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  1. Needed but Unwanted. Thomas Hobbes’s Warnings on the Dangers of Multitude, Populism and Democracy.Mikko Jakonen - 2016 - Las Torres de Lucca: Revista Internacional de Filosofía Política 5 (9):89-118.
    The purpose of this article is to analyse Hobbes’s understanding of democracy. The first part of the article analyses the role of democracy in the social contract. It aims to show how there exists a democratic element at the beginning of the process of social contract, in which the multitude is transformed into a people. However, after the first social contract is made, Hobbes aims to reduce the power of the people by leading the process of social contract on to (...)
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  • The Surreptitious Leviathan: Concealing the Beast of Scientific Reason.David W. Cheely - 2013 - Lyceum 12 (1).
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  • Leviathan Leashed: The Incoherence of Absolute Sovereign Power.Paul R. DeHart - 2013 - Critical Review 25 (1):1-37.
    Early modern theorists linked the idea of sovereign power to a conception of absolute power developed during the medieval period. Ockham had reframed the already extant distinction between God's absolute and ordained powers in order to argue that God was free of moral constraint in ordaining natural law for human beings. Thus, the natural law could command the opposite of what God had ordained if He wished to make it so. Bodin extended Ockham's argument to earthly sovereigns, who do not (...)
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  • No Letters: Hobbes and 20th-Century Philosophy of Language.W. P. Grundy - 2008 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 38 (4):486-512.
    The author argues that Thomas Hobbes anticipates a set of questions about meaning and semantic order that come to fuller expression in the 20th century, in the writings of W.V.O. Quine, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Donald Davidson, Jacques Derrida, and Richard Rorty. Despite their different points of departure, these 20th-century writers pose a number of profound questions about the conditions for the stability of meaning, and about the conditions that govern the use of the term “language” itself. Though the more recent debate (...)
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