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  1. Epistemology Contextualized: Social-Scientific Knowledge in a Postpositivist Era.Isaac Ariail Reed - 2010 - Sociological Theory 28 (1):20-39.
    In the production of knowledge about social life, two social contexts come together: the context of investigation, consisting of the social world of the investigator, and the context of explanation, consisting of the social world of the actors who are the subject of study. The nature of, and relationship between, these contexts is imagined in philosophy; managed, rewarded, and sanctioned in graduate seminars, journal reviews, and tenure cases; and practiced in research. Positivism proposed to produce objective knowledge by suppressing the (...)
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  • Personhood and Time: Technologies of Assessment, Ambiguous Identities and Giving People a Future.Joanna Elizabeth Latimer - 2008 - Cardiff University.
    The paper discusses the relation between technology, time and identity. Drawing on ethnographies of older people in hospital the paper focuses on the making and unmaking of ageing identities in the context of new technologies of assessment. The paper examines how people's histories and futures are mobilised in the making and unmaking of them as persons in medical settings. But this is not to suggest that the relation between time and identity is ever settled: on the contrary the discursive constitution (...)
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  • Misrepresentation of Marginalized Groups: A Critique of Epistemic Neocolonialism.Rashedur Chowdhury - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-18.
    I argue that meta-ignorance and meta-insensitivity are the key sources influencing the reoccurrence of the (un)conscious misrepresentation of marginalized groups in management and organization research; such misrepresentation, in effect, perpetuates epistemic neocolonialism. Meta-ignorance describes incorrect epistemic attitudes, which render researchers ignorant about issues such as contextual history and emotional and political aspects of a social problem. Researcher meta-ignorance can be a permanent feature, given how researchers define, locate, and make use of their epistemic positionality and privilege. In contrast, meta-insensitivity is (...)
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  • Promoting Ethical Reflection in the Teaching of Social Entrepreneurship: A Proposal Using Religious Parables.Nuria Toledano - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 164 (1):115-132.
    This paper proposes a teaching alternative that can encourage the ethical reflective sensibility among students of social entrepreneurship. It does so by exploring the possibility of using religious parables as narratives that can be analysed from Ricoeur’s hermeneutics to provoke and encourage ethical discussions in social entrepreneurship courses. To illustrate this argument, the paper makes use of a parable from the New Testament as an example of a religious narrative that can be used to prompt discussions about social entrepreneurs’ ethical (...)
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  • “We are fed up …Being research objects!” negotiating identities and solidarities in militant ethnography.Magdalena Sztandara - 2021 - Human Affairs 31 (3):262-275.
    This article describes experiences of long-term ethnographic fieldwork on disobedience, disloyalty and dissensus among women in public space in selected Yugoslav cities. I focus on the opportunities and pitfalls of feminist ethnography and methodology in the context of positionality, engagement and solidarity as essential elements of research into activist networks. In order to problematize the emerging field positionalities and solidarities, I examine the “militant ethnography” methodological approach, which seeks to move beyond the divide between research practice and politically engaged participation. (...)
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  • Medical Anthropolgy: A New Field of Research in Slovakia.Tatiana Bužeková - 2015 - Human Affairs 25 (3):276-287.
    The paper offers a brief review of ethnological studies conducted in Slovakia in relation to the main theoretical directions in medical anthropology. This sub-discipline of social/cultural anthropology has not yet been established in Slovakia owing to local scientific traditions. The author covers ethnographic studies conducted in Slovakia that might be considered relevant to this field and places them in the context of developments in anthropology in central and eastern Europe. Ethnological work and empirical findings obtained in related social disciplines may (...)
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  • Feminist anthropology?Lynn Walter - 1995 - Gender and Society 9 (3):272-288.
    In this article, the author argues that feminist anthropology as a field of study should pose questions about how differential power is constituted as gender differences. Addressing these questions calls for an approach to the study of gender and power that articulates the relationship between structure and agency. Such an approach is one that analyzes the practice of gender over time from intersubjective, political perspectives. Last, the author argues that feminist anthropology is a justice claim, which demands an ethic of (...)
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  • Inspiring action, building understanding: how cross-sector partnership engages business in addressing global challenges.Helen Wadham & Richard Warren - 2013 - Business Ethics: A European Review 22 (1):47-63.
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  • Inspiring action, building understanding: how cross-sector partnership engages business in addressing global challenges.Helen Wadham & Richard Warren - 2013 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 22 (1):47-63.
    Existing research highlights the role of partnerships between business and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) in addressing poverty, climate change, disease and other challenges. But less is known about how such partnerships may also challenge our very understanding of the nature of those problems. This paper draws on Habermas' theoretical ideas about communicative action and deliberative democracy, applying them to an ethnographic study of Concern Universal, an international NGO with a particular focus on working collaboratively with business. The focus of the study (...)
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  • Globalizing the Rainbow Madonna.Manuel A. Vásquez & Marie F. Marquardt - 2000 - Theory, Culture and Society 17 (4):119-143.
    This article examines the dynamics that have turned a recent Marian apparition on the window of a bank in Clearwater, Florida, from a local into a global phenomenon. Drawing from theories of globalization, we show how the apparition exemplifies what sociologist Roland Robertson refers to as the mutually implicative `universalization of particularism and the particularization of universalism'. Among the factors analyzed are global pilgrimage, transnational migration, mediascapes and the Vatican's New Evangelization initiative. On the basis of this case study, the (...)
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  • Local knowledge and comparative scientific traditions.David Turnbull - 1993 - Knowledge, Technology & Policy 6 (3-4):29-54.
  • Anthropological and sociological critiques of bioethics.Leigh Turner - 2009 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (1):83-98.
    Anthropologists and sociologists offer numerous critiques of bioethics. Social scientists criticize bioethicists for their arm-chair philosophizing and socially ungrounded pontificating, offering philosophical abstractions in response to particular instances of suffering, making all-encompassing universalistic claims that fail to acknowledge cultural differences, fostering individualism and neglecting the importance of families and communities, and insinuating themselves within the “belly” of biomedicine. Although numerous aspects of bioethics warrant critique and reform, all too frequently social scientists offer ungrounded, exaggerated criticisms of bioethics. Anthropological and sociological (...)
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  • `The Sixties' Trope.Eleanor Townsley - 2001 - Theory, Culture and Society 18 (6):99-123.
    Combining insights from narrative analysis in sociology and trope theory in anthropology, this article develops a theory of tropes that emphasizes their historical production and political effects. Tropes function politically to enable some narratives, identities and resolutions while foreclosing others. As a powerful tool for socio-historical analysis, a consideration of tropes is crucial for deconstructing the taken-for-granted predicates and the `dangerous' consequences of political narratives. To illustrate the argument, the trope of `the Sixties' is analyzed as a case study.
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  • “Webs of Engagement”: Managerial Responsibility in a Japanese Company. [REVIEW]Maya Morioka Todeschini - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (S1):45-59.
    Drawing on the author’s professional experience working inside a Japanese company, the essay examines the cultural construction of managerial responsibility in Japan, and explores the tensions between Eastern and Western notions of responsibility in the Japanese workplace. The author proposes two idioms that shape local notions of responsibility as “webs of engagement.” Based on the Japanese concepts ba and kokoro , these idioms suggest significant departures from Western notions of workplace corporate social responsibility. Since much of the literature on CSR (...)
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  • On Inaccessibility and Vulnerability: Some Horizons of Compatibility between Phenomenology and Psychoanalysis.C. Jason Throop - 2012 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 40 (1):75-96.
  • Ethnographic authority and the construction of alterity in Henry Adams's relations of his south seas travels.Wolfgang Suppan & Utz Rlese - 1997 - The European Legacy 2 (1):34-39.
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  • Let us then Return to the Murmuring of Everyday Practices: A Note on Michel de Certeau, Television and Everyday Life.Roger Silverstone - 1989 - Theory, Culture and Society 6 (1):77-94.
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  • The Ethnographer’s Apprentice: Trying Consumer Culture from the Outside In. [REVIEW]John F. Sherry - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 80 (1):85 - 95.
    Anthropologists have long wrestled with their impact upon the people they study. Historically, the discipline has served and subverted colonial agendas, but views itself traditionally as an advocate for the disempowered and as an instrument of public policy. Marketing is now among the pre-eminent institutions of cultural stability and change at work on the planet. Currently, ethnography is assuming a growing importance in the marketer’s effort to influence the accommodation and resistance of consumers to the neocolonial forces of globalization. The (...)
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  • The Ethnographer’s Apprentice: Trying Consumer Culture from the Outside In.John F. Sherry - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 80 (1):85-95.
    Anthropologists have long wrestled with their impact upon the people they study. Historically, the discipline has served and subverted colonial agendas, but views itself traditionally as an advocate for the disempowered and as an instrument of public policy. Marketing is now among the pre-eminent institutions of cultural stability and change at work on the planet. Currently, ethnography is assuming a growing importance in the marketer's effort to influence the accommodation and resistance of consumers to the neocolonial forces of globalization. The (...)
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  • How the Ethiopian Changed His Skin.D. Selden - 2013 - Classical Antiquity 32 (2):322-377.
    Aksumite elites electively identified themselves as “black” in relation to the paler integument of other Mediterranean peoples. Prior to the fourth century CE, the proper noun Aithiopía referred to the area of northern Sudan. Aksum, however, deliberately appropriated the Greek term for its own geopolitical purposes, partly as a way to write itself both into the grand narratives of Graeco-Roman history, where “Ethiopians” recurrently figure as morally “blameless,” as well as—with their conversion to Christianity—into Old and New Testamental eschatologies that (...)
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  • Incomplete knowledge: ethnography and the crisis of context in studies of media, science and technology.Markus Schlecker & Eric Hirsch - 2001 - History of the Human Sciences 14 (1):69-87.
    This article examines strands of an intellectual history in Media and Cultural Studies and Science and Technology Studies in both of which researchers were prompted to take up ethnography. Three historical phases of this process are identified. The move between phases was the result of particular displacements and contestations of perspective in the research procedures within each discipline. Thus concerns about appropriate contextualization led to the eventual embrace of anthropological ethnographic methods. The article traces the subsequent emergence of a ‘crisis (...)
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  • Hurrah for Empirical Bioethics (Where Hermeneutically Clarified) or How Perception of Facts 'Depends' on Values.Dawson S. Schultz - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (6-7):95-99.
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  • On making a cultural turn in religious ethics.Richard B. Miller - 2005 - Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (3):409-443.
    This essay critically explores resources and reasons for the study of culture in religious ethics, paying special attention to rhetorics and genres that provide an ethics of ordinary life. I begin by exploring a work in cultural anthropology that poses important questions for comparative and cultural inquiry in an age alert to "otherness," asymmetries of power, the end of value-neutrality in the humanities, and the formation of identity. I deepen my argument by making a foundational case for the importance of (...)
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  • Creating order in the bureaucratic register: An analysis of suicide crime scene investigations in southern mexico.Beatriz M. Reyes-Foster - 2014 - Critical Discourse Studies 11 (4):377-396.
    Crime scene investigation reports, like other kids of official bureaucratic documents, serve an important purpose in the functioning of modern states. This article examines crime scene investigation reports from a city in southeastern Mexico pseudonymously called La Ciudad. The article combines textual discourse analysis of police suicide investigation reports with ethnographic analysis of police investigative practices to ask, how do law enforcement documents showcase the interactions between law enforcement agents and citizens? In what way can ethnographic analysis highlight and supplement (...)
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  • The impact of postmodernism on research methodology: implications for nursing.Claire Parsons - 1995 - Nursing Inquiry 2 (1):22-28.
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  • “Unlearning to not speak”.M. A. Paget - 1990 - Human Studies 13 (2):147 - 161.
    We regret to inform our readers that Marianne (Tracy) Paget died of cancer in December 1989. She continued her work virtually until her death. She left a manuscript in which she writes about her own experiences with cancer. The Text from Life, which her colleagues and friends will have published. She was a courageous and remarkable scholar, a life long friend of this journal, and a dedicated phenomenologist. She will be greatly missed. The Editor.
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  • Nonreproductive Technologies: Remediating Kin Structure with Donor Gametes.Robert Nachtigall, Gay Becker & Jennifer Harrington - 2008 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 33 (3):393-418.
    This article examines the absence of biological relatedness in couples where the use of a third-party gamete donor casts doubt on the notion of conventional kinship. The authors observe that individuals who have used technology to create a family remediate relatedness through a dehistoricized idea of kinship in which the traditional concept is replaced with the concept of chance. The article also examines how inherited value is replaced by strategies that redefine the ways in which donor gamete parents can pass (...)
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  • Experiments in Context and Contexting. [REVIEW]Ingunn Moser & Kristin Asdal - 2012 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 37 (4):291-306.
    What is context and how to deal with it? The context issue has been a key concern in Science and Technology Studies. This is linked to the understanding that science is culture. But how? The irreductionist program from the early eighties sought to solve the problem by doing away with context altogether—for the benefit of worlds in the making. This special issue takes its points of departure in this irreductionist program, its source of inspirations, as well as its reworkings. The (...)
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  • Degeneracy at Multiple Levels of Complexity.Paul H. Mason - 2010 - Biological Theory 5 (3):277-288.
    Degeneracy is a poorly understood process, essential to natural selection. In the 18th and 19th centuries, the concept of degeneracy was commandeered by the colonial imagination. A rigid understanding of species, race, and culture grew to dominate the normative thinking that persisted well into the burgeoning new industrial age. A 20th-century reconfiguration of the concept by George Gamow highlighted a form of intraorganismic variation that is still underexplored. Degeneracy exists in a population of variants where structurally different components perform a (...)
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  • The once and future ethnographic archive.George E. Marcus - 1998 - History of the Human Sciences 11 (4):49-63.
    This article is concerned with the literal and metaphoric senses in which anthropology's accumulation of knowledge through the production of ethnography on the world's peoples can be considered an archive. The relevance of this concept to ethnography has a very different past, present, and emergent associations. The Human Area Relations Files project as visionary science dependent on the making of an archive of ethnography contrasts with the uses of the past ethnographic record in the pursuit of contemporary fieldwork in a (...)
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  • The collectible other and inevitable interventions: A textual analysis ofWashington post foreign reporting. [REVIEW]Elli Lester - 1994 - Argumentation 8 (4):345-356.
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  • Organizing context: nurses' assessments of older people in an acute medical unit.Joanna Latimer - 1998 - Nursing Inquiry 5 (1):43-57.
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  • A requiem for the `primitive'.Fuyuki Kurasawa - 2002 - History of the Human Sciences 15 (3):1-24.
    This article argues that the implications of the recent eclipse of the construct of the `primitive' for the practice of the human sciences have not been adequately pondered. It asks, therefore, why and how the myth of primitiveness has been sustained by the human sciences, and what purposes it has served for the modern West's self-understanding. To attempt to answer such a query, the article pursues two principal lines of inquiry. In order to appreciate what is potentially being lost, the (...)
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  • A Mannheim for All Seasons: Bloor, Merton, and the Roots of the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.David Kaiser - 1998 - Science in Context 11 (1):51-87.
    The ArgumentDavid Bloor often wrote that Karl Mannheim had “stopped short” in his sociology of knowledge, lacking the nerve to consider the natural sciences sociologically. While this assessment runs counter to Mannheim's own work, which responded in quite specific ways both to an encroaching “modernity” and a looming fascism, Bloor's depiction becomes clearer when considered in the light of his principal introduction to Mannheim's work — a series of essays by Robert Merton. Bloor's reading and appropriation of Mannheim emerged from (...)
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  • Cross‐cultural understanding: Its philosophical and anthropological problems.Christoph Jamme - 1996 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 4 (2):292 – 308.
    Abstract I wish to discuss the constitutive conditions ? and aporias ? of the representations of the other in philosophy, sociology and cultural studies. In so doing, I show that crucial to the problem of ?tolerance? is the answer to such questions as: How do we represent the stranger and the other? How does this representation come into being? How can it ? in given instances ? be changed? I shall suggest that the arts may play a decisive role in (...)
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  • Writing multi-discursive ethnography as critical discourse study: the case of the Wenchang Palace in Quzhou, China.Song Hou & Zongjie Wu - 2017 - Critical Discourse Studies 14 (1):73-89.
    ABSTRACTThis paper proposes to use ‘multi-discursive ethnography’ to move critical discourse analysis/studies beyond an analytical enterprise so that it may transcend the ‘critical/positive’ dichotomy and the language dilemma researchers confront. As an alternative form of critical discourse study, multi-discursive ethnography seeks to explore different discourses of a subject matter and weave them together for dialogue and diversity. As such, it not only challenges dominant discursive construction of the subject matter at stake, but also endorses corresponding local, cultural ways of speaking (...)
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  • Understanding the Subjective Point of View: Methodological Implications of the Schutz-Parsons Debate.Wing-Chung Ho - 2008 - Human Studies 31 (4):383-397.
    The bone of contention that divides Alfred Schutz and Talcott Parsons in their 1940–1941 debate is that Schutz acknowledges an ontological break between the commonsense and scientific worlds whereas Parsons only considers it “a matter of refinement.” Schutz’s ontological distancing that disconnects the “world of consociates” where social reality is directly experienced in face-to-face contacts, and the “world of contemporaries” where the Other is experienced in terms of “types” has been crucial to social scientists. Implicated in the break is that (...)
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  • Technology as Fetish: Marx, Latour, and the Cultural Foundations of Capitalism.Alf Hornborg - 2014 - Theory, Culture and Society 31 (4):119-140.
    This article discusses how the way in which post-Enlightenment humans tend to relate to material objects is a fundamental aspect of modern capitalism. The difficulties that conventional academic disciplines have in grasping the societal and political aspect of ‘technology’ stem from the predominant Cartesian paradigm that distinguishes the domain of material objects from that of social relations of exchange. This Cartesian paradigm has constrained the Marxian analysis of capital accumulation from extending the concept of fetishism to the domain of technology. (...)
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  • The Commons and the Moral Organization.Edwin M. Hartman - 1994 - Business Ethics Quarterly 4 (3):253-269.
    A complex organization is in effect a commons, which supervisory techniques cannot preserve from free riding. A corporate culture strong enough to create the requisite community-minded second-order desires and beliefs may be morally illegitimate. What morality requires is not local enforcement of foundational moral principles-a futile undertaking-but that the organization be a good community in that it permits the disaffected to exit, encourages reflective consideration of morality and the good life, and creates appropriate loyalty.
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  • Culture and Cultural Analysis.Michael M. J. Fischer - 2006 - Theory, Culture and Society 23 (2-3):360-364.
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  • Methodology, Epistemology, and Empirical Bioethics Research: A Constructive/ist Commentary.Michael Dunn & Jonathan Ives - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (6-7):93-95.
  • Anthropology as Social Epistemology?Marianne de Laet - 2012 - Social Epistemology 26 (3-4):419-433.
    Anthropology?its methodology, its paths to knowing; but also its epistemology, its modes of knowing?saturates the practices of Science and Technology Studies (STS). In a nutshell, anthropology has helped STS find ways to break open the discourses of science. If we were to believe our ?natives??scientists?and accept what they say about what they do and know on their own terms, we would not be able to add anything to these stories. And so in STS, we have modified the anthropological propensity to (...)
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  • Sanskrit scholars and PanditS of the old school: The benares sanskrit college and the constitution of authority in the late nineteenth century. [REVIEW]Vasudha Dalmia - 1996 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 24 (4):321-337.
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  • Qualitative Research in Education: The Origins, Debates, and Politics of Creating Knowledge.Aaron Cooley - 2013 - Educational Studies: A Jrnl of the American Educ. Studies Assoc 49 (3):247-262.
    This article presents an overview and discussion of qualitative research in education by analyzing the roles of researchers, the history of the field, its use in policymaking, and its future influence on educational reform. The article begins by describing the unique position that qualitative educational researchers have in higher education, as they often attempt to serve both academic and policymaking audiences. The article then moves to discuss the ascent of qualitative methods in the social sciences and educational research. The article (...)
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  • Introduction: What is sociosemiotics?Paul Cobley & Anti Randviir - 2009 - Semiotica 2009 (173):1-39.
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  • Relational Complexity and Ethical Responsibility.Diana Fritz Cates - 2019 - Journal of Religious Ethics 47 (1):154-165.
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  • Judgment and critique, anthropology and religion.Jon Bialecki - 2018 - Critical Research on Religion 6 (1):10-15.
    This article attempts to chart the various cross-cutting forms of critique that might surface in an ethnographic investigation of modes of religiosity. It stresses that if ethnography is to be an actual encounter, then it is important to at once understand that critique itself is not limited to merely one form of expression; nor should there be preconceptions as to what subjects are capable of voicing critique. At the same time though, it is equally important to distinguish critique from judgment; (...)
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  • Closing the circle: how Harvey and his contemporaries played the game of truth, part 2.Don Bates - 1998 - History of Science 36 (3):234-267.
  • How to become an iconic social thinker: The intellectual pursuits of Malinowski and Foucault.Dominik Bartmanski - 2012 - European Journal of Social Theory 15 (4):427-453.
    The present article develops a new approach to intellectual history and sociology of knowledge. Its point of departure is to investigate the conditions under which social thinkers assume the iconic reputation. What does it take to become ‘a founding father’ of a humanistic discipline? How do social thinkers achieve the status of a trans-disciplinary star? Why some intellectuals attract tremendous attention and ‘go down in history’ despite personal and professional failures, while others enjoy only limited recognition or simply sink into (...)
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  • Popular Music Studies and the Problems of Sound, Society and Method.Eliot Bates - 2013 - [email protected] 3 (2):15-32.
    Building on Philip Tagg’s timely intervention (2011), I investigate four things in relation to three dominant Anglophone popular music studies journals (Popular Music and Society, Popular Music, and the Journal of Popular Music Studies): 1) what interdisciplinarity or multidisciplinarity means within popular music studies, with a particular focus on the sites of research and the place of ethnographic and/or anthropological approaches; 2) the extent to which popular music studies has developed canonic scholarship, and the citation tendencies present within scholarship on (...)
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