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  1. On Learnability, Empirical Foundations, and Naturalness.W. J. M. Levelt - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (3):501-501.
  • From Implausible Artificial Neurons to Idealized Cognitive Models: Rebooting Philosophy of Artificial Intelligence.Catherine Stinson - forthcoming - Philosophy of Science.
    There is a vast literature within philosophy of mind that focuses on artificial intelligence, but hardly mentions methodological questions. There is also a growing body of work in philosophy of science about modeling methodology that hardly mentions examples from cognitive science. Here these discussions are connected. Insights developed in the philosophy of science literature about the importance of idealization provide a way of understanding the neural implausibility of connectionist networks. Insights from neurocognitive science illuminate how relevant similarities between models and (...)
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  • Concepts: Stored or Created?Marco Mazzone & Elisabetta Lalumera - 2010 - Minds and Machines 20 (1):47-68.
    Are concepts stable entities, unchanged from context to context? Or rather are they context-dependent structures, created on the fly? We argue that this does not constitute a genuine dilemma. Our main thesis is that the more a pattern of features is general and shared, the more it qualifies as a concept. Contextualists have not shown that conceptual structures lack a stable, general core, acting as an attractor on idiosyncratic information. What they have done instead is to give a contribution to (...)
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  • Principles for Implicit Learning.Axel Cleeremans - 1997 - In Dianne C. Berry (ed.), How Implicit is Implicit Learning? Oxford University Press.
    Complete URL to this document: http://srsc.ulb.ac.be/axcWWW/93-Principles.html.
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  • Stipulating Versus Discovering Representations.David C. Plaut & James L. McClelland - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):489-491.
    Page's proposal to stipulate representations in which individual units correspond to meaningful entities is too unconstrained to support effective theorizing. An approach combining general computational principles with domain-specific assumptions, in which learning is used to discover representations that are effective in solving tasks, provides more insight into why cognitive and neural systems are organized the way they are.
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  • Raising the Curtain: Exploring Dancers' Perceptions of Obligation Through the Psychological Contract Lens.Alicia R. Stanway, Sarbari Bordia & Erich C. Fein - 2013 - Arts and Humanities in Higher Education 12 (2-3):254-267.
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  • The Rules Versus Similarity Distinction.Emmanuel M. Pothos - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (1):1-14.
    The distinction between rules and similarity is central to our understanding of much of cognitive psychology. Two aspects of existing research have motivated the present work. First, in different cognitive psychology areas we typically see different conceptions of rules and similarity; for example, rules in language appear to be of a different kind compared to rules in categorization. Second, rules processes are typically modeled as separate from similarity ones; for example, in a learning experiment, rules and similarity influences would be (...)
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  • Contrasting Associative and Statistical Theories of Contingency Judgments.Rick R. Mehta - unknown
    "Blocking" refers to judgments of a moderate contingency being lowered when contrasted with a strong contingency. The Rescorla-Wagner model and causal model theory account for blocking through different mechanisms. To examine the predictions from these two models, seven experiments tested the extent to which "causal scenario" and "causal order" would influence whether blocking was observed in human contingency learning tasks. "Causal scenario" was manipulated by contrasting responses to two causes of one effect or to one cause of two effects; "causal (...)
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  • Is Memory for Remembering? Recollection as a Form of Episodic Hypothetical Thinking.Felipe De Brigard - 2014 - Synthese 191 (2):1-31.
    Misremembering is a systematic and ordinary occurrence in our daily lives. Since it is commonly assumed that the function of memory is to remember the past, misremembering is typically thought to happen because our memory system malfunctions. In this paper I argue that not all cases of misremembering are due to failures in our memory system. In particular, I argue that many ordinary cases of misremembering should not be seen as instances of memory’s malfunction, but rather as the normal result (...)
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  • Integrating Experiential and Distributional Data to Learn Semantic Representations.Mark Andrews, Gabriella Vigliocco & David Vinson - 2009 - Psychological Review 116 (3):463-498.
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  • Theoretical and Computational Analysis of Skill Learning, Repetition Priming, and Procedural Memory.Prahlad Gupta & Neal J. Cohen - 2002 - Psychological Review 109 (2):401-448.
  • Why There Are Complementary Learning Systems in the Hippocampus and Neocortex: Insights From the Successes and Failures of Connectionist Models of Learning and Memory.James L. McClelland, Bruce L. McNaughton & Randall C. O'Reilly - 1995 - Psychological Review 102 (3):419-457.
  • Continuous Versus Discrete Information Processing: Modeling Accumulation of Partial Information.Roger Ratcliff - 1988 - Psychological Review 95 (2):238-255.
  • "Schema Abstraction" in a Multiple-Trace Memory Model.Douglas L. Hintzman - 1986 - Psychological Review 93 (4):411-428.
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  • Eye Movements Reveal Fast, Voice-Specific Priming.Megan H. Papesh, Stephen D. Goldinger & Michael C. Hout - 2016 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 145 (3):314-337.
  • An Adaptive Approach to Human Decision Making: Learning Theory, Decision Theory, and Human Performance.Jerome R. Busemeyer & In Jae Myung - 1992 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 121 (2):177-194.
  • Learning the Structure of Event Sequences.Axel Cleeremans & James L. McClelland - 1991 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 120 (3):235-253.
  • A Computational Model of Semantic Memory Impairment: Modality Specificity and Emergent Category Specificity.Martha J. Farah & James L. McClelland - 1991 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 120 (4):339-357.
  • Building Permanent Memory Codes: Codification and Repetition Effects in Word Identification.Aita Salasoo, Richard M. Shiffrin & Timothy C. Feustel - 1985 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 114 (1):50-77.
  • The Merit of Synesthesia for Consciousness Research.Tessa M. van Leeuwen, Wolf Singer & Danko Nikolić - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • Autobiographical Memory and Hyperassociativity in the Dreaming Brain: Implications for Memory Consolidation in Sleep.Caroline L. Horton & Josie E. Malinowski - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • Parallel Distributed Processing at 25: Further Explorations in the Microstructure of Cognition.Timothy T. Rogers & James L. McClelland - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (6):1024-1077.
    This paper introduces a special issue of Cognitive Science initiated on the 25th anniversary of the publication of Parallel Distributed Processing (PDP), a two-volume work that introduced the use of neural network models as vehicles for understanding cognition. The collection surveys the core commitments of the PDP framework, the key issues the framework has addressed, and the debates the framework has spawned, and presents viewpoints on the current status of these issues. The articles focus on both historical roots and contemporary (...)
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  • The Time Course of Anticipatory Constraint Integration.Anuenue Kukona, Shin-Yi Fang, Karen A. Aicher, Helen Chen & James S. Magnuson - 2011 - Cognition 119 (1):23-42.
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  • Empathy: Its Ultimate and Proximate Bases.Stephanie D. Preston & Frans B. M. de Waal - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):1-20.
    There is disagreement in the literature about the exact nature of the phenomenon of empathy. There are emotional, cognitive, and conditioning views, applying in varying degrees across species. An adequate description of the ultimate and proximate mechanism can integrate these views. Proximately, the perception of an object's state activates the subject's corresponding representations, which in turn activate somatic and autonomic responses. This mechanism supports basic behaviors that are crucial for the reproductive success of animals living in groups. The Perception-Action Model, (...)
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  • On Language and Connectionism: Analysis of a Parallel Distributed Processing Model of Language Acquisition.Steven Pinker & Alan Prince - 1988 - Cognition 28 (1-2):73-193.
  • Complexity at Large.Carlos Gershenson - 2013 - Complexity 18 (6):1-6.
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  • Complexity at Large.Carlos Gershenson - 2015 - Complexity 20 (3):1-7.
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  • Two Types of Thought: Evidence From Aphasia.Jules Davidoff - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (1):20-21.
    Evidence from aphasia is considered that leads to a distinction between abstract and concrete thought processes and hence for a distinction between rules and similarity. It is argued that perceptual classification is inherently a rule-following procedure and these rules are unable to be followed when a patient has difficulty with name comprehension and retrieval.
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  • Understanding the Imitation Deficit in Autism May Lead to a More Specific Model of Autism as an Empathy Disorder.Tony Charman - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):29-30.
    Preston & de Waal are understandably cautious in applying their model to autism. They emphasise multiple cognitive impairments in autism, including prefrontal-executive, cerebellar-attention, and amygdala-emotion recognition deficits. Further empirical examination of imitation ability in autism may reveal deficits in the neural and cognitive basis of perception-action mapping that have a specific relation to the empathic deficit.
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  • Associative and Nonassociative Schema Theories of Learning.Asghar Iran-Nejad - 1989 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 27 (1):1-4.
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  • Transcending Inductive Category Formation in Learning.Roger C. Schank, Gregg C. Collins & Lawrence E. Hunter - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):639-651.
  • Relevant Features and Statistical Models of Generalization.James E. Corter - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):653-654.
  • Induction: Weak but Essential.Thomas G. Dietterich - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):654-655.
  • Toward a Cognitive Science of Category Learning.Robert L. Campbell & Wendy A. Kellogg - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):652-653.
  • Are There Static Category Representations in Long-Term Memory?Lawrence W. Barsalou - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):651-652.
  • Category Learning: Things Aren't so Black and White.John R. Anderson - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):651-651.
  • The Learning of Function and the Function of Learning.Roger C. Schank, Gregg C. Collins & Lawrence E. Hunter - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):672-686.
  • Are There Really Two Types of Learning?Yorick Wilks - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):671-671.
  • The Hard Questions About Noninductive Learning Remain Unanswered.Eric Wanner - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):670-670.
  • Rejecting Induction: Using Occam's Razor Too Soon.J. T. Tolliver - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):669-670.
  • The Pragmatics of Induction.Paul Thagard - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):668-669.
  • Category Differences/Automaticity.Edward E. Smith - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):667-667.
  • Salvaging Parts of the “Classical Theory” of Categorization.Dan Sperber - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):668-668.
  • Theory-Laden Concepts: Great, but What is the Next Step?Charles P. Shimp - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):666-667.
  • Approaches, Assumptions, and Goals in Modeling Cognitive Behavior.Richard E. Pastore & David G. Payne - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):665-666.
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  • The Psychology of Category Learning: Current Status and Future Prospect.Gregory L. Murphy - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):664-665.
  • Of What Use Categories?Ruth Garrett Millikan - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):663-664.
  • Induction and Explanation: Complementary Models of Learning.Pat Langley - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):661-662.
  • When Explanation is Too Hard.Michael Lebowitz - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):662-663.
  • New Failures to Learn.Barbara Landau - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):660-661.