Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Drug Firms, the Codification of Diagnostic Categories, and Bias in Clinical Guidelines.Lisa Cosgrove & Emily E. Wheeler - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (3):644-653.
    The possibility that industry is exerting an undue influence on the culture of medicine has profound implications for the profession's public health mission. Policy analysts, investigative journalists, researchers, and clinicians have questioned whether academic-industry relationships have had a corrupting effect on evidence-based medicine. Psychiatry has been at the heart of this epistemic and ethical crisis in medicine. This article examines how commercial entities, such as pharmaceutical companies, influence psychiatric taxonomy and treatment guidelines. Using the conceptual framework of institutional corruption, we (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • The Sticky Standard of Care.Michelle Oberman - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (6):25-26.
    The problem at the heart of “Stemming the Standard-of-Care Sprawl: Clinician Self-Interest and the Case of Electronic Fetal Monitoring,” an article by Kayte Spector-Bagdady and colleagues in the November-December 2017 issue of the Hastings Center Report, is the persistence of a suboptimal standard of care long after evidence-driven approaches would dictate a change. That problem is not simply defensive medicine, or what the authors call “standard-of-care sprawl.” Instead, it is that, in some cases, the standard of care lags behind best (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Drug Firms, the Codification of Diagnostic Categories, and Bias in Clinical Guidelines.Lisa Cosgrove & Emily E. Wheeler - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (3):644-653.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations