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  1. Tacitus, Stoic Exempla, and the Praecipuum Munus Annalium.William Turpin - 2008 - Classical Antiquity 27 (2):359-404.
    Tacitus' claim that history should inspire good deeds and deter bad ones should be taken seriously: his exempla are supposed to help his readers think through their own moral difficulties. This approach to history is found in historians with clear connections to Stoicism, and in Stoic philosophers like Seneca. It is no coincidence that Tacitus is particularly interested in the behavior of Stoics like Thrasea Paetus, Barea Soranus, and Seneca himself. They, and even non-Stoic characters like Epicharis and Petronius, exemplify (...)
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  • Commentary on Asmis.David Sider - 1991 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 7 (1):94-105.
  • Diogenes Laërtius: A Moderate Skeptic in the History of Philosophy.Ramón Román-Alcalá - 2021 - Philosophy Study 11 (4).
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  • Whose Platonism?Will Rasmussen - 2005 - International Journal of Hindu Studies 9 (1-3):131-152.
  • Stefan Schorn, Studien zur hellenistischen Biographie und Historiographie, Berlin (De Gruyter) 2018 (Beiträge zur Altertumskunde), 510 S., ISBN 978-3-11-044755-2 (geb.), € 119,95Studien zur hellenistischen Biographie und Historiographie. [REVIEW]Lisa Irene Hau - 2020 - Klio 102 (1):345-351.
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  • ‘Ta Polla Hêssô Nou: A Puzzle in Xenophanes’.James Lesher - 2022 - Ancient Philosophy 42:1-6.
    Diogenes Laertius reports (in his Lives of Eminent Philosophers ix 19) that Xenophanes of Colophon stated that ta polla hêssô nou (in some sense, ‘that the many give way to mind’). After reviewing four alternative but unsatisfactory ways of understanding the remark I argue that it is best understood as ‘the multitude of things (i.e. the cosmos) gives way to—is mastered by—the (divine) mind.’ When understood in this way the remark establishes Xenophanes as one of the earliest Greek thinkers to (...)
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  • Disciplining Skepticism Through Kant's Critique, Fichte's Idealism, and Hegel's Negations.Meghant Sudan - 2021 - In Vicente Raga Rosaleny (ed.), Doubt and Disbelief in Modern European Thought. Springer. pp. 247-272.
    This chapter considers the encounter of skepticism with the Kantian and post-Kantian philosophical enterprise and focuses on the intriguing feature whereby it is assimilated into this enterprise. In this period, skepticism becomes interchangeable with its other, which helps understand the proliferation of many kinds of views under its name and which forms the background for transforming skepticism into an anonymous, routine practice of raising objections and counter-objections to one’s own view. German philosophers of this era counterpose skepticism to dogmatism and (...)
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  • Challenges in Reading the Greek Philosophers.Behnaz Aghili Dehkordi & Hossein Kalbasi Ashtari - 2017 - Metaphysik 9 (23):19-36.
    Although Presocratics in 600 B.C founded new research ways in science and philosophy, wrote the first scientific essays, introduced basic conceptions of deduction, and abandoned mythological explanations, all we have of their works is but the fragments in the works of further doxographers, biographers, historians or philosophers who brought their statements between their own words. This would sometimes result in misunderstanding the presocratics’ purposes. Hermann Diels in his Doxographi Graeci raised a new method for dealing with doxography tradition. Diels’ new (...)
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