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  1. Eine Grüblerische Argutation? Kant Und Hegel Zum Sein Als Position.Hector Ferreiro - 2016 - In Georgi Donev, Silviya Kristeva, Atanaska Cholakova & Reinhard Hesse (eds.), Back to Metaphysics. Blagoevgrad: University Press “Neofit Rilski”. pp. 259-277.
    Kant claims that existence is not a real predicate that can be added to the concept of a thing, but that it is the mere positing of the thing. Kant considers this thesis to be evident for itself and therefore thinks that its rejection is the result of an " over-subtle argumentation ". In this paper I will show that the claim that existence is the positing of the content of mental concepts, far from being evident, rests on numerous philosophical (...)
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  • Siete ensayos sobre la muerte de la metafísica: Una introducción al idealismo absoluto a partir de la ontología.Hector Ferreiro - 2016 - Porto Alegre: Editora FI.
  • Preliminary to Concept of the Ontology in Kant’s Critical Philosophy.Vitali Terletsky - 2013 - Sententiae 28 (1):30-41.
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  • Anselm of Canterbury and Dionysius the Areopagite's Reflections on the Incomprehensibility of God.Gabriel D. Andrus - 2016 - Heythrop Journal 57 (2):269-281.
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  • Traces of Reduction: Marion and Heidegger on the Phenomenon of Religion.Brian Rogers - 2014 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 52 (2):184-205.
    In his work, Being Given, Jean-Luc Marion calls for a phenomenological investigation of the givenness (donation) of the phenomenon. As a phenomenologist of religion, Marion aims to give a philosophical account of the possibility of revelation, something which by definition is unconditionally given. In Being Given, he contends that his phenomenological reduction to unconditional givenness (in the figure of the saturated phenomenon) can account for religious phenomena in a way that respects the subject matter, all the while remaining philosophically neutral. (...)
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