Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Experimental Artefacts.Carl F. Craver & Talia Dan-Cohen - forthcoming - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science.
  • Unmixing for Causal Inference: Thoughts on McCaffrey and Danks.Kun Zhang & Madelyn R. K. Glymour - 2018 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 71 (4):1319-1330.
    McCaffrey and Danks have posed the challenge of discovering causal relations in data drawn from a mixture of distributions as an impossibility result in functional magnetic resonance. We give an algorithm that addresses this problem for the distributions commonly assumed in fMRI studies and find that in testing, it can accurately separate data from mixed distributions. As with other obstacles to automated search, the problem of mixed distributions is not an impossible one, but rather a challenge. 1Introduction2Background3Addressing the Problem4Discussion.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Self and mental disorder: Lessons for psychiatry from naturalistic philosophy.Şerife Tekin - 2021 - Philosophy Compass 16 (1):e12715.
    The question “What is the relationship between the self and mental disorder?” is especially important for mental health professionals interested in understanding and treating patients, as most mental disorders are intimately tied to self‐related concerns, such as loss of self‐esteem and self‐control, or diminished agency and autonomy. Philosophy, along with the cognitive and behavioral sciences, offers a wealth of conceptual and empirical resources to answer this question, as the concepts of the self and psychopathology have occupied a central place in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Descriptive multiscale modeling in data-driven neuroscience.Philipp Haueis - 2022 - Synthese 200 (2):1-26.
    Multiscale modeling techniques have attracted increasing attention by philosophers of science, but the resulting discussions have almost exclusively focused on issues surrounding explanation (e.g., reduction and emergence). In this paper, I argue that besides explanation, multiscale techniques can serve important exploratory functions when scientists model systems whose organization at different scales is ill-understood. My account distinguishes explanatory and descriptive multiscale modeling based on which epistemic goal scientists aim to achieve when using multiscale techniques. In explanatory multiscale modeling, scientists use multiscale (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Beyond cognitive myopia: a patchwork approach to the concept of neural function.Philipp Haueis - 2018 - Synthese 195 (12):5373-5402.
    In this paper, I argue that looking at the concept of neural function through the lens of cognition alone risks cognitive myopia: it leads neuroscientists to focus only on mechanisms with cognitive functions that process behaviorally relevant information when conceptualizing “neural function”. Cognitive myopia tempts researchers to neglect neural mechanisms with noncognitive functions which do not process behaviorally relevant information but maintain and repair neural and other systems of the body. Cognitive myopia similarly affects philosophy of neuroscience because scholars overlook (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Amalgamating evidence of dynamics.David Danks & Sergey Plis - 2019 - Synthese 196 (8):3213-3230.
    Many approaches to evidence amalgamation focus on relatively static information or evidence: the data to be amalgamated involve different variables, contexts, or experiments, but not measurements over extended periods of time. However, much of scientific inquiry focuses on dynamical systems; the system’s behavior over time is critical. Moreover, novel problems of evidence amalgamation arise in these contexts. First, data can be collected at different measurement timescales, where potentially none of them correspond to the underlying system’s causal timescale. Second, missing variables (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations