Switch to: References

Citations of:

The Nature of Existence

Cambridge University Press (1900)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Identity and Distinctness in Online Interaction: Encountering a Problem for Narrative Accounts of Self.Alexander D. Carruth & David W. Hill - 2015 - Ethics and Information Technology 17 (2):103-112.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Composition.Daniel Z. Korman & Chad Carmichael - 2016 - Oxford Handbooks Online.
    When some objects are the parts of another object, they compose that object and that object is composite. This article is intended as an introduction to the central questions about composition and a highly selective overview of various answers to those questions. In §1, we review some formal features of parthood that are important for understanding the nature of composition. In §2, we consider some answers to the question: which pluralities of objects together compose something? As we will see, the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • McTaggart and Modern Physics.Bradley Monton - 2009 - Philosophia 38 (2):257-264.
    This paper delves into McTaggart’s metaphysical account of reality without time, and compares and contrasts McTaggart’s account with the account of reality given by modern physics. This comparison is of interest, because there are suggestions from contemporary physics that there is no time at the fundamental level. Physicists and philosophers of physics recognize that we do not have a good understanding of how the world could be such that time is unreal. I argue that, from the perspective of one who (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Good, the Bad, and the Transitivity of Better Than.Jacob M. Nebel - 2018 - Noûs 52 (4):874-899.
    The Rachels–Temkin spectrum arguments against the transitivity of better than involve good or bad experiences, lives, or outcomes that vary along multiple dimensions—e.g., duration and intensity of pleasure or pain. This paper presents variations on these arguments involving combinations of good and bad experiences, which have even more radical implications than the violation of transitivity. These variations force opponents of transitivity to conclude that something good is worse than something that isn’t good, on pain of rejecting the good altogether. That (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Temporal Metaphysics in Z-Land.Simon Prosser - 2006 - Synthese 149 (1):77 - 96.
    John Perry has argued that language, thought and experience often contain unarticulated constituents. I argue that this idea holds the key to explaining away the intuitive appeal of the A-theory of time and the endurance theory of persistence. The A-theory has seemed intuitively appealing because the nature of temporal experience makes it natural for us to use one-place predicates like past to deal with what are really two-place relations, one of whose constituents is unarticulated. The endurance view can be treated (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • The View From Nowhen: The Mctaggart-Dummett Argument for the Unreality of Time.Kevin Falvey - 2010 - Philosophia 38 (2):297-312.
    Years ago, Michael Dummett defended McTaggart’s argument for the unreality of time, arguing that it cannot be dismissed as guilty of an “indexical fallacy.” Recently, E. J. Lowe has disputed Dummett’s claims for the cogency of the argument. I offer an elaboration and defense of Dummett’s interpretation of the argument (though not of its soundness). I bring to bear some work on tense from the philosophy of language, and some recent work on the concept of the past as it occurs (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • A Presentist's Refutation of Mellor's McTaggart.Philip Percival - 2002 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 50:91-.
    For twenty years, D. H. Mellor has promoted an influential defence of a view of time he first called the ‘tenseless’ view, but now associates with what he calls the ‘B-theory.’ It is his defence of this view, not the view itself, which is generally taken to be novel. It is organized around a forcefully presented attack on rival views which he claims to be a development of McTaggart's celebrated argument that the ‘A-series’ is contradictory. I will call this attack (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Now is the Time.M. J. Cresswell - 2006 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 84 (3):311 – 332.
    The aim of this paper is to consider some logical aspects of the debate between the view that the present is the only 'real' time, and the view that the present is not in any way metaphysically privileged. In particular I shall set out a language of first-order predicate tense logic with a now predicate, and a first order (extensional) language with an abstraction operator, in such a way that each language can be shewn to be exactly translatable into the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Eternal Facts in an Ageing Universe.Fabrice Correia & Sven Rosenkranz - 2012 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 90 (2):307 - 320.
    In recent publications, Kit Fine devises a classification of A-theories of time and defends a non-standard A-theory he calls fragmentalism, according to which reality as a whole is incoherent but fragments into classes of mutually coherent tensed facts. We argue that Fine's classification in not exhaustive, as it ignores another non-standard A-theory we dub dynamic absolutism, according to which there are tensed facts that stay numerically the same and yet undergo qualitative changes as time goes by. We expound this theory (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • The Reality of Now.William Seager - 1999 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 13 (1):69 – 82.
    The apparent 'flow' of time is one of its most mysterious features, and one which discomforts both scientists and philosophers. One of the most striking assaults upon it is McTaggart's argument that the idea of temporal flow is demonstratively incoherent. In this paper I first urge that the idea of temporal flow is an important part of our intuitive understanding of time, underpinning several of our notions about rationality and time. Second, I try to undercut McTaggart's argument by showing that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • On A- and B-Theoretic Elements of Branching Spacetimes.Matt Farr - 2012 - Synthese 188 (1):85-116.
    This paper assesses branching spacetime theories in light of metaphysical considerations concerning time. I present the A, B, and C series in terms of the temporal structure they impose on sets of events, and raise problems for two elements of extant branching spacetime theories—McCall’s ‘branch attrition’, and the ‘no backward branching’ feature of Belnap’s ‘branching space-time’—in terms of their respective A- and B-theoretic nature. I argue that McCall’s presentation of branch attrition can only be coherently formulated on a model with (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • The Intuition of Time Between Science and Art History in the Early Twentieth Century.Gabriel Motzkin - 1997 - Science in Context 10 (1):207-220.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Problem of Who: Multiple Personality, Personal Identity, and the Double Brain.Andrew Apter - 1991 - Philosophical Psychology 4 (2):219-48.
  • Husserl, the Absolute Flow, and Temporal Experience.Christoph Hoerl - 2013 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 86 (2):376-411.
    The notion of the absolute time-constituting flow plays a central role in Edmund Husserl’s analysis of our consciousness of time. I offer a novel reading of Husserl’s remarks on the absolute flow, on which Husserl can be seen to be grappling with two key intuitions that are still at the centre of current debates about temporal experience. One of them is encapsulated by what is sometimes referred to as an intentionalist (as opposed to an extensionalist) approach to temporal experience. The (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • What is a Negative Property?Sam Baron, Richard Copley-Coltheart, Raamy Majeed & Kristie Miller - 2013 - Philosophy 88 (1):33-54.
    This paper seeks to differentiate negative properties from positive properties, with the aim of providing the groundwork for further discussion about whether there is anything that corresponds to either of these notions. We differentiate negative and positive properties in terms of their functional role, before drawing out the metaphysical implications of proceeding in this fashion. We show that if the difference between negative and positive properties tabled here is correct, then negative properties are metaphysically contentious entities, entities that many philosophers (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Superiority in Value.Gustaf Arrhenius - 2005 - Philosophical Studies 123 (1-2):97-114.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • On Referring to Oneself.Maximilian de Gaynesford - 2004 - Theoria 70 (2-3):121-161.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Mc Taggart and the Truth About Time.Heather Dyke - 2002 - In Craig Callender (ed.), Time, Reality and Experience. Cambridge University Press. pp. 137-.
    McTaggart famously argued that time is unreal. Today, almost no one agrees with his conclusion. But his argument remains the locus classicus for both the A-theory and the B-theory of time. I show how McTaggart’s argument provided the impetus for both of these opposing views of the nature of time. I also present and defend what I take to be the correct view of the nature of time.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Tense, the Dynamic Lexicon, and the Flow of Time.Peter Ludlow - 2015 - Topoi 34 (1):137-142.
    One of the most gripping intuitions that people have about time is that it, in some sense “flows.” This sense of flow has been articulated in a number of ways, ranging from us moving into the future or the future rushing towards us, and there has been no shortage of metaphors and descriptions to characterize this sense of passage. Despite the many forms of the metaphor and its widespread occurrence, it has been argued that there is a deep conceptual problem (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Ideas, Causes and God.Leslie Armour - 1980 - Sophia 19 (1):14-21.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Eternal Life as an Exclusively Present Possession: Perspectives From Theology and the Philosophy of Time.Mikel Burley - 2016 - Sophia 55 (2):145-161.
    Does it make sense to think of eternal life not as an unending continuation of life subsequent to death but as fully actualized in one’s present mortal and finite life? After outlining conceptual and moral reasons for being troubled by the notion of an endless life, this article draws upon the thought of major Christian theologians and philosophers of religion to expound the idea of eternal life as a possession exclusively of the life one is presently living. Supplementing the claims (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Some Reflections on the Individuation of Events.Rom Harré - 1991 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 5 (1):49-63.
    Abstract Theories in physics require reference to manifolds of locations and events. Abstract versions of these manifolds, ?space?, ?time? and ?space?time? are frequently used as reference systems. Should they be included in the ontology of physics as well as the material manifolds from which they are abstracted? This problem can be approached through a study of the identity conditions of events. The argument is offered that neither an abstract ?time? of moments is viable, nor is the assumption that events are (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Criterion or Criteria of Change.Xiaoqiang Han - 2009 - Metaphysica 10 (2):149-156.
    In this paper, I offer an examination of the two existing criteria of change, one indicated, implicitly, by Aristotle and the other proposed, quite formally, by Russell. Both criteria engender problems. While the Aristotelian criterion is both too narrow and too broad, as it includes bogus changes and excludes subjectless changes, the Russellian criterion avoids the distinction between genuine changes and bogus changes completely. The aim of the paper is to address these problems and to show how these two existing (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • (Con)Fusing the Un(Con)Fusable.István Aranyosi - 2003 - Analysis 63 (3):215–220.
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Reply to Mr. Aranyosi.David H. Sanford - 2003 - Analysis 63 (4):305–309.
    Although Aranyosi's claim that McTaggart's "set of parts" is a set rather than a fusion is correct, his attempt to restate McTaggart's conception needs revision. Aranyosi argues that "the fusion of cats is identical with the fusion of all cat-parts, 'regardless of whether all cat-parts are parts of cats or not.'" Fusions have unique decompositions into what David Lewis calls "nice parts." Cats are nice parts of cat fusions, as are maximal spatio-temporally connected parts. Part of Aranyosi's argument fails when (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Dewey and the Question of Realism.Peter Godfrey-Smith - 2013 - Noûs 47 (4):73-89.
    An interpretation is given of John Dewey's views about “realism” in metaphysics, and of how these views relate to contemporary debates. Dewey rejected standard formulations of realism as a general metaphysical position, and interpreters have often been taken him to be sympathetic to some form of verificationism or constructivism. I argue that these interpretations are mistaken, as Dewey's unease with standard formulations of realism comes from his philosophical emphasis on intelligent control of events, by means of ordinary action. Because of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Good Life: A Defense of Attitudinal Hedonism.Fred Feldman - 2002 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (3):604-628.
    The students and colleagues of Roderick Chisholm admired and respected Chisholm. Many were filled not only with admiration, but with affection and gratitude for Chisholm throughout the time we knew him. Even now that he is dead, we continue to wish him well. Under the circumstances, many of us probably think that that wish amounts to no more than this: we hope that things went well for him when he lived; we hope that he had a good life.
    Direct download (14 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  • L'idealismo di Oxbridge Tra Lotze E Meinong. A Proposito Delle Origini Della Filosofia Analitica.Luigi Dappiano - 1994 - Axiomathes 5 (2-3):279-304.
  • What Are Sets and What Are They For?Alex Oliver & Timothy Smiley - 2006 - Philosophical Perspectives 20 (1):123–155.
  • A Physical Theory of Subjective Phenomena.James Culbertson - 1975 - World Futures 14 (3):269-288.
  • Mctaggart and the Unreality of Time.Rögnvaldur Ingthorsson - 1998 - Axiomathes 9 (3):287-306.
    McTaggart's argument for the unreality of time is generally believed to be a self-contained argument independent of McTaggart's idealist ontology. I argue that this is mistaken. It is really a demonstration of a contradiction in the appearance of time, on the basis of certain a priori ontological axioms, in particular the thesis that all times exist in parity. When understood in this way, the argument is neither obscure or unfounded, but arguably does not address those versions of the A-theory that (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • A Foundation for Presentism.Robert Pezet - 2017 - Synthese 194 (5):1809–1837.
    Presentism states that everything is present. Crucial to our understanding of this thesis is how we interpret the ‘is’. Recently, several philosophers have claimed that on any interpretation presentism comes out as either trivially true or manifestly false. Yet, presentism is meant to be a substantive and interesting thesis. I outline in detail the nature of the problem and the standard interpretative options. After unfavourably assessing several popular responses in the literature, I offer an alternative interpretation that provides the desired (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • The Place of Subjects in the Metaphysics of Material Objects.Thomas Hofweber - 2015 - Dialectica 69 (4):473-490.
    An under-explored intermediate position between traditional materialism and traditional idealism is the view that although the spatiotemporal world is purely material, minds nonetheless have a metaphysically special place in it. One way this can be is via a special role that subjects have in the metaphysics of material objects. Some metaphysical aspect of material objects might require the existence of subjects. This would support that minds must exist if material objects exist and thus that a mindless material world is impossible. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • How to Accept the Transitivity of Better Than.Justin Klocksiem - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (5):1309-1334.
    Although the thesis that the moral better than relation is transitive seems obviously true, there is a growing literature according to which Parfit’s repugnant conclusion and related puzzles reveal that this thesis is false or problematic. This paper begins by presenting several such puzzles and explaining how they can be used in arguments for the intransitivity of better than. It then proposes and defends a plausible alternative picture of the behavior of better than that both resolves the repugnant conclusion and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Heidegger's Critique of the Vulgar Notion of Time.Pierre Keller - 1996 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 4 (1):43 – 66.
    Abstract This paper compares Heidegger's conception of time with more prevalent physical and broadly psychological analyses of time. The ?vulgar? notion of time, as Heidegger understands it, is based on the assumption that time, regardless of whether it is identified with tense or not, is something that is essentially measurable by clocks. Heidegger maintains that the vulgar notion of time is a distortion of his own preferred conception of temporality. I show how temporality may be understood as the non?sequential tensed (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Truthmaker Internalism and the Mind-Dependence of Propositions.Robin Stenwall - 2016 - Acta Analytica 31 (1):59-76.
    It is generally thought that truthmaking has to be an internal relation because if it weren’t, then, as David Armstrong argues, “everything may be a truthmaker for any truth”. Depending on whether we take an internal relation to be one that is necessitated by the mere existence of its terms or one that supervenes on the intrinsic properties of its relata, the truthbearers involved in the truthmaking relation must either have their contents essentially or intrinsically. In this paper, I examine (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Rates of Passage.James van Cleve - 2011 - Analytic Philosophy 52 (3):141-170.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Bradley’s Regress.Anna-Sofia Maurin - 2012 - Philosophy Compass 7 (11):794-807.
    Ever since F. H. Bradley first formulated his famous regress argument philosophers have been hard at work trying to refute it. The argument fails, it has been suggested, either because its conclusion just does not follow from its premises, or it fails because one or more of its premises should be given up. In this paper, the Bradleyan argument, as well as some of the many and varied reactions it has received, is scrutinized.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • The Metaphysics of Groups.Nikk Effingham - 2010 - Philosophical Studies 149 (2):251-267.
    If you are a realist about groups there are three main theories of what to identify groups with. I offer reasons for thinking that two of those theories fail to meet important desiderata. The third option is to identify groups with sets, which meets all of the desiderata if only we take care over which sets they are identified with. I then canvass some possible objections to that third theory, and explain how to avoid them.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • A-Theory for B-Theorists.Josh Parsons - 2002 - Philosophical Quarterly 52 (206):1-20.
    The debate between A-theory and B-theory in the philosophy of time is a persistent one. It is not always clear, however, what the terms of this debate are. A-theorists are often lumped with a miscellaneous collection of heterodox doctrines: the view that only the present exists, that time flows relentlessly, or that presentness is a property (Williams 1996); that time passes, tense is unanalysable, or that earlier than and later than are defined in terms of pastness, presentness, and futurity (Bigelow (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Self-Consciousness, Objectivity, and Time.Gal Yehezkel - 2008 - Metaphilosophy 39 (4-5):591-611.
    Abstract: This article considers the conceptual connections between self-consciousness, objectivity, and time. The model of conceptual analysis employed examines the necessary conditions of the meaningfulness of expressions in language. In the course of this analysis two distinct options for the explanation of self-consciousness are identified and examined. According to the first (Strawsonian) view, self-consciousness is based upon the distinction between the self and other subjects of consciousness; according to the second (Kantian) view, self-consciousness is based upon the distinction between the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Strategies for a Logic of Plurals.Alex Oliver & Timothy Smiley - 2001 - Philosophical Quarterly 51 (204):289-306.
  • Becoming: A Modest Proposal. [REVIEW]James A. McGilvray - 1976 - Philosophical Studies 30 (3):161 - 170.
    In this paper I attempt a new approach to an old technical term: becoming. I show how the theory that becoming is coming-to-be could be supported by a semantic derivation of the nominalization becoming from its verbal counterpart, by investigating the properties of the present progressive constructions in which becoming as a verbal appears. My theory denies that dates, or qualitative change, play an essential role in the analysis of becoming.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark