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  1. Trust Increases Euthanasia Acceptance: A Multilevel Analysis Using the European Values Study.Vanessa Köneke - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):86.
    This study tests how various kinds of trust impact attitudes toward euthanasia among the general public. The indication that trust might have an impact on euthanasia attitudes is based on the slippery slope argument, which asserts that allowing euthanasia might lead to abuses and involuntary deaths. Adopting this argument usually leads to less positive attitudes towards euthanasia. Tying in with this, it is assumed here that greater trust diminishes such slippery slope fears, and thereby increases euthanasia acceptance.
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  • Should Assisted Dying Be Legalised?Thomas D. G. Frost, Devan Sinha & Barnabas J. Gilbert - 2014 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 9:3.
    When an individual facing intractable pain is given an estimate of a few months to live, does hastening death become a viable and legitimate alternative for willing patients? Has the time come for physicians to do away with the traditional notion of healthcare as maintaining or improving physical and mental health, and instead accept their own limitations by facilitating death when requested? The Universities of Oxford and Cambridge held the 2013 Varsity Medical Debate on the motion “This House Would Legalise (...)
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  • Ethically Preferable Alternative Practice: “No”; A Preferable, Head-to-Head Analytical Approach: “Maybe”.Jeffrey Kirby - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (6):57 - 59.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 6, Page 57-59, June 2011.
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  • Is Continuous Sedation at the End of Life an Ethically Preferable Alternative to Physician-Assisted Suicide?Kasper Raus, Sigrid Sterckx & Freddy Mortier - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (6):32 - 40.
    The relatively new practice of continuous sedation at the end of life (CS) is increasingly being debated in the clinical and ethical literature. This practice received much attention when a U.S. Supreme Court ruling noted that the availability of CS made legalization of physician-assisted suicide (PAS) unnecessary, as CS could alleviate even the most severe suffering. This view has been widely adopted. In this article, we perform an in-depth analysis of four versions of this ?argument of preferable alternative.? Our goal (...)
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  • Assisted Suicide is Compatible with Medical Ethos.Angela K. Martin, Alex Mauron & Samia A. Hurst - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (6):55 - 57.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 6, Page 55-57, June 2011.
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  • Pathologizing Suffering and the Pursuit of a Peaceful Death.Ben A. Rich - 2014 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (4):403-416.
    The specialty of psychiatry has a long-standing, virtually monolithic view that a desire to die, even a desire for a hastened death among the terminally ill, is a manifestation of mental illness. Recently, psychiatry has made significant inroads into hospice and palliative care, and in doing so brings with it the conviction that dying patients who seek to end their suffering by asserting control over the time and manner of their inevitable death should be provided with psychotherapeutic measures rather than (...)
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  • The Traditional Account of Ethics and Law at the End of Life—and its Discontents.Roger S. Magnusson - 2009 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (3):307-324.
    For the past 30 years, the Melbourne urologist Dr Rodney Syme has quietly—and more recently, not-so-quietly—assisted terminally and permanently ill people to die. This paper draws on Syme’s recent book, A Good Death: An Argument for Voluntary Euthanasia , to identify and to reflect on some important challenges to what I outline as the traditional account of law, ethics, and end of life decisions. Among the challenges Syme makes to the traditional view is his argument that physicians’ intentions are frail (...)
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