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  1. Rules of the Game: Whose Value is Served When the Board Fires the Owners?Donald Nordberg - 2012 - Business Ethics: A European Review 21 (3):298-309.
    How does a board of directors decide what is right? The contest over this question is frequently framed as a debate between shareholder value and stakeholder rights, between a utilitarian view of the ethics of corporate governance and a deontological one. This paper uses a case study with special circumstances that allow us to examine in an unusually clear way the conflict between shareholder value and other bases on which a board can act. In the autumn of 2010, the board (...)
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  • A Model of Business Ethics.Göran Svensson & Greg Wood - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 77 (3):303 - 322.
    It appears that in the 30 years that business ethics has been a discipline in its own right a model of business ethics has not been proffered. No one appears to have tried to explain the phenomenon known as ‚business ethics’ and the ways that we as a society interact with the concept, therefore, the authors have addressed this gap in the literature by proposing a model of business ethics that the authors hope will stimulate debate. The business ethics model (...)
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  • Rules of the Game: Whose Value is Served When the Board Fires the Owners?Donald Nordberg - 2012 - Business Ethics 21 (3):298-309.
    How does a board of directors decide what is right? The contest over this question is frequently framed as a debate between shareholder value and stakeholder rights, between a utilitarian view of the ethics of corporate governance and a deontological one. This paper uses a case study with special circumstances that allows us to examine in an unusually clear way the conflict between shareholder value and other bases on which a board can act. In the autumn of 2010, the board (...)
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  • Organizational Ethics, Change, and Stakeholder Involvement: A Survey of Physicians. [REVIEW]Sarah Wall - 2007 - HEC Forum 19 (3):227-243.
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  • A Model of Business Ethics.Göran Svensson & Greg Wood - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 77 (3):303-322.
    It appears that in the 30 years that business ethics has been a discipline in its own right a model of business ethics has not been proffered. No one appears to have tried to explain the phenomenon known as 'business ethics' and the ways that we as a society interact with the concept, therefore, the authors have addressed this gap in the literature by proposing a model of business ethics that the authors hope will stimulate debate. The business ethics model (...)
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  • Principal Theory and Principle Theory: Ethical Governance From the Follower’s Perspective.Cam Caldwell, Ranjan Karri & Pamela Vollmar - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 66 (2-3):207-223.
    Organizational governance has historically focused around the perspective of principals and managers and has traditionally pursued the goal of maximizing owner wealth. This paper suggests that organizational governance can profitably be viewed from the ethical perspective of organizational followers - employees of the organization to whom important ethical duties are also owed. We present two perspectives of organizational governance: Principal Theory that suggests that organizational owners and managers can often be ethically opportunistic and take advantage of employees who serve them (...)
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