Switch to: References

Citations of:

Distributive equality

Mind 124 (496):1045-1109 (2015)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Prioritarianism: A Response to Critics.Matthew D. Adler & Nils Holtug - 2019 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 18 (2):101-144.
    Prioritarianism is a moral view that ranks outcomes according to the sum of a strictly increasing and strictly concave transformation of individual well-being. Prioritarianism is ‘welfarist’ as well as satisfying three further axioms: Pigou–Dalton, Separability, and Continuity. Philosophical discussion of prioritarianism was galvanized by Derek Parfit’s 1991 Lindley Lecture. Since then, and notwithstanding Parfit’s support, a variety of criticisms of prioritarianism have been advanced: by utilitarians, egalitarians, and sufficientists.In previous work, we have each endorsed prioritarianism. This article sets forth a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Priority View.David McCarthy - 2017 - Economics and Philosophy 33 (2):215–57.
    According to the priority view, or prioritarianism, it matters more to benefit people the worse off they are. But how exactly should the priority view be defined? This article argues for a highly general characterization which essentially involves risk, but makes no use of evaluative measurements or the expected utility axioms. A representation theorem is provided, and when further assumptions are added, common accounts of the priority view are recovered. A defense of the key idea behind the priority view, the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Against Anonymous Pareto.Eran Fish - 2019 - Utilitas 31 (1):3-19.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Risk-Free Approaches to the Priority View.David McCarthy - 2013 - Erkenntnis 78 (2):421-449.
    Parfit advertised the priority view as a new and fundamental theory in the ethics of distribution. He never discusses risk, and many writers follow suit when discussing the priority view. This article formalizes two popular arguments for a commonly accepted risk-free definition of the priority view. One is based on a direct attempt to define the priority view, the other is based on a contrast with utilitarianism and egalitarianism. But neither argument succeeds, and more generally, it is not possible to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations