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The Education of John Dewey: A Biography

Cambridge University Press (2002)

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  1. Toward a Fully Realized Human Being: Dewey's Active-Individual-Always-in-the-Making.Hongmei Peng - 2008 - Education and Culture 24 (1):pp. 20-32.
    This essay explores the conception of the individual in Dewey's democratic writings. Following Dewey's lead, I argue that it is human individuality, including our impulses, habits, and capacities, along with an appropriate environment, that represents the uniqueness and power of every individual. In achieving our individuality, we form habits to live and to grow; we strive toward a fully realized human being, while we perform a unique function in keeping the community growing. Dewey's theory of self-construction provides a theoretical foundation (...)
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  • Canonizing Dewey: Naturalism, Logical Empiricism, and the Idea of American Philosophy.Andrew Jewett - 2011 - Modern Intellectual History 8 (1):91-125.
    Between World War I and World War II, the students of Columbia University's John Dewey and Frederick J. E. Woodbridge built up a school of philosophical naturalism sharply critical of claims to value-neutrality. In the 1930s and 1940s, the second-generation Columbia naturalists (John Herman Randall Jr, Herbert W. Schneider, Irwin Edman, Horace L. Friess, and James Gutmann) and their students who later joined the department (Charles Frankel, Joseph L. Blau, Albert Hofstadter, and Justus Buchler) reacted with dismay to the arrival (...)
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  • Configuring the Moral Self: Aristotle and Dewey. [REVIEW]Nicholas O. Pagan - 2008 - Foundations of Science 13 (3-4):239-250.
    Focusing on the concept of “the moral self” this essay explores relationships between Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics and John Dewey’s moral pragmatism and tries to evaluate the extent to which in his work on ethics Aristotle may be considered a pragmatist. Aristotle foreshadows pragmatism, for example, in preferring virtue-based to rule-based ethics, in contending that the moral status of a person’s actions and the nature of the person’s selfhood are interdependent, and in stressing the key role of habits in character formation. (...)
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  • Charles Peirce's Rhetoric and the Pedagogy of Active Learning.James Liszka - 2013 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (7):781-788.
  • Re-Interpretation in Historiography: John Dewey and the Neo-Humanist Tradition.Johannes Bellmann - 2004 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 23 (5-6):467-488.
    Did John Dewey’s ‘new philosophy of education’ really try to dissolve the whole block of tradition or is his debt namely to educational core-concepts of neo-humanism deeper than he was prepared to acknowledge? After some general remarks on the process of reception as productive re-adaptation and its implication for historiography I will deal with Dewey’s own contexts that shape the interpretative grid through which he receives the tradition. Two case studies attempt to illustrate both continuity and discontinuity with a specific (...)
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