Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. “See Me, Feel Me”: Two Modes of Affect Recognition for Real and Fictional Targets.Christiana Werner - 2020 - Topoi 39 (4):827-834.
    It is commonly presupposed that there are no decisive differences between empathy with fictional characters on one hand and empathy with real persons on the other. I distinguish two types of processes of affect recognition "Perceptual Affect Recognition" and "Affective Affect Recognition". The consensus view about empathy with fictional characters has to be challenged if "empathy" refers to the former or the latter process because of the significant differences between the fictional and the non-fictional scenario: firstly, readers as "empathizers" cannot (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • A Critical Review of Network‐Based and Distributional Approaches to Semantic Memory Structure and Processes.Abhilasha A. Kumar, Mark Steyvers & David A. Balota - 2022 - Wiley: Topics in Cognitive Science 14 (1):54-77.
    Topics in Cognitive Science, Volume 14, Issue 1, Page 54-77, January 2022.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Individual and Developmental Differences in Semantic Priming: Empirical and Computational Support for a Single-Mechanism Account of Lexical Processing.David C. Plaut & James R. Booth - 2000 - Psychological Review 107 (4):786-823.
  • Semantic Distance Effects on Object and Action Naming.Gabriella Vigliocco, David P. Vinson, Markus F. Damian & Willem Levelt - 2002 - Cognition 85 (3):B61-B69.
  • Linguistic Distributional Knowledge and Sensorimotor Grounding Both Contribute to Semantic Category Production.Briony Banks, Cai Wingfield & Louise Connell - 2021 - Cognitive Science 45 (10):e13055.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Cognitive Principles for Information Management: The Principles of Mnemonic Associative Knowledge (P-MAK).Michael Huggett, Holger Hoos & Ronald A. Rensink - 2007 - Minds and Machines 17 (4):445-485.
    Information management systems improve the retention of information in large collections. As such they act as memory prostheses, implying an ideal basis in human memory models. Since humans process information by association, and situate it in the context of space and time, systems should maximize their effectiveness by mimicking these functions. Since human attentional capacity is limited, systems should scaffold cognitive efforts in a comprehensible manner. We propose the Principles of Mnemonic Associative Knowledge (P-MAK), which describes a framework for semantically (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Integrating Experiential and Distributional Data to Learn Semantic Representations.Mark Andrews, Gabriella Vigliocco & David Vinson - 2009 - Psychological Review 116 (3):463-498.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   44 citations  
  • Correspondences Between What Infants See and Know About Causal and Self-Propelled Motion.Jessica B. Cicchino, Richard N. Aslin & David H. Rakison - 2011 - Cognition 118 (2):171-192.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Composition in Distributional Models of Semantics.Jeff Mitchell & Mirella Lapata - 2010 - Cognitive Science 34 (8):1388-1429.
    Vector-based models of word meaning have become increasingly popular in cognitive science. The appeal of these models lies in their ability to represent meaning simply by using distributional information under the assumption that words occurring within similar contexts are semantically similar. Despite their widespread use, vector-based models are typically directed at representing words in isolation, and methods for constructing representations for phrases or sentences have received little attention in the literature. This is in marked contrast to experimental evidence (e.g., in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  • Computational Exploration of Metaphor Comprehension Processes Using a Semantic Space Model.Akira Utsumi - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (2):251-296.
    Recent metaphor research has revealed that metaphor comprehension involves both categorization and comparison processes. This finding has triggered the following central question: Which property determines the choice between these two processes for metaphor comprehension? Three competing views have been proposed to answer this question: the conventionality view (Bowdle & Gentner, 2005), aptness view (Glucksberg & Haught, 2006b), and interpretive diversity view (Utsumi, 2007); these views, respectively, argue that vehicle conventionality, metaphor aptness, and interpretive diversity determine the choice between the categorization (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Automatic Extraction of Property Norm‐Like Data From Large Text Corpora.Colin Kelly, Barry Devereux & Anna Korhonen - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (4):638-682.
    Traditional methods for deriving property-based representations of concepts from text have focused on either extracting only a subset of possible relation types, such as hyponymy/hypernymy (e.g., car is-a vehicle) or meronymy/metonymy (e.g., car has wheels), or unspecified relations (e.g., car—petrol). We propose a system for the challenging task of automatic, large-scale acquisition of unconstrained, human-like property norms from large text corpora, and discuss the theoretical implications of such a system. We employ syntactic, semantic, and encyclopedic information to guide our extraction, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • An Attractor Model of Lexical Conceptual Processing: Simulating Semantic Priming.George S. Cree, Ken McRae & Chris McNorgan - 1999 - Cognitive Science 23 (3):371-414.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   32 citations  
  • Ambiguity, Competition, and Blending in Spoken Word Recognition.M. Gareth Gaskell & William D. Marslen-Wilson - 1999 - Cognitive Science 23 (4):439-462.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Strudel: A Corpus‐Based Semantic Model Based on Properties and Types.Marco Baroni, Brian Murphy, Eduard Barbu & Massimo Poesio - 2010 - Cognitive Science 34 (2):222-254.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Incrementality and Prediction in Human Sentence Processing.Gerry T. M. Altmann & Jelena Mirković - 2009 - Cognitive Science 33 (4):583-609.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   40 citations  
  • Conceptual Hierarchies in a Flat Attractor Network: Dynamics of Learning and Computations.Christopher M. O’Connor, George S. Cree & Ken McRae - 2009 - Cognitive Science 33 (4):665-708.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • A Quantitative Empirical Analysis of the Abstract/Concrete Distinction.Felix Hill, Anna Korhonen & Christian Bentz - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (1):162-177.
    This study presents original evidence that abstract and concrete concepts are organized and represented differently in the mind, based on analyses of thousands of concepts in publicly available data sets and computational resources. First, we show that abstract and concrete concepts have differing patterns of association with other concepts. Second, we test recent hypotheses that abstract concepts are organized according to association, whereas concrete concepts are organized according to (semantic) similarity. Third, we present evidence suggesting that concrete representations are more (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Specificity of Sound Symbolic Correspondences in Spoken Language.Christina Y. Tzeng, Lynne C. Nygaard & Laura L. Namy - 2017 - Cognitive Science:2191-2220.
    Although language has long been regarded as a primarily arbitrary system, sound symbolism, or non-arbitrary correspondences between the sound of a word and its meaning, also exists in natural language. Previous research suggests that listeners are sensitive to sound symbolism. However, little is known about the specificity of these mappings. This study investigated whether sound symbolic properties correspond to specific meanings, or whether these properties generalize across semantic dimensions. In three experiments, native English-speaking adults heard sound symbolic foreign words for (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Acquiring Contextualized Concepts: A Connectionist Approach.Saskia van Dantzig, Antonino Raffone & Bernhard Hommel - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (6):1162-1189.
    Conceptual knowledge is acquired through recurrent experiences, by extracting statistical regularities at different levels of granularity. At a fine level, patterns of feature co-occurrence are categorized into objects. At a coarser level, patterns of concept co-occurrence are categorized into contexts. We present and test CONCAT, a connectionist model that simultaneously learns to categorize objects and contexts. The model contains two hierarchically organized CALM modules (Murre, Phaf, & Wolters, 1992). The first module, the Object Module, forms object representations based on co-occurrences (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Impulse Processing: A Dynamical Systems Model of Incremental Eye Movements in the Visual World Paradigm.Anuenue Kukona & Whitney Tabor - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (6):1009-1051.
    The Visual World Paradigm (VWP) presents listeners with a challenging problem: They must integrate two disparate signals, the spoken language and the visual context, in support of action (e.g., complex movements of the eyes across a scene). We present Impulse Processing, a dynamical systems approach to incremental eye movements in the visual world that suggests a framework for integrating language, vision, and action generally. Our approach assumes that impulses driven by the language and the visual context impinge minutely on a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Global and Local Feature Distinctiveness Effects in Language Acquisition.Cynthia S. Q. Siew - 2021 - Cognitive Science 45 (7):e13008.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Knowledge Representations Derived From Semantic Fluency Data.Jeffrey C. Zemla - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    The semantic fluency task is commonly used as a measure of one’s ability to retrieve semantic concepts. While performance is typically scored by counting the total number of responses, the ordering of responses can be used to estimate how individuals or groups organize semantic concepts within a category. I provide an overview of this methodology, using Alzheimer’s disease as a case study for how the approach can help advance theoretical questions about the nature of semantic representation. However, many open questions (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Moving in Semantic Space in Prodromal and Very Early Alzheimer's Disease: An Item-Level Characterization of the Semantic Fluency Task.Aino M. Saranpää, Sasa L. Kivisaari, Riitta Salmelin & Sabine Krumm - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    The semantic fluency task is a widely used clinical tool in the diagnostic process of Alzheimer's disease. The task requires efficient mapping of the semantic space to produce as many items as possible within a semantic category. We examined whether healthy volunteers and patients with early Alzheimer's disease take advantage of and travel in the semantic space differently. With focus on the animal fluency task, we sought to emulate the detailed structure of the multidimensional semantic space by utilizing word2vec-method from (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • A Parallel Architecture Perspective on Pre-Activation and Prediction in Language Processing.Falk Huettig, Jenny Audring & Ray Jackendoff - 2022 - Cognition 224:105050.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Activating Semantic Knowledge During Spoken Words and Environmental Sounds: Evidence From the Visual World Paradigm.Josef Toon & Anuenue Kukona - 2020 - Cognitive Science 44 (1).
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Redundancy in Perceptual and Linguistic Experience: Comparing Feature-Based and Distributional Models of Semantic Representation.Brian Riordan & Michael N. Jones - 2011 - Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):303-345.
    Abstract Since their inception, distributional models of semantics have been criticized as inadequate cognitive theories of human semantic learning and representation. A principal challenge is that the representations derived by distributional models are purely symbolic and are not grounded in perception and action; this challenge has led many to favor feature-based models of semantic representation. We argue that the amount of perceptual and other semantic information that can be learned from purely distributional statistics has been underappreciated. We compare the representations (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  • Reconciling Embodied and Distributional Accounts of Meaning in Language.Mark Andrews, Stefan Frank & Gabriella Vigliocco - 2014 - Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (3):359-370.
    Over the past 15 years, there have been two increasingly popular approaches to the study of meaning in cognitive science. One, based on theories of embodied cognition, treats meaning as a simulation of perceptual and motor states. An alternative approach treats meaning as a consequence of the statistical distribution of words across spoken and written language. On the surface, these appear to be opposing scientific paradigms. In this review, we aim to show how recent cross-disciplinary developments have done much to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Feature Statistics Modulate the Activation of Meaning During Spoken Word Processing.Barry J. Devereux, Kirsten I. Taylor, Billi Randall, Jeroen Geertzen & Lorraine K. Tyler - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (2):325-350.
    Understanding spoken words involves a rapid mapping from speech to conceptual representations. One distributed feature-based conceptual account assumes that the statistical characteristics of concepts’ features—the number of concepts they occur in and likelihood of co-occurrence —determine conceptual activation. To test these claims, we investigated the role of distinctiveness/sharedness and correlational strength in speech-to-meaning mapping, using a lexical decision task and computational simulations. Responses were faster for concepts with higher sharedness, suggesting that shared features are facilitatory in tasks like lexical decision (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Graph‐Theoretic Properties of Networks Based on Word Association Norms: Implications for Models of Lexical Semantic Memory.Thomas M. Gruenenfelder, Gabriel Recchia, Tim Rubin & Michael N. Jones - 2016 - Cognitive Science 40 (6):1460-1495.
    We compared the ability of three different contextual models of lexical semantic memory and of a simple associative model to predict the properties of semantic networks derived from word association norms. None of the semantic models were able to accurately predict all of the network properties. All three contextual models over-predicted clustering in the norms, whereas the associative model under-predicted clustering. Only a hybrid model that assumed that some of the responses were based on a contextual model and others on (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • What's New Here?Bruce Mangan - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (1):160-161.
    O'Brien & Opie's (O&O's) theory demands a view of unconscious processing that is incompatible with virtually all current PDP models of neural activity. Relative to the alternatives, the theory is closer to an AI than a parallel distributed processing (PDP) perspective, and its treatment of phenomenology is ad hoc. It raises at least one important question: Could features of network relaxation be the “switch” that turns an unconscious into a conscious network?
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Conceptual Distinctions Amongst Generics.Sandeep Prasada, Sangeet Khemlani, Sarah-Jane Leslie & Sam Glucksberg - 2013 - Cognition 126 (3):405-422.
    Generic sentences (e.g., bare plural sentences such as “dogs have four legs” and “mosquitoes carry malaria”) are used to talk about kinds of things. Three experiments investigated the conceptual foundations of generics as well as claims within the formal semantic approaches to generics concerning the roles of prevalence, cue validity and normalcy in licensing generics. Two classes of generic sentences that pose challenges to both the conceptually based and formal semantic approaches to generics were investigated. Striking property generics (e.g. “sharks (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   25 citations  
  • What About the Unconscious?Chris Mortensen - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (1):162-162.
    O'Brien & Opie do not address the question of the psychotherapeutic role of unconscious representational states such as beliefs. A dilemma is proposed: if they accept the legitimacy of such states then they should modify what they say about dissociation, and if they do not, they owe us an account of why.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Précis of Semantic Cognition: A Parallel Distributed Processing Approach.Timothy T. Rogers & James L. McClelland - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (6):689-714.
    In this prcis we focus on phenomena central to the reaction against similarity-based theories that arose in the 1980s and that subsequently motivated the approach to semantic knowledge. Specifically, we consider (1) how concepts differentiate in early development, (2) why some groupings of items seem to form or coherent categories while others do not, (3) why different properties seem central or important to different concepts, (4) why children and adults sometimes attest to beliefs that seem to contradict their direct experience, (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  • Word Distance Affects Subjective Temporal Distance.Cheng Wang, Yu Liu & Jun Wang - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    The kappa effect is a well-reported phenomenon in which spatial distance between discrete stimuli affects the perception of temporal distance demarcated by the corresponding stimuli. Here, we report a new phenomenon that we propose to designate as the lexical kappa effect in which word distance, a non-magnitude relationship of discrete stimuli that exists in the lexical space of the mental lexicon, affects the perception of temporal distance. A temporal bisection task was used to assess the subjective perception of the time (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Analyzing the Factors Underlying the Structure and Computation of the Meaning of< Em> Chipmunk,< Em> Cherry,< Em> Chisel,< Em> Cheese, and< Em> Cello(and Many Other Such Concrete Nouns).George S. Cree & Ken McRae - 2003 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 132 (2):163.
  • What is the Right Place for Atypical Exemplars? Commentary: The Right Hemisphere Contribution to Semantic Categorization: A TMS Study.Maria Montefinese, Marco Ciavarro & Ettore Ambrosini - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Bilingual Object Naming: A Connectionist Model.Shin-Yi Fang, Benjamin D. Zinszer, Barbara C. Malt & Ping Li - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • An Explanatory Heuristic Gives Rise to the Belief That Words Are Well Suited for Their Referents.Shelbie L. Sutherland & Andrei Cimpian - 2015 - Cognition 143:228-240.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Simulating the N400 ERP Component as Semantic Network Error: Insights From a Feature-Based Connectionist Attractor Model of Word Meaning.Milena Rabovsky & Ken McRae - 2014 - Cognition 132 (1):68-89.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Integrating Conceptual Knowledge Within and Across Representational Modalities.Chris McNorgan, Jackie Reid & Ken McRae - 2011 - Cognition 118 (2):211-233.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • What Do You Want? How Perceivers Use Cues to Make Goal Inferences About Others.Joseph P. Magliano, John J. Skowronski, M. Anne Britt, C. Dominik Güss & Chris Forsythe - 2008 - Cognition 106 (2):594-632.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Get Rich Quick: The Signal to Respond Procedure Reveals the Time Course of Semantic Richness Effects During Visual Word Recognition.Ian S. Hargreaves & Penny M. Pexman - 2014 - Cognition 131 (2):216-242.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • When Pumpkin is Closer to Onion Than to Squash: The Structure of the Second Language Lexicon.Katy Borodkin, Yoed N. Kenett, Miriam Faust & Nira Mashal - 2016 - Cognition 156:60-70.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Refining and Expanding the Proposal of an Inherence Heuristic in Human Understanding.Andrei Cimpian & Erika Salomon - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (5):506-527.
    The inherence heuristic is a cognitive process that supplies quick and effortless explanations for a wide variety of observations. Due in part to biases in memory retrieval, this heuristic tends to overproduce explanations that appeal to the inherent features of the entities in the observations being explained. In this response, we use the commentators' input to clarify, refine, and expand the inherence heuristic model. The end result is a piece that complements the target article, amplifying its theoretical contribution.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Inherence Heuristic: An Intuitive Means of Making Sense of the World, and a Potential Precursor to Psychological Essentialism.Andrei Cimpian & Erika Salomon - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (5):461-480.
    We propose that human reasoning relies on an inherence heuristic, an implicit cognitive process that leads people to explain observed patterns (e.g., girls wear pink) in terms of the inherent features of their constituents (e.g., pink is an inherently feminine color). We then demonstrate how this proposed heuristic can provide a unified account for a broad set of findings spanning areas of research that might at first appear unrelated (e.g., system justification, nominal realism, is–ought errors in moral reasoning). By revealing (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  • Integrating Conceptual Knowledge Within and Across Representational Modalities.Ken McRae Chris McNorgan, Jackie Reid - 2011 - Cognition 118 (2):211.
  • Emotion and Language: Valence and Arousal Affect Word Recognition.Victor Kuperman, Zachary Estes, Marc Brysbaert & Amy Beth Warriner - 2014 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 143 (3):1065-1081.
  • A Simple Model From a Powerful Framework That Spans Levels of Analysis.Timothy T. Rogers & James L. McClelland - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (6):729-749.
    The commentaries reflect three core themes that pertain not just to our theory, but to the enterprise of connectionist modeling more generally. The first concerns the relationship between a cognitive theory and an implemented computer model. Specifically, how does one determine, when a model departs from the theory it exemplifies, whether the departure is a useful simplification or a critical flaw? We argue that the answer to this question depends partially upon the model's intended function, and we suggest that connectionist (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Computing the Meanings of Words in Reading: Cooperative Division of Labor Between Visual and Phonological Processes.Michael W. Harm & Mark S. Seidenberg - 2004 - Psychological Review 111 (3):662-720.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   60 citations  
  • Structure and Deterioration of Semantic Memory: A Neuropsychological and Computational Investigation.Timothy T. Rogers, Matthew A. Lambon Ralph, Peter Garrard, Sasha Bozeat, James L. McClelland, John R. Hodges & Karalyn Patterson - 2004 - Psychological Review 111 (1):205-235.