Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Neither 'Good' in Terms of 'Better' nor 'Better' in Terms of 'Good'.Johan E. Gustafsson - 2014 - Noûs 48 (1):466-473.
    In this paper, I argue against defining either of ‘good’ and ‘better’ in terms of the other. According to definitions of ‘good’ in terms of ‘better’, something is good if and only if it is better than some indifference point. Against this approach, I argue that the indifference point cannot be defined in terms of ‘better’ without ruling out some reasonable axiologies. Against defining ‘better’ in terms of ‘good’, I argue that this approach either cannot allow for the incorruptibility of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Kant and Natural Kind Terms.Luca Forgione - 2016 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 31 (1):55-72.
    As is well known, the linguistic/philosophical reflection on natural kind terms has undergone a remarkable development in the early seventies with Putnam and Kripke’s essentialist approaches, touching upon different aspects of Kan’s slant. Preliminarily, however, it might be useful to review some of the theoretical stages in Locke and Leibniz’s approaches on natural kind terms in the light of contemporary reflections, to eventually pinpoint Kant’s contribution and see how some commentators have placed it within the theory of direct reference. Starting (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Leibnizian Causation.Michael J. Futch - 2005 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 56 (3):451-467.
    This article examines Leibniz's philosophy of causation with the aim of clarifying how causes are related to their effects. I argue that, much like J. L. Mackie's INUS conditions, Leibnizian causes are members of complex causal conditions. More precisely, Leibniz identifies causes with elements of complex causal conditions, where the complex condition as a whole is sufficient for the effect, and the cause is a necessary part of that condition. This conception of causation is able to incorporate Leibniz's many other (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Leibnizian Soft Reduction of Extrinsic Denominations and Relations.Ari Maunu - 2004 - Synthese 139 (1):143-164.
    Leibniz, it seems, wishes to reduce statements involving relations or extrinsic denominations to ones solely in terms of individual accidents or, respectively, intrinsic denominations. His reasons for this appear to be that relations are merely mental things (since they cannot be individual accidents) and that extrinsic denominations do not represent substances as they are on their own. Three interpretations of Leibniz''s reductionism may be distinguished: First, he allowed only monadic predicates in reducing statements (hard reductionism); second, he allowed also `implicitly (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Leibniz on Body, Force and Extension.Daniel Garber & Jean-Baptiste Rauzy - 2005 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 105 (1):347 - 368.
  • Relations and Truthmaking.Fraser MacBride - 2011 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 111 (1pt1):161-179.
    Can Bradley's Regress be solved by positing relational tropes as truth-makers? No, no more than Russell's paradox can be solved by positing Fregean extensions. To call a trope relational is to pack into its essence the relating function it is supposed to perform but without explaining what Bradley's Regress calls into question, viz. the capacity of relations to relate. This problem has been masked from view by the (questionable) assumption that the only genuine ontological problems that can be intelligibly raised (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Learning From Leibniz: Whitehead on Mind, Matter and Monads.Pierfrancesco Basile - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (6):1128-1149.
    Whitehead's system may be interpreted as a majestic attempt at recasting Leibniz's theory of monads in terms of sounder ontological categories. After a brief introductory section on the sources of Whitehead's knowledge of Leibniz's philosophy, the paper explains why Whitehead turned to Leibniz for metaphysical inspiration. Attention then shifts to Whitehead's understanding of the problems involved with Leibniz's theory of monads and his alternative explanation of monadic causation. Whitehead's endeavour to install windows in Leibniz's monads may not be entirely convincing, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Leibniz and Kant on Possibility and Existence.Ohad Nachtomy - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (5):953-972.
    This paper examines the Leibnizian background to Kant's critique of the ontological argument. I present Kant's claim that existence is not a real predicate, already formulated in his pre-critical essay of 1673, as a generalization of Leibniz's reasoning regarding the existence of created things. The first section studies Leibniz's equivocations on the notion of existence and shows that he employs two distinct notions of existence ? one for God and another for created substances. The second section examines Kant's position in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Monadic Interaction.Stephen Puryear - 2010 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (5):763-796.
    Leibniz has almost universally been represented as denying that created substances, including human minds and the souls of animals, can causally interact either with one another or with bodies. Yet he frequently claims that such substances are capable of interacting in the special sense of what he calls 'ideal' interaction. In order to reconcile these claims with their favored interpretation, proponents of the traditional reading often suppose that ideal action is not in fact a genuine form of causation but instead (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • The Structure of Leibnizian Simple Substances.John Whipple - 2010 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (3):379-410.
  • Leibniz's Non-Tensed Theory of Time.Michael J. Futch - 2002 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 16 (2):125 – 139.
    Leibniz's philosophy of time, often seen as a precursor to current forms of relationalism and causal theories of time, has rightly earned the admiration of his more recent counterparts in the philosophy of science. In this article, I examine Leibniz's philosophy of time from a new perspective: the role that tense and non-tensed temporal properties/relations play in it. Specifically, I argue that Leibniz's philosophy of time is best (and non-anachronistically) construed as a non-tensed theory of time, one that dispenses with (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Fluid Plenum: Leibniz on Surfaces and the Individuation of Body.Timothy Crockett - 2009 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (4):735-767.
  • Extrinsic Denominations and Universal Expression in Leibniz.Ari Maunu - 2004 - Dialogue 43 (1):83-97.
    The paper discusses Leibniz's theory of denominations, expression, and individual notions, the central claim being that the key to many of Leibniz's fundamental theses is to consider his argument, starting from his predicate-in-subject account of truth (that in a true statement the notion of the predicate is contained in that of the subject), against purely extrinsic denominations: this argument shows why there is an internal foundation for all denominations, why everything in the world is interconnected, why each substance expresses all (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Leibniz and Huayan Buddhism: Monads as Modified Li?Casey Rentmeester - 2014 - Lyceum 13 (1):36-57.
  • The Sanskrit of Science.Frits Staal - 1995 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 23 (1):73-127.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Modalities in Language, Thought and Reality in Leibniz, Descartes and Crusius.Hans Burkhardt - 1988 - Synthese 75 (2):183 - 215.
  • Artificial Languages Across Sciences and Civilizations.Frits Staal - 2006 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 34 (1-2):89-141.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Reasoning and Computation in Leibniz.Leen Spruit & Guglielmo Tamburrini - 1991 - History and Philosophy of Logic 12 (1):1-14.
    Leibniz's overall view of the relationship between reasoning and computation is discussed on the basis of two broad claims that one finds in his writings, concerning respectively the nature of human reasoning and the possibility of replacing human thinking by a mechanical procedure. A joint examination of these claims enables one to appreciate the wide scope of Leibniz's interests for mechanical procedures, concerning a variety of philosophical themes further developed both in later logical investigations and in methodological contributions to cognitive (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • On the Mind Dependence of Truth.Diego Marconi - 2006 - Erkenntnis 65 (3):301 - 318.
    The claim that truth is mind dependent has some initial plausibility only if truth bearers are taken to be mind dependent entities such as beliefs or statements. Even on that assumption, however, the claim is not uncontroversial. If it is spelled out as the thesis that “in a world devoid of mind nothing would be true”, then everything depends on how the phrase ‘true in world w’ is interpreted. If ‘A is true in w’ is interpreted as ‘A is true (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Comments on Mugnai.Luca Morena - 2005 - Dialectica 59 (4):517–520.
    The focus of the following comments will be mainly on Mugnai's characterization of Leibniz's ‘mild nominalism’. Mugnai seems to suggest that Leibniz might have had in mind an ontological commitment view. My idea is that such a construal can be somewhat misleading, for Leibniz's ontological cautiousness seems to stem, in an utter Ockhamistic spirit, from more general considerations about theory building and theory choice.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Why Corporeal Substances Keep Popping Up in Leibniz's Later Philosophy.Glenn A. Hartz - 1998 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 6 (2):193 – 207.
  • Leibniz's Notion of an Aggregate.Paul Lodge - 2001 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 9 (3):467 – 486.
  • Leibniz's Argument for the Identity of Indiscernibles in His Correspondence with Clarke.Gonzalo Rodriguez-Pereyra - 1999 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 77 (4):429 – 438.
    In Section 21 of his fifth letter to Clarke Leibniz attempts to derive the Identity of Indiscernibles from an application of the Principle of Sufficient Reason to God´s act of creation, namely that God has a reason to create the world he creates. In this paper I argue that this argument fails, not just because the Identity of Indiscernibles is false, but because there is a counterexample to one of the premises that Leibniz cannot satisfactorily rule out.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Urbild Und Abbild. Leibniz, Kant Und Hausdorff Über Das Raumproblem.Marco Giovanelli - 2010 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 41 (2):283-313.
    The article attempts to reconsider the relationship between Leibniz’s and Kant’s philosophy of geometry on the one hand and the nineteenth century debate on the foundation of geometry on the other. The author argues that the examples used by Leibniz and Kant to explain the peculiarity of the geometrical way of thinking are actually special cases of what the Jewish-German mathematician Felix Hausdorff called “transformation principle”, the very same principle that thinkers such as Helmholtz or Poincaré applied in a more (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Leibniz on Substance and Changing Properties.Massimo Mugnai - 2005 - Dialectica 59 (4):503–516.
    The paper examines three essays that Leibniz wrote in 1688, immediately after the composition of the Discourse on Metaphysics, one of his most organic philosophical works. The main topics which emerge from these essays are: the relationship between substance and accidents; the nature of accidents; and, more generally, the nature of abstract entities. Given that accidents' nature is that of changing, Leibniz sees how hard it is to give an account of the relationship between substance and accidents that does not (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Representationalism and the Linguistic Question in Early Modern Philosophy.Dachun Yang - 2008 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (4):595-606.
    The view of language is greatly changed from early modern philosophy to later modern philosophy and to postmodern philosophy. The linguistic question in early modern philosophy, which is characterized by rationalism and empiricism, is discussed in this paper. Linguistic phenomena are not at the center of philosophical reflections in early modern philosophy. The subject of consciousness is at the center of the philosophy, which makes language serve purely as an instrument for representing thoughts. Locke, Leibniz and Descartes consider language from (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • To Imagine, to Recollect, Per Chance to Discover: The Modern Socratic Dialogue and the History of Philosophy.Bernard Roy - 2005 - Philosophical Practice 1 (3):159-170.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • To Imagine, to Recollect, Per Chance to Discover: The Modern Socratic Dialogue and the History of Philosophy.Bernard Roy - 2005 - Philosophical Practice: Journal of the American Philosophical Practitioners Association 1 (3):159-170.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • A New Analysis of Quasianalysis.Hannes Leitgeb - 2007 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 36 (2):181-226.
    We investigate the conditions under which quasianalysis, i.e., Carnap's method of abstraction in his Aufbau, yields adequate results. In particular, we state both necessary and sufficient conditions for the so-called faithfulness and fullness of quasianalysis, and analyze adequacy as the conjunction of faithfulness and fullness. It is shown that there is no method of (re-)constructing properties from similarity that delivers adequate results in all possible cases, if the same set of individuals is presupposed for properties and for similarity, and if (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations