Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. The Meaning, Limitations and Possibilities of Making Palliative Care a Public Health Priority by Declaring It a Human Right.T. W. Kirk - 2011 - Public Health Ethics 4 (1):84-92.
    There is a growing movement to increase access to palliative care by declaring it a human right. Calls for such a right—in the form of articles in the healthcare literature and pleas to the United Nations and World Health Organization—rarely define crucial concepts involved in such a declaration, in particular ‘palliative care’ and ‘human right’. This paper explores how such concepts might be more fully developed, the difficulties in using a human rights approach to promote palliative care, and the relevance (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Conceptualizing a Human Right to Prevention in Global HIV/AIDS Policy.B. M. Meier, K. N. Brugh & Y. Halima - 2012 - Public Health Ethics 5 (3):263-282.
    Given current constraints on universal treatment campaigns, recent advances in public health prevention initiatives have revitalized efforts to stem the tide of HIV transmission. Yet, despite a growing imperative for prevention—supported by the promise of behavioral, structural and biomedical approaches to lower the incidence of HIV—human rights frameworks remain limited in addressing collective prevention policy through global health governance. Assessing the evolution of rights-based approaches to global HIV/AIDS policy, this review finds that human rights have shifted from collective public health (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Global Child Health Ethics: Testing the Limits of Moral Communities.A. E. Denburg - 2010 - Public Health Ethics 3 (3):239-258.
    This article attempts to map the broad ethical and legal contours of global child health realities. Its interest is in international duties to reduce disparities in the health of children. Specifically, it inquires into loci of collective rights and responsibilities in this context. Clarity on the sources of this responsibility and the nature of such rights will, it is hoped, contribute to enhanced and sustained action to attenuate these inequalities. A review and critique of the current topography of global health (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Global Health Law, Ethics, and Policy.Lawrence O. Gostin & James G. Hodge - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (4):519-525.
  • Global Health Law, Ethics, and Policy.Lawrence O. Gostin & James G. Hodge - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (4):519-525.
  • An Agenda for Health Promotion.N. Murphy - 2008 - Nursing Ethics 15 (5):697-699.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Comment on Jennings, ‘Right Relation and Right Recognition in Public Health Ethics: Thinking Through the Republic of Health’.Keith Syrett - 2016 - Public Health Ethics 9 (2):180-182.
    This paper offers a brief comment on Jennings’ preceding paper, focusing on the capacity of a republican approach to public health ethics to facilitate reconceptualization of the right to health in situations of limited resources through a relational reading.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark