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