Switch to: References

Citations of:

On Representing True-in-L'in L Robert L. Martin and Peter W. Woodruff

In Recent Essays on Truth and the Liar Paradox. Oxford University Press. pp. 47 (1984)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Axiomatizing Kripke's Theory of Truth.Volker Halbach & Leon Horsten - 2006 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 71 (2):677 - 712.
    We investigate axiomatizations of Kripke's theory of truth based on the Strong Kleene evaluation scheme for treating sentences lacking a truth value. Feferman's axiomatization KF formulated in classical logic is an indirect approach, because it is not sound with respect to Kripke's semantics in the straightforward sense: only the sentences that can be proved to be true in KF are valid in Kripke's partial models. Reinhardt proposed to focus just on the sentences that can be proved to be true in (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   47 citations  
  • Unshadowed Thought: Representations in Thought and Language.Reinaldo Elugardo & Robert J. Stainton - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (3):470-473.
    This is a very poorly written book. It is highly repetitive and verbose. Moreover, despite the repetition, it is fundamentally unclear—both because of unhelpful and unexplained terminology, and because of its distinctively tangled prose. Here is one example of the latter.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  • Circularity, Definition and Truth.Michael Glanzberg - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (3):465-470.
    This is a collection of eighteen solicited papers on the topics of the title: circularity, definition, and truth. The papers are loosely connected in subject matter, but present a great variety of issues, theories, and approaches. Amongst the many subjects discussed are: the revision theory of truth and applications of revision rules, partiality and fixed point constructions, substitutional quantification, fuzzy logic, negation, belief revision, context dependence, hierarchies, Tarski on truth, deflationism, correspondence theories of truth, and normative aspects of truth. The (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Subtracting “Ought” From “Is”: Descriptivism Versus Normativism in the Study of Human Thinking.Shira Elqayam & Jonathan St B. T. Evans - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (5):233-248.
    We propose a critique ofnormativism, defined as the idea that human thinking reflects a normative system against which it should be measured and judged. We analyze the methodological problems associated with normativism, proposing that it invites the controversial “is-ought” inference, much contested in the philosophical literature. This problem is triggered when there are competing normative accounts, as empirical evidence can help arbitrate between descriptive theories, but not between normative systems. Drawing on linguistics as a model, we propose that a clear (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   42 citations  
  • Commentary/Elqayam & Evans: Subtracting “Ought” From “Is”.Natalie Gold, Andrew M. Colman & Briony D. Pulford - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (5).
    Normative theories can be useful in developing descriptive theories, as when normative subjective expected utility theory is used to develop descriptive rational choice theory and behavioral game theory. “Ought” questions are also the essence of theories of moral reasoning, a domain of higher mental processing that could not survive without normative considerations.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • A Comparative Taxonomy of Medieval and Modern Approaches to Liar Sentences.C. Dutilh Novaes - 2008 - History and Philosophy of Logic 29 (3):227-261.
    Two periods in the history of logic and philosophy are characterized notably by vivid interest in self-referential paradoxical sentences in general, and Liar sentences in particular: the later medieval period (roughly from the 12th to the 15th century) and the last 100 years. In this paper, I undertake a comparative taxonomy of these two traditions. I outline and discuss eight main approaches to Liar sentences in the medieval tradition, and compare them to the most influential modern approaches to such sentences. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Inconsistent Languages.Matti Eklund - 2002 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 64 (2):251-275.
    The main thesis of this paper is that we sometimes are disposed to accept false and even jointly inconsistent claims by virtue of our semantic competence, and that this comes to light in the sorites and liar paradoxes. Among the subsidiary theses are that this is an important source of indeterminacy in truth conditions, that we must revise basic assumptions about semantic competence, and that classical logic and bivalence can be upheld in the face of the sorites paradox.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   55 citations  
  • New Grounds for Naive Truth Theory.Stephen Yablo - 2004 - In J. C. Beall (ed.), Liars and Heaps: New Essays on Paradox. Clarendon Press. pp. 312-330.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Property Theory: The Type-Free Approach V. The Church Approach.George Bealer - 1994 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 23 (2):139 - 171.
    In a lengthy review article, C. Anthony Anderson criticizes the approach to property theory developed in Quality and Concept (1982). That approach is first-order, type-free, and broadly Russellian. Anderson favors Alonzo Church’s higher-order, type-theoretic, broadly Fregean approach. His worries concern the way in which the theory of intensional entities is developed. It is shown that the worries can be handled within the approach developed in the book but they remain serious obstacles for the Church approach. The discussion focuses on: (1) (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Physics of Brain-Mind Interaction.John C. Eccles - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):662-663.
  • A Justification for Popper's Non-Justificationism.Chi-Ming Lam - 2007 - Diametros 12:1-24.
    Using the somewhat simple thesis that we can learn from our mistakes despite our fallibility as a basis, Karl Popper developed a non-justificationist epistemology in which knowledge grows through criticizing rather than justifying our theories. However, there is much controversy among philosophers over the validity and feasibility of his non-justificationism. In this paper, I first consider the problem of the bounds of reason which, arising from justificationism, disputes Popper’s non-justificationist epistemology. Then, after examining in turn three views of rationality that (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Circularity and Paradox.Stephen Yablo - 2006 - In Thomas Bolander, Vincent F. Hendricks & Stig Andur Pedersen (eds.), Self-Reference. CSLI Publications. pp. 139--157.
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   30 citations  
  • Lp+, K3+, Fde+, and Their 'Classical Collapse'.Jc Beall - 2013 - Review of Symbolic Logic 6 (4):742-754.
    This paper is a sequel to Beall (2011), in which I both give and discuss the philosophical import of a result for the propositional (multiple-conclusion) logic LP+. Feedback on such ideas prompted a spelling out of the first-order case. My aim in this paper is to do just that: namely, explicitly record the first-order result(s), including the collapse results for K3+ and FDE+.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • Is Mathematical Insight Algorithmic?Martin Davis - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):659-660.
  • Hypatia's Silence.Martin Fischer, Leon Horsten & Carlo Nicolai - forthcoming - Noûs.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Simple Liar Without Bivalence?Jc Beall & OtÁvio Bueno - 2002 - Analysis 62 (1):22-26.
  • The Liar Paradox as a Reductio Ad Absurdum Argument.Menashe Schwed - unknown
    This presentation traces an historical root of the reductio ad absurdum mode of argumentation in Greek philosophy. I propose a new understanding of the liar paradox as an instance of this mode of argumentation. I show that the paradox was crea ted as part of a refutational argument in the controversy over the justification of realism and the realists concepts of truth and certainty. The paradox was part of the dialectical style of Greek scepticism, which was characterized, inter alia, by (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Quantification and Realism.Michael Glanzberg - 2004 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 69 (3):541-572.
    This paper argues for the thesis that, roughly put, it is impossible to talk about absolutely everything. To put the thesis more precisely, there is a particular sense in which, as a matter of semantics, quantifiers always range over domains that are in principle extensible, and so cannot count as really being ‘absolutely everything’. The paper presents an argument for this thesis, and considers some important objections to the argument and to the formulation of the thesis. The paper also offers (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • The Nonalgorithmic Mind.Roger Penrose - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):692-705.
  • Computability, Consciousness, and Algorithms.Robert Wilensky - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):690-691.
  • Minds Beyond Brains and Algorithms.Jan M. Zytkow - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):691-692.
  • Penrose's Grand Unified Mystery.David Waltz & James Pustejovsky - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):688-690.
  • Exactly Which Emperor is Penrose Talking About?John K. Tsotsos - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):686-687.
  • Between Turing and Quantum Mechanics There is Body to Be Found.Francisco J. Varela - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):687-688.
  • The Thinker Dreams of Being an Emperor.M. M. Taylor - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):685-686.
  • The Pretender's New Clothes.Tim Smithers - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):683-684.
  • And Then a Miracle Happens….Keith E. Stanovich - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):684-685.
  • Seeing Truth or Just Seeming True?Adina Roskies - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):682-683.
  • The Emperor's Old Hat.Don Perlis - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):680-681.
  • Systematic, Unconscious Thought is the Place to Anchor Quantum Mechanics in the Mind.Thomas Roeper - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):681-682.
  • Steadfast Intentions.Keith K. Niall - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):679-680.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Computation and Consciousness.Drew McDermott - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):676-678.
  • The Powers of Machines and Minds.Chris Mortensen - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):678-679.
  • Uncertainty About Quantum Mechanics.Mark S. Madsen - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):674-675.
  • Gödel redux.Alexis Manaster-Ramer, Walter J. Savitch & Wlodek Zadrozny - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):675-676.
    Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Discomforts of Dualism.Bruce MacLennan - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):673-674.
  • Time-Delays in Conscious Processes.Benjamin Libet - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):672-672.
  • Quantum AI.Rudi Lutz - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):672-673.
  • A Long Time Ago in a Computing Lab Far, Far Away….Jeffery L. Johnson, R. H. Ettinger & Timothy L. Hubbard - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):670-670.
  • Parallelism and Patterns of Thought.R. W. Kentridge - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):670-671.
  • Selecting for the Con in Consciousness.Deborah Hodgkin & Alasdair I. Houston - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):668-669.
  • Why You'll Never Know Whether Roger Penrose is a Computer.Clark Glymour & Kevin Kelly - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):666-667.
  • Penrose's Platonism.James Higginbotham - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):667-668.
  • Where is the Material of the Emperor's Mind?David L. Gilden & Joseph S. Lappin - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):665-666.
  • Don't Ask Plato About the Emperor's Mind.Alan Gamham - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):664-665.
  • Strong AI and the Problem of “Second-Order” Algorithms.Gerd Gigerenzer - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):663-664.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Computations Over Abstract Categories of Representation.Roy Eagleson - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):661-662.
  • Betting Your Life on an Algorithm.Daniel C. Dennett - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):660-661.
  • Perceptive Questions About Computation and Cognition.Jon Doyle - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):661-661.
  • Lucas Revived? An Undefended Flank.Jeremy Butterfield - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):658-658.