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The Visible and the Revealed

Fordham University Press (2008)

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  1. On Seizing the Source: Toward a Phenomenology of Religious Violence.Michael Staudigl - 2016 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 24 (5):744-782.
    In this paper I argue that we need to analyze ‘religious violence’ in the ‘post-secular context’ in a twofold way: rather than simply viewing it in terms of mere irrationality, senselessness, atavism, or monstrosity – terms which, as we witness today on an immense scale, are strongly endorsed by the contemporary theater of cruelty committed in the name of religion – we also need to understand it in terms of an ‘originary supplement’ of ‘disengaged reason’. In order to confront its (...)
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  • Etinių Aporijų Prasmė Ir / Ar Beprasmybė: Derrida Pokalbis Su Levinu.Giedrė Tatarūnaitė - 2016 - Logos: A Journal, of Religion, Philosophy Comparative Cultural Studies and Art 89:193-206.
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  • Is Love a Gift? A Philosophical Inquiry About Givenness.Wellington José Santana - 2016 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 57 (134):441-454.
    ABSTRACT The contemporary philosophical debate about "gift" brought into light above all by French philosophers Jacques Derrida and Jean-Luc Marion, brought about new and live discussions regarding what gift is and what is its nature. The present article analyses whether or not love can be regarded as a gift or, rather, follow the same problem showed by Derrida. According to him, every gift carries an internal contradiction and can never be and, therefore, will never be gift. A gift is impossible. (...)
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  • God and Givenness: Towards a Phenomenology of Mysticism.Steven DeLay - 2014 - Continental Philosophy Review 47 (1):87-106.
    This essay addresses the questions of whether the givenness of God is something possible, intelligible—and, if so, what such givenness might involve. In the interest of situating these questions in historical context, I first summarize Kant’s, Hegel’s, and Habermas’s respective accounts of the relationship between belief in God and philosophical knowledge. I then further situate critical philosophy’s appropriation of God by way of a discussion of how some of this appropriation’s fiercest critics—existentialists such as Sartre, Shestov, and Kierkegaard—object to its (...)
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  • Towards a Saturated Faith: Jean-Luc Marion and Jean-Luc Nancy on the Possibility of Belief After Deconstruction.Ashok Collins - 2015 - Sophia 54 (3):321-341.
    This article aims to explore the philosophical approach to faith after deconstruction as manifested in the work of Jean-Luc Marion and Jean-Luc Nancy. By taking the saturated phenomenon as its focus, the analysis seeks to demonstrate that whilst Marion’s thinking proves to be an innovative re-imagining of the possibilities of phenomenology, its problematic recourse to a supplementary hermeneutic means that saturation can never be adequately applied to faith without simultaneously compromising the excessive intuition upon which it relies. The article then (...)
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  • Marion, Levinas, and Heidegger on the Question Concerning Ontotheology.Joeri Schrijvers - 2010 - Continental Philosophy Review 43 (2):207-239.
    In this article, the differences between Jean-Luc Marion, Emmanuel Levinas and Martin Heidegger’s approaches to ontotheology are discussed. Whereas Marion argues for a historical approach to this question, i.e., testing whether ontotheology can be detected in this or that thinker in this history of philosophy, this article aims, with Levinas and Heidegger, for an ontological approach to the question concerning ontotheology. In this regard, this text expresses wonder about Marion’s claim that Medieval theology would not have succumbed to ontotheology whereas (...)
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  • On Shared Hopes for (Mashup) Philosophy of Religion: A Reply to Trakakis.J. Aaron Simmons - 2013 - Heythrop Journal 54 (2):691-710.
  • IJPR: Beyond the Limit and Limiting the Beyond. [REVIEW]Michael Purcell - 2010 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 68 (1-3):121-138.
    It is now almost 20 years since Janicaud’s critique of the ‘theological turn in French phenomenology’ (Janicaud 1991, 2000), with its emphasis on phenomenology and theology as two and never one. Yet since that time there been an explosion of phenomenologies which are, if not overtly, implicitly religious and phenomenology. Thus, we have phenomenologies of prayer, or love, or hope, and the possibilities of further phenomenologies. The challenge of these emerging phenomenologies is that there seems to be no noematic correlate (...)
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  • Traces of Reduction: Marion and Heidegger on the Phenomenon of Religion.Brian Rogers - 2014 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 52 (2):184-205.
    In his work, Being Given, Jean-Luc Marion calls for a phenomenological investigation of the givenness (donation) of the phenomenon. As a phenomenologist of religion, Marion aims to give a philosophical account of the possibility of revelation, something which by definition is unconditionally given. In Being Given, he contends that his phenomenological reduction to unconditional givenness (in the figure of the saturated phenomenon) can account for religious phenomena in a way that respects the subject matter, all the while remaining philosophically neutral. (...)
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  • Fine Art as Preparation for Christian Love.Ian Rottenberg - 2014 - Journal of Religious Ethics 42 (2):243-262.
    This essay links Jean-Luc Marion's phenomenology of fine art to his description of Christian love. It does so by carefully showing how Marion's overall project is closely related to Kant's well-known account of the relationship between aesthetics and morality. While Kant and Marion both believe that aesthetic experience can lay the groundwork for moral action, their contrasting views of morality lead them to very different articulations of such a relationship. While Kant sees encounters with fine art as preparing individuals for (...)
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