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  1. Games and Ideal Playgrounds.Colleen English - forthcoming - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport:1-15.
    ABSTRACTEven though many sport philosophers have worked to delineate clear definitions of play and games, typical language usage often conflates the two phenomena and even provides an undue normati...
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  • Playing with Art in Suits’ Utopia.Nathan Wildman & Alfred Archer - forthcoming - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-15.
    ABSTRACTAccording to Bernard Suits, people in Utopia would spend their time playing games and would not spend any time creating or engaging with artworks. Here, we argue against this claim. We do s...
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  • What Are We Doing When We Are Training?Paul Faulkner - forthcoming - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-15.
    ABSTRACTAmateur and professional sportspersons, Bernard Suits proposed, are differentiated by their attitude towards their sport. For the amateur, competition is a game done for its own sake, while...
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  • A Philosophy of Physical Education Oriented Toward the Game as an Object. Showing the Inexhaustible Reality of Games Through Bernard Suits’ Theory.Wenceslao Garcia-Puchades & Oscar Chiva-Bartoll - forthcoming - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-14.
    ABSTRACTAlthough a large number of theories justify the presence of games in school, all of them converge in two of the educational functions described by Biesta, socialization and qualification. In contrast to this instrumental educational approach, the present article aims to develop the bases for a philosophy of physical education oriented toward the game as an object. This proposal is supported by Suits’ theory of games and the object-oriented philosophy introduced by Harman. The text presents a justification for games in (...)
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  • Pre-Game Cheating and Playing the Game.Alex Wolf-Root - forthcoming - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-14.
    There are well-known problems for formalist accounts of game-play with regards to cheating. Such accounts seem to be committed to cheaters being unable to win–or even play–the game, yet it seems that there are instances of cheaters winning games. In this paper, I expand the discussion of such problems by introducing cases of pre-game cheating, and see how a formalist–specifically a Suitsian–account can accommodate such problems. Specifically, I look at two (fictional) examples where the alleged game-players cheat prior to a (...)
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  • Institutionalisation in E-Sports.Cem Abanazir - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 13 (2):117-131.
    Following its economic impact and rising popularity, ‘e-sports’ has become a theme within the academic debate on sports. The current discussion revolves around the definitions of sports provided by the philosophy and sociology of sports and how in turn, this can be adapted to e-sports. The premise of this article is the analysis of ‘institutionalisation’, which is claimed to be an element of modern sport. The governance and production aspects of e-sports will be the main focus where the nature of (...)
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  • Reflections on the Presence of Play in University Arts and Athletics.Aaron Harper - 2016 - Reason Papers 38 (1):38-50.
    Recent work has explored the extent to which intercollegiate athletics even belong at the university or meet the university’s mission. Just as play seems evident in athletics, it is also present in music, art, and theater. While these programs are popular targets when discussing possible cuts, few question their legitimacy at the university. In this article I argue that the justification for retaining the extracurricular status of intercollegiate sports should be based on their being especially playful. Indeed, on the basis (...)
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  • The Paradoxes of Utopian Game-Playing.Deborah P. Vossen - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (3):315-328.
    In The Grasshopper: Games, Life, and Utopia, Suits maintains the following two theses: game-playing is defined as ‘activity directed towards bringing about a specific state of affairs, using only means permitted by rules, where the rules prohibit more efficient in favour of less efficient means, and where such rules are accepted just because they make possible such activity’ and ‘game playing is what makes Utopia intelligible.’ Observing that these two theses cannot be jointly maintained absent paradox, this essay explores the (...)
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  • ‘Physicality’: One Among the Internal Goods of Sport.Robert G. Osterhoudt - 1996 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 23 (1):91-103.
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  • On Beautiful Games.R. Scott Kretchmar - 1989 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 16 (1):34-43.
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  • The “Playing” Field: Attitudes, Activities, and the Conflation of Play and Games.Chad Carlson - 2011 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 38 (1):74-87.
  • The Ethics of Performance-Enhancing Technology in Sport.Sigmund Loland - 2009 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 36 (2):152-161.
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  • Good Grasshopping and the Avoidance of Game-Spoiling.Deborah P. Vossen - 2008 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 35 (2):175-192.
    Traditionally, acts of sportsmanship have been upheld as worthy of praise. The purpose of this paper is to discern whether Bernard Suits’ Grasshopper -- in "The Grasshopper: Games, Life and Utopia" -- would share this approval. The paper begins with a conceptual analysis of good sportspersonship. From this, four action categories are identified including good sportspersonship in the forms of game desertion, changing the game, not trying, and lusory self-handicapping. A strategy for evaluation is derived from the Grasshopper’s theory. Game-playing (...)
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  • What Counts as Part of a Game? Reconsidering Skills.Cesar R. Torres - 2018 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 45 (1):1-21.
    The first goal of this paper is to reply to a number of criticisms levied by Gunnar Breivik and Robert L. Simon against an account of sporting skills I published almost 20 years ago in which I distinguished between constitutive and restorative skills and examined their normative significance. To accomplish this goal, I first summarize my characterization and classification of skills and then detail the criticisms. After responding to the latter, and thus reconsidering and hopefully strengthening my account of skill (...)
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  • Sporting Supererogation and Why It Matters.Alfred Archer - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (3):359-373.
    A commonly accepted feature of commonsense morality is that there are some acts that are supererogatory or beyond the call of duty. Recently, philosophers have begun to ask whether something like supererogation might exist in other normative domains such as epistemology and esthetics. In this paper, I will argue that there is good reason to think that sporting supererogation exists. I will then argue that recognizing the existence of sporting supererogation is important because it highlights the value of sport as (...)
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  • A Kantian View of Suits’ Utopia: ‘A Kingdom of Autotelically-Motivated Game Players’.Francisco Javier Lopez Frias - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (1):138-151.
    In this paper, I engage the debate on Suits’ theory of games by providing a Kantian view of Utopia. I argue that although the Kantian aspects of Suits’ approach are often overlooked in comparison to its Socratic-Platonic aspects, Kant’s ideas play a fundamental role in Suits’ proposal. In particular, Kant’s concept of ‘regulative idea’ is the basis of Suits’ Utopia. I regard Utopia as Suits’ regulative idea on game playing. In doing so, I take Utopia to play a double role (...)
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  • On Game Definitions.Oliver Laas - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (1):81-94.
    Wittgenstein did not claim that the ordinary language concept ‘game’ cannot be defined: he claimed that there are multiple definitions that can be adopted for special purposes, but no single definition applicable to all games. I will defend this interpretation of Wittgenstein’s position by showing its compatibility with a pragmatic argumentative view of definitions, and how this view accounts for the diversity of disagreeing game definitions in definitional disputes.
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  • On Judged Sports.Thomas Hurka - 2015 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 42 (3):317-325.
    Whereas Bernard Suits argued that judged sports such as diving and figure skating are aesthetic performances rather than games, I argue that they’re simultaneously performances and games. Moreover, their two aspects are connected, since their prelusory goal is to dive or skate beautifully and the requirement to do somersaults or triple jumps makes achieving that goal more difficult. This analysis is similar to one given by Scott Kretchmar, but by locating these sports’ aesthetic side in their goals rather than in (...)
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  • A Pluralist Conception of Play.Randolph Feezell - 2010 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 37 (2):147-165.
    The philosophical and scientific literature on play is extensive and the approaches to the study, description, and explanation of play are diverse. In this paper I intend to provide an overview of approaches to play. My interest is in describing the most fundamental categories in terms of which play is characterized, explained, and evaluated. Insofar as these categories attempt to describe what kind of reality we are talking about when we make claims about play, I hope to clarify the metaphysics (...)
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  • Don’T Bring It On: The Case Against Cheerleading as a Collegiate Sport.Andrew B. Johnson & Pam R. Sailors - 2013 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 40 (2):255 - 277.
    The 2010 Quinnipiac cheerleading case raises interesting questions about the nature of both cheerleading and sport, as well as about the moral character of each. In this paper we explore some of those questions, and argue that no form of college cheerleading currently in existence deserves, from a moral point of view, to be recognized as a sport for Title IX purposes. To reach that conclusion, we evaluate cheerleading using a quasi-legal argument based on the NCAA?s definition of sport and (...)
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  • Game as Paradox: A Rebuttal of Suits.David Myers - 2012 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 39 (1):155-168.
    Here I examine Bernard Suits?s definition of games and explain why that definition is in need of reference to representation or, put more generally, to semiosis. And, once admitting the necessity of the representational in games, Suits?s definition must also then admit the essential paradoxy of games.
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  • Convention, Audience, and Narrative: Which Play is the Thing?Leslie A. Howe - 2011 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 38 (2):135-148.
    This paper argues against the conception of sport as theatre. Theatre and sport share the characteristic that play is set in a conventionally-defined hypothetical reality, but they differ fundamentally in the relative importance of audience and the narrative point of view. Both present potential for participants for development of selfhood through play and its personal possibilities. But sport is not essentially tied to audience as is theatre. Moreover, conceptualising sport as a form of theatre valorises the spectator’s narrative as normative (...)
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  • Limitations of the Sport-Law Comparison.J. S. Russell - 2011 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 38 (2):254-272.
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  • Game Strengths.Paul Davis - 2006 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 33 (1):50-66.
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  • Cybersport.Dennis Hemphill - 2005 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 32 (2):195-207.
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  • On the Value and Meaning of Football: Recent Philosophical Perspectives in Latin America.Daniel Campos - 2010 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 37 (1):69-87.
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  • The Paper World of Bernard Suits.Allan Bäck - 2008 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 35 (2):156-174.
  • On Ascetic Practices and Hermeneutical Cycles.Ron Welters - 2016 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 10 (4):430-443.
    Sports reflection is rather locked into a binary view of narrow and broad internalists. Narrow internalists, or formalists, argue that sports are solely constituted by their rules: the ‘autotelic’ stance. Broad internalists, or interpretivists, on the other hand, reason that sport is more than just a lusory end in itself. This paper will revitalize reflection on sports as a locus of the human condition by breaking through this binary opposition. It will focus on the positive aspects of the concept of (...)
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  • Playing with Your Self: A Philosophical Exploration of Attitudes and Identities in Games.Liam Miller - unknown
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  • Fields of Dreams and Men of Straw: Philosophical Reflections on Performance-Enhancers In Sport.Klaus V. Meier - 1991 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 18 (1):74-85.
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  • Performance Prestidigitation.Klaus V. Meier - 1989 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 16 (1):13-33.
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  • Sport and Motor Actions.Jan W. I. Tamboer - 1992 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 19 (1):31-45.
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  • The Trick of the Disappearing Goal.Bernard Suits - 1989 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 16 (1):1-12.
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  • The Possibilities and Consequences of Understanding Play as Dialogue.John Morgan & Ana Cristina Zimmermann - 2011 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 5 (1):46-62.
    (2011). The Possibilities and Consequences of Understanding Play as Dialogue. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy: Vol. 5, No. 1, pp. 46-62. doi: 10.1080/17511321.2010.511250.
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  • Ethical Issues in Boxing.Paul Davis - 1993 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 20 (1):48-63.
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  • Games and Fiction: Partners in the Evolution of Culture.Scott Kretchmar - 2017 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 11 (1):12-25.
    In this essay, I argue that the time is right in the philosophy of sport to follow the lead of systems thinking and emphasize the contextual embeddedness of sport, not its distinctive characteristics, least of all any claims for metaphysical independence. Accordingly, I analyze similarities between two cultural conventions—namely, literature and games—through the lens of evolution. I argue that common roots can be observed in games and fiction when looking at them structurally, semantically, and socially. I suggest that both games (...)
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  • E-Sports Are Not Sports.Jim Parry - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 13 (1):3-18.
    The conclusion of this paper will be that e-sports are not sports. I begin by offering a stipulation and a definition. I stipulate that what I have in mind, when thinking about the concept of sport, is ‘Olympic’ sport. And I define an Olympic Sport as an institutionalised, rule-governed contest of human physical skill. The justification for the stipulation lies partly in that it is uncontroversial. Whatever else people might think of as sport, no-one denies that Olympic Sport is sport. (...)
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  • A Functionalist Analysis of Game Acts: Revisiting Searle.R. Scott Kretchmar - 2001 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 28 (2):160-172.
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  • Reconsidering Autotelic Play.Stephen E. Schmid - 2009 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 36 (2):238-257.
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  • Beyond Autotelic Play.Stephen E. Schmid - 2011 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 38 (2):149-166.
    In the Philosophy of Sport literature, play has been widely conceived, in whole or part, as an autotelic activity; that is, an activity pursued for intrinsic factors. I examine several versions of the conception of play as an autotelic activity. Given these different accounts, I raise the question whether the concept of autotelic play is tenable. I examine three possibilities: (i) accept the concept of autotelic play and reject the possibility of satisfying the conditions for play activities; (ii) accept the (...)
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  • Sport as a Valued Human Practice: A Basis for the Consideration of Some Moral Issues in Sport.Peter J. Arnold - 1992 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 26 (2):237–255.
  • Pre-Lusory Goals for Games: A Gambit Declined.Angela J. Schneider & Robert B. Butcher - 1997 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 24 (1):38-46.
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  • Sport as a Valued Human Practice: A Basis for the Consideration of Some Moral Issues in Sport.Peter J. Arnold - 1992 - Philosophy of Education 26 (2):237-255.
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  • Sprints, Sports, and Suits.Mitchell N. Berman - 2013 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 40 (1):163-176.
    Philosophy of sport orthodoxy maintains the following three theses: (1) all sports (or all refereed sports) are games; (2) games are as Suits defined them; and (3) sprints are sports. This article argues that these three theses cannot be jointly maintained and offers exploratory thoughts regarding what might follow.
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  • Fruits, Apples, and Category Mistakes: On Sport, Games, and Play.Angela J. Schneider - 2001 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 28 (2):151-159.
    (2001). Fruits, Apples, and Category Mistakes: On Sport, Games, and Play. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport: Vol. 28, No. 2, pp. 151-159. doi: 10.1080/00948705.2001.9714610.
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  • Sport Philosophy Inquiry in 3D: A Pragmatic Response to the Philosophy Paradox.Tim L. Elcombe - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (3):317-333.
    A paradoxical attitude exists toward professional philosophy: philosophical inquiry is considered important and complex, but professionals are deemed irrelevant and unnecessary. This paradox doubly affects sport philosophy as evidenced by the field’s marginalization in higher education and sociopolitical discourse. To counter the sport philosophy paradox, I present a pragmatically oriented three-dimensional approach to inquiry that turns the field “inside-out”. A community of engaged, melioratively oriented sport philosophy inquirers in this 3D model collectively conducts theoretical, applied, and instrumental inquiry. Each dimension (...)
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  • Christian Instrumentality of Sport as a Possible Source of Goodness for Atheists.Ivo Jirásek - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 12 (1):30-49.
    The aim of this paper is to differentiate between religion and spirituality more strictly, or, specifically, between the religious and spiritual aspects of sport. The text is written in an autoethnographic genre from an ‘outsider’ position, by an author who is not Christian. Religion, including Christianity, represents a connectedness between the natural world and an ontologically different reality and its transcendence towards the sacrum. But spirituality is the centre of the human way of being and a manifestation of personality. So (...)
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  • Play, Performance, and the Docile Athlete.Leslie A. Howe - 2007 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 1 (1):47 – 57.
    I respond to a hypothetical critique of sport, drawing on primarily post-modernist sources, that would view the high performance athlete in particular as a product of the application of technical disciplines of power and that opposes sport and play as fundamentally antithetical. Through extensive discussion of possible definitions of play, and of performance, I argue that although much of the critique is valid it confuses a method of sport for the whole of it. Play is indeed a noncompellable spontaneity, but (...)
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