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  1. ‘It’s Not Worse Than Eating Them’: The Limits of Analogy in Bioethics.Julian J. Koplin - 2020 - Monash Bioethics Review 38 (2):129-145.
    Bioethicists often defend novel practices by drawing analogies with practices that we are already familiar with and currently tolerate. If some novel practice is less bad than some widely-accepted practice, then we cannot rightly reject it. Using the bioethics literature on xenotransplantation and interspecies blastocyst complementation as a case study, I show how this style of argument can go awry. The key problem is that our moral intuitions about familiar practices can be distorted by their seeming normality. When considering the (...)
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  • Xenotransplantation: A Bioethical Evaluation.M. Anderson - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (4):205-208.
    Allograft shortage is a formidable obstacle in organ transplantation. Xenotransplantation, the interspecies transplantation of cells, tissues, and organs, or ex vivo interspecies exchange between cells, tissues, and organs is a frequently suggested alternative to this allograft shortage. As xenotransplantation steadily improves into a viable allotransplantation alternative, several bioethical considerations coalesce. Such considerations include the Helsinki declaration’s guarantee of patients’ rights to privacy; political red tape that may select for undermined socioeconomic groups as the first recipients of xenografts; industry incentives in (...)
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  • The Challenge of "Sperm Ships": The Need for the Global Regulation of Medical Technology.D. Hunter & S. Oultram - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (7):552-556.
    This paper discusses the notion of using international shipping legislation to provide healthcare technologies to inhabitants of a country on a ship in international waters based just outside the country’s border. This allows technologies that would otherwise be unavailable, regulated or banned to the citizens of a particular nation to be available, just offshore. This is because in international waters ships are governed by the laws of their home nation not those they are nearby. We focus on the example suggested (...)
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  • Ethical Issues of Transplant Coordinators in Japan and the Uk.Fumie Arie - 2008 - Nursing Ethics 15 (5):656-669.
    Ethical problems surrounding organ donation have been discussed since before technologies supported the procedure. In addition to issues on a societal level (e.g. brain-stem death, resource allocation), ethical concerns permeate the clinical practice of health care staff. These latter have been little studied. Using qualitative methods, this study, focused on transplant co-ordinators and their descriptions of dilemmas, ethical concerns and actions in response to them. Interviews with three co-ordinators in Japan and two in the UK revealed five areas in which (...)
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