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  1. State-Dependent Thinking: A Comparison of Waking and Dreaming Thought.David Kahn & J. Allan Hobson - 2005 - Consciousness and Cognition 14 (3):429-438.
    Thinking is known to be state dependent but a systematic study of how thinking in dreams differs from thinking while awake has not been done. The study consisted of analyzing the dream reports of 26 subjects who, in addition to providing dream reports also provided answers to questions about their thinking within the dream. Our hypothesis was that thinking in dreams is not monolithic but has two distinct components, one that is similar to wake-state cognition, and another that is fundamentally (...)
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  • Human Cognition During REM Sleep and the Activity Profile Within Frontal and Parietal Cortices: A Reappraisal of Functional Neuroimaging Data.Thanh Dang-Vu & Martin Desseilles - unknown
    In this chapter, we aimed at further characterizing the functional neuroanatomy of the human rapid eye movement (REM) sleep at the population level. We carried out a meta-analysis of a large dataset of positron emission tomography (PET) scans acquired during wakefulness, slow wave sleep and REM sleep, and focused especially on the brain areas in which the activity diminishes during REM sleep. Results show that quiescent regions are confined to the inferior and middle frontal cortex and to the inferior parietal (...)
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  • Episodic Thought Distinguishes Spontaneous Cognition in Waking From REM and NREM Sleep.Benjamin Baird, Mariel Kalkach Aparicio, Tariq Alauddin, Brady Riedner, Melanie Boly & Giulio Tononi - 2022 - Consciousness and Cognition 97:103247.
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  • Memory Consolidation During Sleep: On the Function of Neuronal Oscillations in Brain Plasticity.Til Ole Bergmann - 2010 - Dissertation, Christian-Albrechts-Universität Zu Kiel
    Why do we sleep? Loosing consciousness makes us completely vulnerable to any dangers of the environment for a third of our life time and must therefore yield a critical evolutionary advantage. A likely core function of sleep is the regulation of neuronal plasticity. The absence of interfering conscious information processing sets the stage for the basic maintenance of synaptic homeostasis to the complex reorganization and consolidation of memories. However, the underlying neuronal mechanisms subserving these processes are still largely unknown. The (...)
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  • Spacing Repetitions Over Long Timescales: A Review and a Reconsolidation Explanation.Christopher D. Smith & Damian Scarf - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  • Deconstructing Procedural Memory: Different Learning Trajectories and Consolidation of Sequence and Statistical Learning.Peter Simor, Zsofia Zavecz, Kata Horváth, Noémi Éltető, Csenge Török, Orsolya Pesthy, Ferenc Gombos, Karolina Janacsek & Dezso Nemeth - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • The “Instinct” of Imagination. A Neuro-Ethological Approach to the Evolution of the Reflective Mind and Its Application to Psychotherapy.Antonio Alcaro & Stefano Carta - 2019 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12.
  • Where is the Classic Interference Theory for Sleep and Memory?Anton Coenen - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (1):67-68.
    Walker's target article proposes a refinement of the well known two-stage model of memory formation to explain the positive effects of sleep on consolidation. After a first stage in which a labile memory representation is formed, a further stabilisation of the memory trace takes place in the second stage, which is dependent on (REM) sleep. Walker has refined the latter stage into a stage in which a consolidation-based enhancement occurs. It is not completely clear what consolidation-based enhancement implies and how (...)
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  • A Refined Model of Sleep and the Time Course of Memory Formation.Matthew P. Walker - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (1):51-64.
    Research in the neurosciences continues to provide evidence that sleep plays a role in the processes of learning and memory. There is less of a consensus, however, regarding the precise stages of memory development during which sleep is considered a requirement, simply favorable, or not important. This article begins with an overview of recent studies regarding sleep and learning, predominantly in the procedural memory domain, and is measured against our current understanding of the mechanisms that govern memory formation. Based on (...)
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  • Cognitive and Emotional Processes During Dreaming: A Neuroimaging View.Martin Desseilles, Thien Thanh Dang-Vu, Virginie Sterpenich & Sophie Schwartz - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):998-1008.
    Dream is a state of consciousness characterized by internally-generated sensory, cognitive and emotional experiences occurring during sleep. Dream reports tend to be particularly abundant, with complex, emotional, and perceptually vivid experiences after awakenings from rapid eye movement sleep. This is why our current knowledge of the cerebral correlates of dreaming, mainly derives from studies of REM sleep. Neuroimaging results show that REM sleep is characterized by a specific pattern of regional brain activity. We demonstrate that this heterogeneous distribution of brain (...)
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  • Dreaming and the Brain: From Phenomenology to Neurophysiology.Yuval Nir & Giulio Tononi - 2010 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (2):88-100.
    Dreams are a remarkable experiment in psychology and neuroscience, conducted every night in every sleeping person. They show that the human brain, disconnected from the environment, can generate an entire world of conscious experiences by itself. Content analysis and developmental studies have promoted understanding of dream phenomenology. In parallel, brain lesion studies, functional imaging and neurophysiology have advanced current knowledge of the neural basis of dreaming. It is now possible to start integrating these two strands of research to address fundamental (...)
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  • Sleep Imaging and the Neuro-Psychological Assessment of Dreams.Sophie Schwartz & Pierre Maquet - 2002 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (1):23-30.
  • Overlapping Memory Replay During Sleep Builds Cognitive Schemata.Penelope A. Lewis & Simon J. Durrant - 2011 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (8):343-351.
    Sleep enhances integration across multiple stimuli, abstraction of general rules, insight into hidden solutions and false memory formation. Newly learned information is better assimilated if compatible with an existing cognitive framework or schema. This article proposes a mechanism by which the reactivation of newly learned memories during sleep could actively underpin both schema formation and the addition of new knowledge to existing schemata. Under this model, the overlapping replay of related memories selectively strengthens shared elements. Repeated reactivation of memories in (...)
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  • Are Life Episodes Replayed During Dreaming?Sophie Schwartz - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (8):325-327.
  • The Contribution of Sleep to Hippocampus-Dependent Memory Consolidation.Lisa Marshall & Jan Born - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (10):442-450.
  • Upgrading the Sleeping Brain with Targeted Memory Reactivation.Delphine Oudiette & Ken A. Paller - 2013 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 17 (3):142-149.
  • Dreaming Without REM Sleep.Delphine Oudiette, Marie-José Dealberto, Ginevra Uguccioni, Jean-Louis Golmard, Milagros Merino-Andreu, Mehdi Tafti, Lucile Garma, Sophie Schwartz & Isabelle Arnulf - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (3):1129-1140.
    To test whether mental activities collected from non-REM sleep are influenced by REM sleep, we suppressed REM sleep using clomipramine 50 mg or placebo in the evening, in a double blind cross-over design, in 11 healthy young men. Subjects were awakened every hour and asked about their mental activity. The marked REM-sleep suppression induced by clomipramine did not substantially affect any aspects of dream recall . Since long, complex and bizarre dreams persist even after suppressing REM sleep either partially or (...)
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  • The Neural Substrate for Dreaming: Is It a Subsystem of the Default Network?G. William Domhoff - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1163-1174.
    Building on the content, developmental, and neurological evidence that there are numerous parallels between waking cognition and dreaming, this article argues that the likely neural substrate that supports dreaming, which was discovered through converging lesion and neuroimaging studies, may be a subsystem of the waking default network, which is active during mind wandering, daydreaming, and simulation. Support for this hypothesis would strengthen the case for a more general neurocognitive theory of dreaming that starts with established findings and concepts derived from (...)
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