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  1. Myths of Nation and Empire: The Logic of America’s Liberal Empire-State.Julian Go - 2017 - Thesis Eleven 139 (1):69-83.
    While empires and civic-liberal nations have been seen as opposite and even contradictory political forms, this essay argues that they are similar. Both create and depend upon hierarchical differentiation accompanied by exclusion and subjugation. Furthermore, they are logically related. The hierarchies typically attributed to empires are inscribed into the very theoretical and institutional core of civic-liberal nationhood. Using the American ‘liberal empire-state’ as the example, the essay uncovers these hierarchies and discusses two logics of imperial differentiation: the subjugation of bodies (...)
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  • The Other Kidney: Biopolitics Beyond Recognition.Lawrence Cohen - 2001 - Body and Society 7 (2-3):9-29.
    This article links ethnographic exploration of commodified renal transactions in India to their articulation in Hindi film as practices re-animating kinship in the face of the death or diminishment of the father. To think through the work such organ stories do, I contrast the `transplant film' with the `transfusion film'. I argue transfusion narratives offer a liberal developmentalist recoding of social relations under the sign of a Nehruvian project of national recognition, while transplant narratives abandon the project of development for (...)
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  • Adam Smith and Colonialism.David Williams - 2014 - Journal of International Political Theory 10 (3):283-301.
    In the context of debates about liberalism and colonialism, the arguments of Adam Smith have been taken as illustrative of an important line of anti-colonial liberal thought. The reading of Smith presented here challenges this interpretation. It argues that Smith’s opposition to colonial rule derived largely from its impact on the metropole, rather than on its impact on the conquered and colonised; that Smith recognised colonialism had brought ‘improvement’ in conquered territories and that Smith struggled to balance recognition of moral (...)
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  • The Imperial Paradox in Liberal International Theory.Ian Hall - 2008 - Journal of International Political Theory 4 (1):146-156.
  • Politics in Medias Res: Power That Precedes and Exceeds in Foucault and Burke.Robert E. Watkins - 2010 - History of the Human Sciences 23 (2):1-19.
    Foucault famously claimed that in political theory the king’s head still needs to be cut off, proclaiming the imperative to move beyond a centralized and prohibitive conception of power and toward a more distributed, relational and productive understanding of power in political society. Ironically, Edmund Burke, famous for criticizing an actual revolutionary regicide in France, can be read as an ally in Foucault’s project of theoretical regicide and conceptual revolution. For although he staunchly defended existing monarchies in France and Britain, (...)
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  • Rewriting the Utilitarian Market: Colonial Law and Custom in Mid-Nineteenth-Century British India.Sandra Den Otter - 2001 - The European Legacy 6 (2):177-188.
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  • Relational Understanding and White Antiracist Praxis.Pamela Perry & Alexis Shotwell - 2009 - Sociological Theory 27 (1):33 - 50.
    In this article, we argue that, in order for white racial consciousness and practice to shift toward an antiracist praxis, a relational understanding of racism, the "self, "and society is necessary We find that such understanding arises from a confluence of propositional, affective, and tacit forms of knowledge about racism and one's own situatedness within it. We consider the claims sociologists have made about transformations in racial consciousness, bringing sociological theories of racism into dialogue with research on whiteness and antiracism. (...)
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  • Rawls on Race/Race in Rawls.Charles W. Mills - 2009 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 47 (S1):161-184.
  • Topographies of Hate: Islamophobia in Cyberia.Salman Sayyid - 2018 - Journal of Cyberspace Studies 2 (1):55-73.
    Islamophobia’s occurrence in any particular country has little do with the presence of Muslim; it is possible to be Islamophobic when there are virtually no Muslim around. This because the lack of Muslims is filled by the surplus of Islamophobic representations. This surplus of representations is now increasingly reliant on the internet. There are many studies reporting on Islamophobia on the internet, classifying the negative representations, the targeted acts of aggressive online behaviour against Muslims. These studies are basically taxonomies, and (...)
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  • I—Racial Justice.Charles W. Mills - 2018 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 92 (1):69-89.
    ‘Racial justice’ is a term widely used in everyday discourse, but little explored in philosophy. In this essay, I look at racial justice as a concept, trying to bring out its complexities, and urging a greater engagement by mainstream political philosophers with the issues that it raises. After comparing it to other varieties of group justice and injustice, I periodize racial injustice, relate it to European expansionism and argue that a modified Rawlsianism relying on a different version of the thought (...)
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  • Political Liberalism as a Political Theology? A Postcolonial Appendix to Paul Weithman’s Rawls, Political Liberalism and Reasonable Faith.Aakash Singh Rathore - forthcoming - Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche.
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  • Books Received. [REVIEW][author unknown] - 2000 - The European Legacy 5 (3):489-491.
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  • The Dilemmas of Globalization.Sanjay G. Reddy - 2001 - Ethics and International Affairs 15 (1):159–172.
  • The Curious Career of Liberalism in India.Partha Chatterjee - 2011 - Modern Intellectual History 8 (3):687-696.
    There is a long-standing myth that the history of modern India was foretold at the beginning of the nineteenth century by British liberals who predicted that the enlightened despotic rule of India's new conquerors would, by its beneficial effects, improve the native character and institutions sufficiently to prepare the people of that country one day to govern themselves. Lord William Bentinck, a disciple of Jeremy Bentham, while presenting as governor-general his case for the opening up of India to European settlers, (...)
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  • Nation-States as Empires, Empires as Nation-States: Two Principles, One Practice? [REVIEW]Krishan Kumar - 2010 - Theory and Society 39 (2):119-143.
  • Rewriting the Utilitarian Market: Colonial Law and Custom in Mid-Nineteenth-Century British India.Sandra Den Otter - 2001 - The European Legacy 6 (2):177-188.
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  • Feyerabend on Science and Education.Ian James Kidd - 2013 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (3):407-422.
    This article offers a sympathetic interpretation of Paul Feyerabend's remarks on science and education. I present a formative episode in the development of his educational ideas—the ‘Berkeley experience'—and describe how it affected his views on the place of science within modern education. It emerges that Feyerabend arrived at a conception of education closely related to that of Michael Oakeshott and Martin Heidegger—that of education as ‘releasement’. Each of those three figures argued that the purpose of education was not to induct (...)
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  • Liberalism and Fear of Violence.Bruce Buchan - 2001 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 4 (3):27-48.
    Liberal political thought is underwritten by an enduring fear of civil and state violence. It is assumed within liberal thought that self?interest characterises relations between individuals in civil society, resulting in violence. In absolutist doctrines, such as Hobbes?, the pacification of private persons depended on the Sovereign's command of a monopoly of violence. Liberals, by contrast, sought to claim that the state itself must be pacified, its capacity for cruelty (e.g., torture) removed, its capacity for violence (e.g., war) reduced and (...)
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  • Liberalism.Gerald Gaus - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  • The Empire of Uniformity and the Government of Subject Peoples.Christine Helliwell & Barry Hindess - 2002 - Cultural Values 6 (1-2):139-152.
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  • Colonialism.Margaret Kohn - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  • Justice as Provisionality: An Account of Contrastive Hard Cases.Monica Mookherjee - 2001 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 4 (3):67-100.
    James Tully's account of a ?post?imperial constitutionalism?, in his book Strange Multiplicity, wrongly rejects the ideal of impartiality in modern political theory. Pace Tully, this paper argues for a conception of impartiality called ?justice as provisionality?. This is demonstrated by explaining the concept of a ?contrastive hard case?. These cases, exemplified both by indigenous peoples? struggles for recognition and ?traditional? justifications for violence against women, centrally involve conflicts over the cultural interpretation of value. The paper argues that the just adjudication (...)
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