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  1. The Concept of Governance in Dual-Use Research.Alex Dubov - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (3):447-457.
    The rapid advance of life science within the context of increased international concern over the potential misuse of findings has resulted in the lack of agreement on the issues of responsibility, control and collaboration. This progress of knowledge outpaces the efforts of creating moral and legal guidelines for the detection and minimization of the risks in the research process. There is a need to identify and address normative aspects of dual-use research. This paper focuses on the issues of safety and (...)
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  • Dual-Use Decision Making: Relational and Positional Issues.Nicholas G. Evans - 2014 - Monash Bioethics Review 32 (3-4):268-283.
    Debates about dual-use research often turn on the potential for scientific research to be used to benefit or harm humanity. This dual-use potential is conventionally understood as the product of the magnitude of the harms and benefits of dual-use research, multiplied by their likelihood. This account, however, neglects important social aspects of the use of science and technology. In this paper, I supplement existing conceptions of dual-use potential to account for the social context of dual-use research. This account incorporates relational (...)
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  • Introducing Survival Ethics Into Engineering Education and Practice.C. Verharen, J. Tharakan, G. Middendorf, M. Castro-Sitiriche & G. Kadoda - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (2):599-623.
    Given the possibilities of synthetic biology, weapons of mass destruction and global climate change, humans may achieve the capacity globally to alter life. This crisis calls for an ethics that furnishes effective motives to take global action necessary for survival. We propose a research program for understanding why ethical principles change across time and culture. We also propose provisional motives and methods for reaching global consensus on engineering field ethics. Current interdisciplinary research in ethics, psychology, neuroscience and evolutionary theory grounds (...)
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  • Scientific Research and Human Rights: A Response to Kitcher on the Limitations of Inquiry.Elizabeth Victor - 2014 - Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (4):1045-1063.
    In his recent work exploring the role of science in democratic societies Kitcher claims that scientists ought to have a prominent role in setting the agenda for and limits to research. Against the backdrop of the claim that the proper limits of scientific inquiry is John Stuart Mill’s Harm Principle , he identifies the limits of inquiry as the point where the outcomes of research could cause harm to already vulnerable populations. Nonetheless, Kitcher argues against explicit limitations on unscrupulous research (...)
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  • Scientific Self-Regulation—so Good, How Can It Fail?Patrick L. Taylor - 2009 - Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (3):395-406.
    To be a functional alternative to government regulation, self-regulation of science must be credible to both scientists and the public, accountable, ethical, and effective. According to some, serious problems continue in research ethics in the United States despite a rich history of proposed self-regulatory standards and oversight devices. Successful efforts at self-regulation in stem cell research contrast with unsuccessful efforts in research ethics, particularly conflicts of interest. Part of the cause for a lack of success in self-regulation is fragmented, disconnected (...)
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  • Editors' Overview: Forbidding Science? [REVIEW]Gary E. Marchant & Stephanie J. Bird - 2009 - Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (3):263-269.
  • Geoengineering as Collective Experimentation.Jack Stilgoe - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (3):851-869.
    Geoengineering is defined as the ‘deliberate and large-scale intervention in the Earth’s climatic system with the aim of reducing global warming’. The technological proposals for doing this are highly speculative. Research is at an early stage, but there is a strong consensus that technologies would, if realisable, have profound and surprising ramifications. Geoengineering would seem to be an archetype of technology as social experiment, blurring lines that separate research from deployment and scientific knowledge from technological artefacts. Looking into the experimental (...)
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