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  1. Balancing Cultural Pluralism and Universal Bioethical Standards: A Multiple Strategy.Fabio Macioce - 2016 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 19 (3):393-402.
    If we want to take firm the importance of universal principles in Bioethics, but at the same time we want to take seriously the importance of cultural diversity and pluralism, it is necessary to adopt a multifaceted approach. In the article I argue that a possible way out is a sort of hermeneutic approach, in order to reduce the ambivalence that stems from the dual recognition of cultural diversity and universal value of human rights. Through this approach conflicting principles and (...)
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  • Health Care Accessibility for Chronic Illness Management and End-of-Life Care: A View From Rural America.Kathryn E. Artnak, Richard M. McGraw & Vayden F. Stanley - 2011 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (2):140-155.
    Nearly $2 trillion is spent annually in the U.S. treating chronic illness — yet accessibility to quality health care services in rural communities for the chronically ill and dying remains problematic. Unique barriers present special challenges to a meaningful discussion of and subsequent strategies for addressing these issues in the context of increasingly scarce resources.
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  • Health Care Accessibility for Chronic Illness Management and End-of-Life Care: A View From Rural America.Kathryn E. Artnak, Richard M. McGraw & Vayden F. Stanley - 2011 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (2):140-155.
    The Institute of Medicine reporting on the quality of health care in America recommends six aims for achieving the health care system we could have. Together with the Institute for Healthcare Improvement Triple Aim initiative, a framework has emerged to challenge providers, educators, and policymakers to remake the health care system according to specific objectives: to provide care that is safe, effective, patient-centered, timely, efficient, and equitable to more people at a price we can afford. Complicating this mission of better (...)
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  • Using Questions to Improve Informed Consent Form Reading Behavior in Students.Michael M. Knepp - 2018 - Ethics and Behavior 28 (7):560-577.
    Previous research shows that students often do not read informed consent forms to understand their rights. Four hundred fifty-eight students participated in an advertised temperament study that actually measured whether they noticed a manipulation within the consent form. Answering five questions about the form raised the percentage of students noticing the manipulation in multiple settings; however, overall rates were low. Fewer than 10% of ethnic minority students noticed the manipulation. If the goal of consent forms in higher education remains an (...)
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  • The Right to Accessible and Acceptable Healthcare Services. Negotiating Rules and Solutions With Members of Ethnocultural Minorities.Fabio Macioce - 2019 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 16 (2):227-236.
    The right to health implies, among other things, that individuals and communities must be allowed to have a voice in decisions concerning the definition of their well-being. The article argues for a more active participation of ethnocultural minorities in healthcare decisions and highlights the relevance of strategies aimed at creating a bottom-up engagement of people and groups, as well as of measures aimed at a broader organizational flexibility, in order to meet migrants’ and minorities’ needs. Finally, the article clarifies that (...)
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  • Promoting Human Subjects Training for Place-Based Communities and Cultural Groups in Environmental Research: Curriculum Approaches for Graduate Student/Faculty Training.Dianne Quigley - 2015 - Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (1):209-226.
    A collaborative team of environmental sociologists, community psychologists, religious studies scholars, environmental studies/science researchers and engineers has been working together to design and implement new training in research ethics, culture and community-based approaches for place-based communities and cultural groups. The training is designed for short and semester-long graduate courses at several universities in the northeastern US. The team received a 3 year grant from the US National Science Foundation’s Ethics Education in Science and Engineering in 2010. This manuscript details the (...)
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